Depression

NIGHTLY BUSINESS REPORT

NIGHTLY BUSINESS REPORT

Anchors Tyler Mathisen and Sue Herera

 

Every weeknight, the Emmy winning NIGHTLY BUSINESS REPORT delivers the day’s essential business and economic news. Each lively half-hour combines trusted, credible and unbiased information and extensive financial market coverage with insightful features, analysis and commentaries by noted economists and business experts.

 

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HIKI NŌ
The Top Stories of the Fall Semester, 2018-2019

HIKI NŌ Episode 1008 – The Top Stories of the Fall Semester, 2018-2019

 

This compilation show features some of the top stories from the fall semester of the 2018-2019 school year. Each of the stories presents a variation on a theme that has become a hallmark of HIKI NŌ storytelling: empathy.

 

Program

 

–Students at Waiākea High School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island tell the story of a married couple for whom empathy has become a profession and a way of life: husband and wife both work in the foster care industry and foster children themselves.

 

–Students at H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tell the story of a fitness coach who channels his own physical and psychological challenges into developing empathy for his clients.

 

–Students at Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a young woman who is grappling depression and has, on occasion, harmed herself. The student storytellers who created this feature deal with this sensitive topic with a great deal of empathy.

 

–Students at Konawaena High School and Konawaena Middle School on Hawai‘i Island collaborated on a story which shows that empathy is not limited to people’s feelings for other people. Human interactions with goats at the Dancing Goat Sanctuary prove that animals often elicit and deserve our empathy.

 

–Students at Kamehameha Schools Maui High School show how one teenager’s empathy for girls who suffer from low self-esteem inspired her to launch a positive self-image workshop for young women.

 

–Students at ‘Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu tell an empathy-driven story about the highly personal connection between a young dancer and her art form.

 

–Students at Waimea High School on Kaua‘i tell the story of a girl’s battle with Hodgkin’s lymphoma in a way that leads viewers from feeling sympathy for to sharing empathy with the young patient.

 

This special episode is hosted by Yasha Ronquillo, a 2018 HIKI NŌ graduate from Maui High School who is currently a part-time HIKI NŌ teacher at her alma mater.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Sustainable Boost and other stories

HIKI NŌ: Episode #1002

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i introduce us to an unconventional food source in the U.S. – crickets! Kaua‘i farmer Lourdes Torres recalls first hearing about the idea of insects as food from her grandmother. “She would point at them and say, ‘That’s food.’” And we thought, “Yeah, maybe, if there was famine.” But as co-founder of food manufacturing company Sustainable Boost, Torres has developed a cricket/taro blend powder that is high in protein and is said to have a mild, nutty flavor. She raises the crickets on a plant-based diet, and the insects have a much smaller impact on the environment than other forms of livestock.

 
Program

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a young woman who bravely faces her battle with depression every day.

 

Students from Waimea Elementary School on Hawai‘i make their HIKI NŌ debut by showing us how to make pickled mango. (Waimea Elementary is only the fourth elementary school to have a project air on HIKI NŌ.)

 

Students from Wai‘anae High School on O‘ahu introduce us to ‘ukulele player Nick Acosta, who has become a virtuoso on the instrument, despite the fact that he has only one complete arm.

 

Students from Kaua‘i High School in Līhu‘e take us to a local establishment that serves coffee and also serves the community.

 

Students from ‘Ilima Intermediate School on O‘ahu show us how a community pool has become a special gathering place for those who swim there.

 

And students from Island School on Kaua‘i show us how an invasive plant is being eradicated from Kaua‘i’s waterways.

 

 

 

The Wild Ponies of Chincoteague

The Wild Ponies of Chincoteague

 

THE WILD PONIES OF CHINCOTEAGUE follows the annual Chincoteague wild pony swim and auction, as well as one teenager’s journey to buy her first foal. The one-hour documentary begins with a legend. In the 17th century, a Spanish galleon crashed off the Virginia coast. In the hold was a band of ponies. The sinking ship fractured on the shoals, spilling the ponies into the Atlantic Ocean. The ponies swam for their lives and reached the barrier island of Assateague. Their descendants roam free on the island today. Ownership of the herd now belongs to the volunteer fire company on nearby Chincoteague Island. To keep the population in check, the firemen hold an annual auction and sell the foals. Buyers come from across the country and Canada for a chance to bid on a Chincoteague pony. Sabrina Dobbins, a teenager who has struggled with depression, is attending the auction this year to find a pony to help with her recovery. Her dream of owning one of the wild Chincoteague ponies is being realized by a local nonprofit that helps deserving children purchase an auction foal. With her hand held high, the auctioneer barks “Sold!” and, just like that, Sabrina happily becomes the proud owner of Blessing the pony.

 

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
Farmer/Veteran

 

A combat veteran starts a farm to help cultivate a healthier life outside the Army. While the sense of duty he once felt as a soldier returns, his crippling PTSD remains as he and his wife nervously anticipate the birth of their first child.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #803

 

TOP STORY:
Students from H.P. Baldwin High School in Wailuku, Maui tell the story of Karina Bhattacharya, a young artist diagnosed with bi-polar disorder. Bi-polar disorder, also known as manic depression, is a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity levels and the ability to carry out day-to-day tasks. Although her condition has presented Karina with many challenges, she tries to keep a positive outlook. Studies have shown that one silver-lining of bi-polar disorder is its possible link to increased creativity. Karina feels that it has had a positive effect on her painting. “I could see everything the way it was,” says Karina, “and I even started noticing small details. I noticed that my paintings became more vivid. I use new colors…” The ability to express herself through her art has also helped Karina deal with her disorder.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
Students at Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a young man who restored his religious beliefs by organizing musical events for a faith-based community organization.

 

Students from Pacific Buddhist Academy on O‘ahu demonstrate the steps involved in a traditional Buddhist incense ritual.

 

The journalists from Mililani Middle School in Central O‘ahu highlight the efforts of fellow students who are restoring ancient Hawaiian fishing areas around Mokauea Island in the airport industrial area.

 

Students from Kaua‘i High School in Lihu‘e show us the ins and outs of a bio-mass plant on the Garden Isle.

 

And the students at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i show us how a family that drag races together, stays together.

 

This program encores Saturday, Dec. 3 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Dec. 4 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



JAZZ
The True Welcome (1929-1935)

JAZZ: The True Welcome (1929-1935)

 

Acclaimed filmmaker Ken Burns tells the story of jazz – the quintessential American art form. The 10-part series follows the growth and development of jazz music from its beginnings to the present.

 

The True Welcome (1929-1935)
Amid the Depression, the Lindy Hop begins to catch on at dance halls. The reminiscences of two of Harlem’s great dancers, Frankie Manning and Norma Miller, inform the episode. As swing dancing catches on, a new kind of big band jazz begins to emerge.