disease

HIKI NŌ
Outstanding Stories from Winter Quarter

 

This look back at some of the outstanding HIKI NŌ stories from the winter quarter of the 2014/2015 school year is hosted by two former HIKI NŌ interns, Akane Kashiwazaki and Terrence Nahina, now students at the University of Hawaii Academy for Creative Media.

 

Featured in this compilation show are:
A story from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui about McKayla Wandell, who grew up with a meth-addicted father and now uses what she has learned from that experience to help other teens cope with similar hardships through her talks at Maui TEDx conferences; a story from Wheeler Middle School on Oahu about eighth-grader Macy Walters’ quest to climb to the top of Mount Kilimanjaro, despite (and because of) the fact that she suffers from a rare autoimmune disease; a report from Moanalua High School on Oahu about why Hawaii’s high school students consume so much caffeine; a personal profile from King Intermediate School on Oahu about Aisha Yamamoto, a King Intermediate seventh-grader who loves using her skills as a DJ to get kids moving on the dance floor; a point-of-view report from Hoku Subiono of Kua o ka La PCS Milolii Hipuu Virtual Academy on Hawaii Island in which turns the lens on the controversial Thirty Meter Telescope project on Mauna Kea and his own struggles to reconcile his love of science with his Hawaiian heritage; a profile from Waianae Intermediate School on Oahu about Shardenei Luning, a young woman who finds similarities between her lives as a beauty pageant contestant and Pop Warner football player; and from Campbell High School on Oahu, the story of dancer Christian Jacob Nguyen, who uses his art-form to cope with the trauma of his parents’ divorce.

 

This program encores Saturday, Aug. 8 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, Aug. 9 at 3:00 pm.
You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

OPERATION WILD
Part 3 of 3

 

Join veterinary teams around the world as they undertake groundbreaking operations to try to save animals’ lives. Find out how pioneering human medicine is transforming ways to look after animals in some of the most remote places on earth. Witness dramatic stories of ingenuity, invention and dedication.

 

Part 3 of 3
Witness extreme dentistry on a five-ton elephant. Find out if a remarkable invention can help a dolphin swim again. And see a Galapagos tortoise receive keyhole surgery.

 

OPERATION WILD
Part 2 of 3


Join veterinary teams around the world as they undertake groundbreaking operations
to try to save animals’ lives. Find out how pioneering human medicine is
transforming ways to look after animals in some of the most remote places on
earth. Witness dramatic stories of ingenuity, invention and dedication.

 

Part 2 of 3
See a rhino’s groundbreaking skin graft after poachers stole her horns and an
orangutan’s micro-surgery to try to restore her sight and her freedom.

 

OPERATION WILD
Part 1 of 3

 

Join veterinary teams around the world as they undertake groundbreaking operations to try to save animals’ lives. Find out how pioneering human medicine is transforming ways to look after animals in some of the most remote places on earth. Witness dramatic stories of ingenuity, invention and dedication.

 

Part 1 of 3
Learn whether an ingenious idea could help save giant pandas, and if an operation deep in the jungle can transform the life of a young gorilla. Watch as an elephant with a gunshot wound makes an extraordinary journey.

 

HIKI NŌ
The first all-Middle School edition

 

This episode is the first all-Middle School edition of HIKI NŌ.

 

Top Story
Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui tell the story of their experience at the 2015 Student Television Network conference and video competition in San Diego, California, where they learned that it is far better to give than to receive. Although the primary purpose of their trip was to participate in the video competition, they also spent a great deal of time volunteering for worthy San Diego-based causes. Maui Waena students cleared half an acre of weeds and invasive plants from Balboa Park, the largest urban park in San Diego. They also served meals to 300 homeless people at the city’s largest homeless shelter, Father Joe’s Village. The Maui Waena students went on to win several awards at the competition, but they consider their hours of community service as the most rewarding part of the trip.

 

Also Featured:
Students from Aliamanu Middle School on Oahu report on the sometimes frightening transition from Middle School to High School.

 

Students from Waipahu Intermediate School on Oahu tell the story of a diabetic teacher at their school who is educating others about the disease.

 

Students at Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui profile their marching band director Richie Franco and his unconventional journey from the tough streets of Chicago to teaching music in Makawao, Maui.

 

Students at Waianae Intermediate School on Oahu tell the story of a student with a limp brought on by a medical condition that made her a target for bullies. With the support of friends and her own upbeat outlook, she is now moving forward to a positive future.

 

Students at Kapaa Middle School on Kauai invite us to their school’s Electives Night – a unique evening of student art and performances that excites not only students and their parents, but the entire community as well.

 

Students at Lahaina Intermediate School on Maui tell the story of a special garden on campus that is encouraging teachers and students alike to take their lessons outdoors.

 

This program encores Saturday, May 30 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, May 31 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

FRONTLINE
The Trouble with Chicken

 

FRONTLINE investigates the spread of dangerous pathogens in our meat – particularly poultry – and why the food-safety system isn’t stopping the threat. Focusing on an outbreak of salmonella Heidelberg at one of the nation’s largest poultry processors, the episode shows how contaminants are evading regulators and causing more severe illnesses at a time when Americans are consuming more chicken than ever.

 

CANCER: THE EMPEROR OF ALL MALADIES
A Conversation

Katie Couric moderates a roundtable conversation featuring Ken Burns; Sharon Percy Rockefeller, President and CEO of WETA and a cancer survivor; and Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of the book upon which the film is based.

CANCER: THE EMPEROR OF ALL MALADIES
Magic Bullets


Produced by Ken Burns and directed by Barak Goodman, Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies tells the comprehensive story of cancer, from its first description in an ancient Egyptian scroll to the gleaming laboratories of modern research institutions. The film is based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning book by Siddhartha Mukherjee, M.D.


The six-hour, three-part film interweaves a sweeping historical narrative with intimate stories about contemporary patients, and an investigation into the latest scientific breakthroughs that may have brought us, at long last, within sight of lasting cures.

 

Magic Bullets

The search for a “cure” for cancer is the greatest epic in the history of science, spanning centuries and continents, complete with heroes, villains and sudden twists. This episode follows that centuries-long search, but centers on the story of Sidney Farber, who, defying conventional wisdom in the late 1940s, introduces the modern era of chemotherapy, eventually galvanizing a full-scale national “war on cancer.” Interwoven with Farber’s narrative is the story of Olivia Blair, who at 14 months old is diagnosed with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, which spreads to her brain and spinal column.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Should Hawai‘i Require Vaccinations for All Healthy Children?


Measles outbreaks linked to unvaccinated children on the mainland have many in Hawai‘i questioning whether our vaccination requirements are strong enough to prevent an outbreak here. Although several vaccinations are required to attend public schools, parents who believe the shots are dangerous or unnecessary can seek exemptions for religious and medical reasons. But now that the nearly eradicated measles virus has returned, should exemptions for healthy children still be allowed? Malia Mattoch moderates this discussion.

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I is a live public affairs show that is also live streamed on PBSHawaii.org. Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email, Twitter or live blogging. You may also email your questions ahead of time toinsights@pbshawaii.org.

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
The Forgotten Plague


By the dawn of the 19th century, the deadliest killer in human history, tuberculosis, had killed one in seven of all the people who had ever lived. The disease struck America with a vengeance, ravaging communities and touching the lives of almost every family. The battle against the deadly bacteria had a profound and lasting impact on the country. It shaped medical and scientific pursuits, social habits, economic development, western expansion, and government policy. Yet both the disease and its impact are poorly understood: in the words of one writer, tuberculosis is our “forgotten plague.”

 

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