dialogue

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Speaking Truth to Power

 

The phrase “speak truth to power” is often used to describe an act of courage and non-violence, standing up for what one believes to be the truth, despite resistance from powerful forces. We often think of figures like Martin Luther King Jr., Anita Hill, or the man who stood in the path of tanks in Tiananmen Square.

 

Perhaps the people who have changed our own community by speaking truth to power are our greatest inspiration. On INSIGHTS, we’ll ask three of them about the meaning of truth and how it inspired them personally to face powerful opposition: Attorney General Doug Chin, who filed a lawsuit on behalf of the State of Hawai‘i that successfully challenged the second national travel ban; Randy Roth, a community activist and co-author of Broken Trust; and Loretta Sheehan, trial attorney and member of the Honolulu Police Commission. Colin Moore, UH political science professor and Director of the Public Policy Center, is also scheduled to join this discussion.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 


‘Indie Lens Pop-Up’ film screenings will relocate to PBS Hawai‘i headquarters

PBS Hawaii

For questions regarding this press release, contact:
Liberty Peralta
lperalta@pbshawaii.org
808.462.5030

 

Download this Press Release

 

‘Indie Lens Pop-Up’ film screenings will relocate to PBS Hawai‘i headquartersHONOLULU, HI – Indie Lens Pop-Up – the free neighborhood screenings of films from the award-winning PBS series, Independent Lens – will take place at PBS Hawai‘i’s headquarters at 315 Sand Island Access Road in Honolulu.

 

Indie Lens Pop-Up brings people together for community-driven conversations around Independent Lens documentaries.

 

“At a time when national conversations about important social issues seem to be overwhelmingly divided, our work with this program has provided a unique space for community members of diverse backgrounds and beliefs to come together and engage in dialogue with one another,” said Duong-Chi Do, Director of Engagement & Impact at Independent Television Service (ITVS), the presenting organization behind Independent Lens.

 

PBS Hawai‘i and fellow creative nonprofit Hawai‘i Women in Filmmaking continue to be local co-presenters of Indie Lens Pop-Up. Previously, Indie Lens Pop-Up screenings were held at Hawaii Filmmakers Collective in Kaimuki, and the ARTS at Marks Garage in Downtown Honolulu.

 

The Bad Kids by Lou Pepe and Keith Fulton
Tuesday, February 7, 6:30 pm
PBS Hawai‘i, 315 Sand Island Access Road, Honolulu
Click to RSVP on Eventbrite

 

Located in an impoverished Mojave Desert community, Black Rock Continuation High School is an alternative for at-risk students with little hope of graduating from a traditional high school. It’s their last chance. This coming of age story shows extraordinary educators and talented students combat the crippling effects of poverty.

 

Newtown by Kim A. Snyder
Tuesday, March 14, 6:30 pm
PBS Hawai‘i, 315 Sand Island Access Road, Honolulu
Click to RSVP on Eventbrite
 

Newtown uses deeply personal testimonies to tell the story of the aftermath of the Sandy Hook Elementary shooting, the deadliest mass shooting of schoolchildren in American history. Through poignant interviews with parents, siblings, teachers, doctors, and first responders, Newtown documents a traumatized community still reeling from the senseless killing, fractured by grief but driven toward a sense of purpose.

 

National Bird by Sonia Kennebeck
Tuesday, April 4, 6:30 pm
PBS Hawai‘i, 315 Sand Island Access Road, Honolulu

 

National Bird follows whistleblowers who, despite possible consequences, are determined to break the silence around one of the most controversial issues of our time: the secret U.S. drone war. The film gives rare insight through the eyes of both survivors and veterans who suffer from PTSD while plagued by guilt over participating in the killing of faceless people in foreign countries.

 

Real Boy by Shaleece Haas
Tuesday, June 6, 6:30 pm
PBS Hawai‘i, 315 Sand Island Access Road, Honolulu

 

Real Boy is the coming-of-age story of Bennett, a trans teenager with dreams of musical stardom. During the first two years of his gender transition, as Bennett works to repair a strained relationship with his family, he is taken under the wing of his friend and musical hero, celebrated trans folk singer Joe Stevens.

 

PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. pbshawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

Hawai‘i Women in Filmmaking is a nonprofit organization committed to achieving gender equity in filmmaking and other creative media arts. We are a creative and safe space where film and media-makers connect, create, mentor and inspire current and future generations of women to explore and pursue careers in the field of filmmaking.

 

hawaiiwomeninfilmmaking.org | facebook.com/HIWomenInFilmmaking | @WIF4HI on Twitter

 

Indie Lens Pop-Up is a neighborhood series that brings people together for film screenings and community-driven conversations. Featuring documentaries seen on the PBS series Independent Lens, Indie Lens Pop-Up draws local residents, leaders, and organizations to discuss what matters most, from newsworthy topics to family and relationships. Make friends, share stories, and join the conversation.

 

Independent Lens is an Emmy® Award-winning weekly series airing on PBS Monday nights at 10:00 pm. The acclaimed series features documentaries united by the creative freedom, artistic achievement, and unflinching visions of independent filmmakers. Presented by Independent Television Service, the series is funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people, with additional funding from PBS, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Wyncote Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

pbs.org/independentlens | facebook.com/independentlens | @IndependentLens on Twitter

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
What Happens to Hawai‘i Elders Who Don’t Have a Personal Safety Net?

 


Whether it’s job loss, illness, divorce or other life circumstances, some islanders find themselves at wit’s end, running out of money in retirement. What options do they have? And how are Hawai‘i taxpayers affected? What happens to Hawai‘i elders who don’t have a personal safety net?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

America in Black & Blue
A PBS NewsHour Weekend Special

America in Black & Blue, A PBS NewsHour Weekend Special

 

After a week of violence, grief and horror, with five police officers shot dead in Dallas, and two African American men shot dead by police officers in Minnesota and Louisiana, this news special will dig deep to explore the roots of these events, competing accounts of responsibility and justice, and televise the conversation that America is having around so many losses, mutual fears, and also around the common ground where progress may be made. Journalist Alison Stewart anchors, with reports from Newark, New Jersey and Minneapolis, Minnesota.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
What Should We Do with Hawai‘i’s Drug Offenders?


In Hawai‘i, a drug conviction can lead to jail time, especially when the drug is crystal
methamphetamine, the state’s top drug threat. Mandatory minimum prison sentences are
meant to deter trafficking, sale and use of crystal meth, but critics say drug treatment
might be a more effective and less expensive option than lock-up for non-violent offenders.
What should we do with Hawaii’s illegal drug offenders?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
How Are Innovators Finding Ways to Lift People Out of Homelessness in Hawai‘i?

 

As the state and counties look for solutions to the homeless crisis in Hawai‘i, some people are finding creative ways to give the homeless shelter and opportunity. From faith-based organizations to individuals providing rooms in their own homes, these innovators are blazing their own trails to help the homeless.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
How Have People Worked Their Way Out of Homelessness?

 

We see the tents lining the streets of Kaka‘ako and the encampments on the beaches, but what about what we don’t see? There are people in Hawai‘i who have worked their way out of homelessness, giving themselves and their family members an opportunity for a fresh start. What did it take for these formerly homeless people to create new lives for themselves?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
What Unique Challenges Face People Raising Children in a Homeless Environment?

 

For many of the nearly 800 families living in homelessness in Hawai‘i, raising children requires extra effort, sacrifice, and resourcefulness. Without permanent shelter, homeless parents must find creative ways to meet the basic needs of their children. What unique challenges face people raising children in a homeless environment?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
How Can Children Growing Up Homeless Break the Cycle?

 

Children usually rely on parents and guardians to provide homes where they can count on hot meals, warm showers, clean clothes and safe, secure shelter. But in Hawai‘i, many children are living with their families in homeless shelters, transitional housing or on the streets. How can these children get their basic needs met – staying fed, clean and healthy – while also keeping up with school and other activities that could open new avenues to success?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
What’s Standing Between Hawai‘i’s Veterans and Full Use of Their Benefits?

 

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has made numerous improvements since a 2014 audit showed Hawai‘i had the longest delays in the nation for veterans trying to see their doctors for the first time. But veterans say more needs to be done to ease the transition back into civilian life. What help is available for veterans who are trying to access health care, pensions, housing, and other government benefits and services? Where can they find support as they re-enter the job market?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

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