development

Humanity from Space

 

Trace humankind’s long journey from hunter-gatherer to dominant global species. From the perspective of space, this special uses mind-boggling data and CGI to disclose the breathtaking extent of humanity’s influence, revealing how we’ve transformed our planet and produced an interconnected world of extraordinary complexity. A trip through 12,000 years of development, the documentary shows how seemingly small flashes of innovation have changed the course of civilization. As our global population soars, the program considers the challenges humanity will face in order to survive.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Kaka‘ako Development

 

As Islanders see plans turn into reality for the modernization of Kaka‘ako, what thoughts come to mind? Is Kaka‘ako’s building boom of glass towers and other high -rises the right thing? Who will live there and will there be a sense of community in the re-invented district?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights


AMERICAN MASTERS
Charles & Ray Eames: The Architect and the Painter

 

From 1941 to 1978, the husband-and-wife team of Ray and Charles Eames brought unique talents to their partnership. He was an architect by training; she was a painter and sculptor. Together, they are considered America’s most important and influential designers, whose work literally helped shape the second half of the 20th century and remains culturally vital and commercially popular today. Ray and Charles Eames are, perhaps, best remembered for their mid-century modern furniture, built from novel materials like molded plywood, fiberglass-reinforced plastic, bent metal wire and aluminum – offering consumers beautiful, functional, yet inexpensive products. Revered for their designs and fascinating as individuals, they have risen to iconic status in American culture, but their influence on significant events and movements in American life – from the development of modernism to the rise of the computer age – has been less widely understood.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
What Did Our Lawmakers Do This Session to Make Hawai‘i Better?

 

The last week of the 2015 legislative session included a flurry of final votes on many of the session’s biggest bills, including a $26 billion budget, a commitment to 100 percent renewable energy by 2045, a five-year extension on the rail tax for Honolulu residents, the creation of a statewide medical marijuana dispensary system, and a modified plan to protect more than 600 acres of undeveloped land on Oahu’s North Shore. Did the Legislature decide to spend taxpayer money wisely? If signed by the governor, how will the new laws impact Hawai‘i residents?

 

STANDING ON SACRED GROUND
Profit & Loss

 

In this four-part documentary series, native people share ecological wisdom and spiritual reverence while battling a utilitarian view of land in the form of consumer culture and resource extraction as well as competing religions and climate change.

 

Profit & Loss
In Papua New Guinea, a Chinese government-owned nickel mine has relocated villagers to a taboo sacred mountain, built a new pipeline and refinery on contested clan land, and dumped mining waste into the sea. In Alberta, First Nations people suffer from rare cancers as their traditional hunting grounds are strip-mined to unearth the world’s third-largest oil reserve. Indigenous people tell their own stories – and confront us with the ethical consequences of our culture of consumption.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
What Is the Best Future for Kaho‘olawe?


 

Kaho‘olawe, an island that many Hawaiians hold as sacred, has been a cultural and political touchstone since the 1970s. When the U.S. military handed over control of Kaho‘olawe to the state of Hawai‘i, unexploded bombs and erosion left a barren landscape that many to this day are working to replant and restore. Today, Kaho‘olawe waits to be transferred to a Native Hawaiian entity to manage the island, but funding for the clean-up is fast running out. The Legislature has approved $2 million to help continue the restoration of Kaho‘olawe, but will it be enough?

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I is a live public affairs show that is also live streamed on PBSHawaii.org.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

NOVA

This is the NOVA programs page. You will find recently aired and past NOVA programs here.

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
The Forgotten Plague


By the dawn of the 19th century, the deadliest killer in human history, tuberculosis, had killed one in seven of all the people who had ever lived. The disease struck America with a vengeance, ravaging communities and touching the lives of almost every family. The battle against the deadly bacteria had a profound and lasting impact on the country. It shaped medical and scientific pursuits, social habits, economic development, western expansion, and government policy. Yet both the disease and its impact are poorly understood: in the words of one writer, tuberculosis is our “forgotten plague.”

 

Rickover:
The Birth of Nuclear Power

 

Combative, provocative and searingly blunt, Admiral Hyman G. Rickover was a flamboyant maverick and a unique American. When few thought it possible, then-Captain Rickover undertook to harness the power of the atom to drive the first nuclear-powered submarine, the USS Nautilus, whose trip under the polar ice pack was one of the great adventure stories of the 1950s. Later, Rickover built the world’s first commercial nuclear power plant at Shippingport, PA. Rickover’s achievements made him a national celebrity, and he appeared on the cover of Time magazine. Many questioned Rickover’s goal of an all nuclear navy, and others questioned his creation of a technocratic elite, his own navy within the Navy. However, few contested that he had transformed the Navy and changed the course of America’s technological development.

 

 

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