demand

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
What’s it Going to Take? – Low Wages and the Lack of Affordability in Hawaiʻi

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI is taking a deeper dive into longstanding problems highlighted during our two-hour live program, What’s it Going to Take? An executive forum on making life better in Hawaiʻi.

 

· 51% of renting households in Hawai’i spend more than 30% of their income on rent. · 38% of jobs pay a living wage, which equates to more than $20/hour. · 48% of households do not meet the Survival Budget level and struggle to afford living in Hawaiʻi (Source: Hawaiʻi Community Foundation)

 

Click the link to learn more about the Change Framework: ChangeforHawaii.org

 

The first of three special editions of INSIGHTS will focus on Low Wages and the Lack of Affordability in Hawaiʻi. Those scheduled to appear on the program include: the band director of Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School in Līhuʻe, Kauaʻi; the owner of a small business in Mānoa, Oʻahu; a warehouse worker from Pālolo, Oʻahu; and a University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa economist. You can join the conversation by phoning in, or by leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also streamed live on pbshawaii.org and PBS Hawaiʻi’s Facebook page.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

Board Chair Jason Fujimoto Steps Down, But Not Away

 

CEO Message

 

Board Chair Jason Fujimoto Steps Down, But Not Away

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEOBecause of time constraints in assuming a new business role, PBS Hawai‘i’s Board Chair Jason Fujimoto of Hawai‘i Island has elected to step down from our nonprofit’s chairmanship, while continuing to serve on our Board.

 

At age 38, Jason is the new President and CEO of Hilo-based HPM Building Supply, supporting residential building statewide. He’s the fifth-generation President of the family-founded, employee-owned business.

 

Jason will be succeeded as Board Chair July 1 by current Vice Chair Joanne Lo Grimes, an attorney and Co-Chair of the law firm Carlsmith Ball.

 

Before Jason turns over the reins, I want to honor him for his integrity, skills and steadfastness in supporting and governing this nonprofit through rapid evolution.

 

Board Chair Jason Fujimoto with Leslie WilcoxHe’s had two tours of duty, amounting to a decade of unpaid service, most of them on the Board Executive Committee, including three years as Chair. He joined the first time in 2008, just before the state felt the impact of the Great Recession. In succession came the big switch from analog to digital broadcast transmission; the television equivalent of a heart transplant – high-definition TV; expanded local programming; the birth of HIKI NŌ: The Nation’s First Statewide Student News Network; the rise of social media as a new platform for engagement and video programming; and the successful capital campaign to buy land and build a replacement multimedia home in Kalihi Kai.

 

Jason returned to the Board just after we moved into our new facility. He led the organization in adopting a new three-year strategic plan. In cloudy times for media enterprises and nonprofits, the plan is clear.

 

There’s a feeling we’re all on the same path and same page, in part because different perspectives and ideas can be argued and adopted safely and productively.

 

“As Chair, my style is to create the conditions that foster the greatest amount of collaboration and discussion, and support the CEO,” Jason said.

 

A former Wall Street analyst, Jason is a member of the Omidyar Forum of Fellows and the leadership group Hawai‘i Asia Pacific Association (HAPA).

 

“I really enjoy being with everyone on the PBS Hawai‘i Board. We have a lot to learn from each other,” he said.

 

For me personally, I’ve internalized much of the guidance Jason gave me, and I’m grateful for this lifelong gift.

 

Overall, Jason, thank you from the heart for continuing to strengthen and polish this community treasure that is PBS Hawai‘i.

 

Aloha Nui,

Leslie signature


 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
High Cost of Child Care in Hawaiʻi

 

Caring for our keiki is pricey. A recent study says Hawai‘i families pay an average of $700 to nearly $2,000 per month for child care. And that’s if parents can find space at licensed childcare centers – where supply is far short of demand.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 


INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
How Big a Role Will Solar Play in Hawai‘i’s Goals for a Clean Energy Future?

 

The demand in Hawaii for residential rooftop solar permits has declined between 50-70% when you compare any given week in 2012 vs. 2016. The reasons have been widely reported and debated. Where does that leave solar as part of the diverse portfolio of renewable energy resources needed to achieve the State’s ambitious goal? By 2045, electricity must be generated using 100% clean energy.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights