Dance

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG
Natalie Ai Kamauu and Family

 

Natalie Ai Kamauu’s voice fills the PBS Hawaiʻi studio.  Natalie performs with a passion that comes from the origins of the songs she sings, and the love she has for her family. She is joined by her husband, Iolani Kamauu, on guitar and vocals, and their daughter, Sha-Lei Kamauu, who accompanies the music with hula.

 

Na Mele: Natalie Ai Kamauu and Family

 

Among the songs featured are “Pili Aloha,” which connects Natalie to her mother, kumu hula Olana Ai, and “Shower Tree,” which was written for Natalie and Iolani’s son, Chaz. Sha-Lei joins Natalie and Iolani with hula, including the playful “Hula Tease,” and a graceful accompaniment to Natalie and Iolaniʻs performance on “Uhiwai.”

 

 

 

AFROPOP: THE ULTIMATE CULTURAL EXCHANGE
My Friend Fela and Birth of Afrobeat

 

A new perspective on the Nigerian musician Fela Kuti, “My Friend Fela” is told through conversations with his close friend and official biographer, African-Cuban Carlos Moore. The accompanying live-action animated short, “Birth of Afrobeat,” tells how Nigerian drummer Tony Allen and his partner Fela Kuti created the Afrobeat genre.

 

 

 

The Chaperone on Masterpiece

 

Louise Brooks, the 1920s silver screen sensation who never met a rule she didn’t break, epitomized the restless, reckless spirit of the Jazz Age. But, just a few years earlier, she was a 15 year-old student in Wichita, Kansas for whom fame and fortune were only dreams. When the opportunity arises for her to go to New York to study with a leading dance troupe, her mother (Victoria Hill) insists there be a chaperone. Norma Carlisle (Elizabeth McGovern, Downton Abbey), a local society matron who never broke a rule in her life, impulsively volunteers to accompany Louise (Haley Lu Richardson) to New York for the summer.

 

 

 

Otherwise It’s Just Firewood

 

In a feat of musical extreme sports, violinist Daniel Hoffman has just one week to learn to play Irish fiddle with master fiddler James Kelly, in County Clare, Ireland. and then somehow, perform with him in concert. His attempt to achieve the impossible, as well as his encounters with a range of Irish philosophers, musicians, and dancers, reveals unexpected secrets about Ireland and about himself.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 3|5|20: 2020 Winter Challenge High School Division | Program

 

This special edition features stories from the High School Division of the 2020 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge. On January 31, 2020, participating elementary, middle school and high school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the prompt: “The wisdom of elders brought to life by the young.” Teachers could not provide hands-on help. The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own. The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

1.) How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?

2.) How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?

3.) How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, First-Place, Second-Place, Third-Place, and Honorable Mention awards were given in both the middle school and high school divisions. The following High School Division awardees will be featured in this special:

 

–First Place in the High School Division:

 

“The Show Goes On”
The challenge team from Maui High School tells the story of a dance instructor whose love for the art form inspires generations of passionate dancers to continue the cycle of knowledge and inspiration.

 

HIKI NŌ 3|5|20: 2020 Winter Challenge High School Division | Program

 

–Second Place in the High School Division:

 

“Major Advice”
The challenge team from Waimea High School on Kauaʻi tells the story of a retired Army major who empowers generations of JROTC cadets to achieve their goals and become leaders by looking out for their welfare and teaching them hallmarks of success.

 

–Third Place in the High School Division:

 

“More Than Just a Language”
The challenge team from Hilo High School on the Big Island tells the story of a high school student who learned more than language and cultural traditions from her Hawaiian language class. Along with the special bond she formed with her teacher and class, she gained morals and values that she wishes to pass on to her younger brother and those after him.

 

–Honorable Mention in the High School Division:

 

”Intergenerational Practices”
The challenge team from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tells the story of a Japanese folk dance teacher and a student whose passion for perpetuating the Japanese tradition makes his family and community members proud.

 

HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge stories from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu and Kauaʻi High School are also featured.

 

“No Cost for Kindness”
The challenge team from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu tells the story of a student who learned respect and kindness at home and practices these lessons at school by helping kids in need.

 

“Mālama Huleʻia: Preserving the Past”
The challenge team from Kauaʻi High School tells the story of a non-profit organization that relies on the wisdom and traditions of elders to connect with the past, revitalize Hawaiian lands, and teach the community youth to take care of the environment for years to come.

 

First-place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Second-place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Third-place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Honorable mention winners will receive $100 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

From The Streets to the Stage: The Journey of Fredrick Davis

From The Streets to the Stage: The Journey of Fredrick Davis

 

Follow ballet dancer Frederick Davis’ personal journey, which began with a broken family and homelessness. His exposure to dance at age 11 changed his life – he found inspiration and support from Ballet Tennessee, his church family and a caring community.

 

 

 

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