disease

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Influenza 1918

 

A flu like no other sweeps across the country, first starting at military bases bustling with war activity, then finding its way into the civilian population, killing indiscriminately and with alarming speed. But this isn’t fiction, or a dire prediction for this years flu season; its the story of Influenza 1918. It killed more Americans than all of the wars in the 20th Century combined, but faded from the collective memory almost as quickly as it spread across world.

 

The Gene Doctors

The Gene Doctors

 

Every year, a million babies are born worldwide with hereditary diseases. Physicians once had little to offer. But now a new breed of gene doctors is on the case. Devising treatments that target the root causes, they are transforming patients’ lives.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Deadly Addictions

 

The President has declared the opioid epidemic a national emergency. Overdoses involving heroin and pharmaceutical opioids killed more people last year than guns or car accidents, and are doing so at a pace faster than the H.I.V. epidemic at its peak. Has this widespread use of opioids and heroin taken hold in our Islands? Fifteen years ago we were the crystal meth capital of the country. Have we made any progress in shedding that dubious distinction?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and online via Facebook and Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

FRONTLINE
The Vaccine War

 

Join an investigation into the science and politics of vaccine safety. Despite a scientific consensus that there is no link between vaccines and disorders like autism, the war over whether to immunize children continues.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Vaccines and the Risk of Opting Out

 

On this episode of INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I, we’ll discuss Vaccines and the Risk of Opting Out.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

Forgotten Ellis Island

 

Visit the abandoned immigrant hospital on Ellis Island. During the great wave of immigration, 22 medical buildings sprawled across two islands adjacent to Ellis Island, the largest port of entry to the United States.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Rat Lungworm: What You Need to Know. What You Need to Do.

 

Rat lungworm, a parasite that causes a type of meningitis, has been behind at least 15 reported cases of the rare disease so far this year in Hawai‘i. By comparison, 11 cases were reported last year. Scientists and medical doctors say there have probably been more infections, but milder symptoms are difficult to differentiate from the flu or intestinal virus.

 

Experts say there are indicators that suggest that not only will more people become infected, but the illness will be more severe, as well, potentially leaving permanent nerve damage. What do they know – and what do they not know? How can you lower your risk? Several of the state’s leading experts on rat lungworm will be taking your questions.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

SPILLOVER –
Zika, Ebola & Beyond

 

Investigate the rise of spillover viruses like Zika, Ebola and Nipah that can make the leap from animals to humans. Find out how human behaviors spread diseases and what science can do to anticipate and prevent epidemics around the world.

 

A Royal Connection

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiBritain’s Queen Victoria, ruler of the most powerful nation in the world in her time, and Queen Emma of Hawai‘i, ali‘i of the most isolated archipelago, formed a friendship that bridged the long distance and the 17-year difference in their ages.

 

It was a friendship born of grief.

 

In the Hawaiian Journal of History, researcher Rhoda E.A. Hackler wrote about the queens’ 20-year, off-and-on correspondence.

 

Queen Victoria lost her husband and the father of their nine children when Prince-Consort Albert was just 42. The following year, the four-year-old son of Queen Emma and her husband, King Kamehameha IV (Alexander Liholiho), died of what was then described as “brain fever.” The child was named Albert, after Victoria’s husband.

 

Queen Victoria, still deeply mourning her husband’s death, reached out to Emma:

 

“As a mother you will understand how fully I am able to appreciate the depth of your grief…As a wife, I can sincerely hope that you may be spared the heavier blow which has plunged me into lifelong sorrow, but which makes my heart tenderly alive to all the sorrows of others.”

 

A year later, Emma wrote to Victoria:

 

“My heart is very, very heavy while I make known to Your Majesty that God has visited with me with that great trouble which in your kind and consoling letter you said you hoped I might be spared. On the 30th of November my Husband, of whose danger I had never entertained one thought, expired suddenly, almost while in the act of speaking to me, and it was a long while before they could make me believe that what I saw was death and that he had really left me alone for the remainder of my life.”

 

Victoria’s reply came quickly:

 

“…My bleeding heart can truly sympathize with you in your terrible desolation! A dear & promising only child & a beloved husband have both been taken from you within two years! Time does not heal the really stricken heart!..”

 

Two years after the death of Queen Emma’s husband, she traveled to England, raised money for the construction of the Cathedral of St. Andrew in Honolulu, and met Queen Victoria.

 

Victoria penned in her journal:

 

“Nothing could be nicer or more dignified than her manner…She was dressed in just the same widow’s weeds as I wear.”

 

Later in Emma’s trip, she was accorded the honor of being asked to spend the night at Windsor Castle.

 

Over the years, the queens shared personal news, much of it sad. Victoria lost a grandchild to diphtheria; Emma noted that typhoid fever was ravaging the Islands, killing “the young and the strong.”

 

Always, in this correspondence between royal “dear friends,” there is a sense of gratitude in being able to express profound loss and in being heard and understood.

 

Aloha a hui hou,
Leslie signature

 

NOVA
Can Alzheimer’s Be Stopped?

 

Alzheimer’s ravages the minds of over 40 million victims worldwide. Join scientists as they untangle the cause of this tragic illness and go behind the scenes of major drug trials to discover the therapies that may slow and even prevent the disease.

 

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