device

BREAKTHROUGH: THE IDEAS THAT CHANGED THE WORLD
The Smartphone

BREAKTHROUGH: THE IDEAS THAT CHANGED THE WORLD - The Smartphone

 

Dial in to the fascinating history of the smartphone, from its roots in Morse Code to 2007, when Apple unveiled the first-ever iPhone. Plus, see how the next generation of smartphones will allow us to communicate through them just by thinking.

 

Preview

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
#1010 – A Spark from Within and other stories

HIKI NŌ Episode 1010:  Robotics captain John Fabella and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

“A Spark from Within”
Students from Maui High School in Kahului introduce us to Maui High robotics captain John Fabella. John’s mother passed away when he was just seven years of age, and his father was deported. Growing up without his biological parents, John found an extended family in his Maui Waena Intermediate School robotics team and later, in the Maui High School team. Says John, “I made family through robotics. I made that family. It’s not the family that was given to me. My friends now, my brothers, you know, my sisters now. They help me every single day and they push me further.”

 

Program

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School tell the story of a female wrestler who used to be teased and bullied about her weight, and lost the pounds to regain her self-esteem.

 

–Students from Hawai‘i Preparatory Academy Middle School in the Waimea district of Hawai‘i Island show us the proper way to saddle a horse.

 

–Students from Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu report on “text neck,” a deformation of the spine caused by excessive texting and other uses of personal electronic devices.

 

–Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului show us how a Maui family continues their New Year’s tradition of mochi pounding, even after the passing of the family matriarch.

 

–Students from Saint Francis School in the Mānoa district of O‘ahu profile a young entrepreneur who was inspired by his “tiger mom” to open an innovative ice cream business.

 

–Students from Nānākuli High and Intermediate School feature a young performing arts student whose biggest fan is his mother – even though she is deaf and not able to hear his musical performances.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students from Island School in Līhu‘e, Kaua‘i.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
How Cyber-Secure Are You?

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I revisits one of the program’s most popular discussion topics from last year – online security. From the internet, to mobile devices, to virtual worlds, it’s becoming more challenging to discern between genuine threats and ones exacerbated by the media. Meanwhile, cyber-criminals are becoming increasingly aggressive in their strategies. The experts who appeared in last year’s discussion, including guests from the FBI’s Honolulu Division and the University of Hawai‘i, return with the latest information and advice on preventing and avoiding online security breaches.

 

Join us during our live discussion by phoning in, or leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also live streamed on pbshawaii.org and Facebook Live.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
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Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

Strategy from a Swordfighter

Musashi Miyamoto, right, as depicted by artist Yoshitaki Tsunejiro

 

Musashi Minamoto, right, as depicted by artist Yoshitake Tsunejiro.

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiOne of the greatest swordfighters in history comes to mind as PBS Hawai‘i sets out to draft a new strategic plan to guide us in a rapidly changing media environment.

 

“Do nothing which is of no use,” wrote samurai Musashi Miyamoto, when he wasn’t roaming Japan wielding two swords, facing enemies in the Edo period.

 

Yes, Miyamoto-San, we must decide what skills and habits of mind we need to take with us into the future, in order to serve up great content on the many viewing screens in people’s lives. Folks might want to lean back for an hour-long documentary on a big wall monitor; catch a one-minute clip on their smartphone; or participate in a globally interactive discussion on their tablet. In fact, it’s already become common for people to use two digital devices at the same time to access content.

 

“Perception is strong and sight weak. In strategy, it is important to see distant things as if they were close and to take a distanced view of close things.” So true, Minamoto-San, as we clear the bias of the present moment and attempt to see with clarity how we and fellow Islanders will want to use media and storytelling in the years ahead. Our organization used to peer ahead five years; now, even trying to pin down the next three years in this industry seems foolhardy.

 

In meetings held so far, our Board of Directors, Staff and stakeholders agree that PBS Hawai‘i must create a far-reaching system of touch points for people to encounter our programming. We’ll go where people are, rather than wait for them on a television monitor. We’ll continue to broadcast. However, many more people will want to engage in content online, selecting what they want to see when they want to see it. We want that, too.

 

First and foremost, we’re storytellers. We can and will adapt, to meet the need for quality stories and interactivity in different ways on different digital devices.

 

“Fixation is the way to death. Fluidity is the way to life,” wrote Miyamoto, who was known for anticipating an opponent’s moves and unleashing unexpected moves to bring victory.

 

However, the future isn’t all about fluidity and change. Like many of our viewers, we intend to hold onto our mindsets of curiosity, discovery, resilience, fairness; our belief in exposure to diverse viewpoints and civil discourse; and the value of universal access to education and reliable information.

 

When our Board of Directors adopts a new strategic plan at mid-year, we’ll share the plan with you and count on your feedback as we evolve. As Miyamoto-San said, “It may seem difficult at first, but everything is difficult at first.”

 

At least we don’t run the risk of sword injuries! We do stand a fighting chance of creating richer and more versatile viewing experiences for you.

 

Aloha a hui hou,
Leslie signature

 

PBS Hawai‘i Passport

PBS Hawaii Passport, your new member benefit
PBS Hawaii Passport, you new member benefit.

 

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The Human Face of Big Data

 

During the first day of a baby’s life the amount of data generated by humanity is equivalent to 70 times the information contained in the Library of Congress. What will it mean to live in a world where every moment, from birth to death, is digitally chronicled and preserved in vast cloud-based databases, forever? This film captures the promise and potential peril of the extraordinary knowledge revolution.