Dolphin

NOVA
Inside Animal Minds: Who’s the Smartest?

 

What would it be like to go inside the mind of an animal? We have all gazed into a creature’s eyes and wondered: what is it thinking about? What does it really know? Now, the revolutionary science of animal cognition is revealing hard evidence about how animals understand the world around them, uncovering their remarkable problem-solving abilities and exploring the complexity of their powers of communication and even their emotions. In this mini-series, NOVA explores these breakthroughs through three iconic creatures: dogs, birds and dolphins. We’ll travel into the spectacularly nuanced noses of dogs and wolves, and ask whether their reliance on different senses has shaped their evolution. We’ll see through the eyes of a starling in flight and test the tool-using skills of the smartest of birds, the crow. We’ll listen in as scientists track dolphins in the Caribbean and elephants on the African savannah, trying to unlock the secrets of animal communication. As we discover how researchers are pushing the animal mind to its limits, we’ll uncover surprising similarities to — and differences from — the human mind. What makes an animal smart? Many scientists believe the secret lies in relationships. Throughout the animal kingdom, some of the cleverest creatures – including humans – seem to be those who live in complex social groups, like dolphins, elephants and apes. Could the skills required to keep track of friend and foe make animals smarter? To find out, NOVA goes inside the social lives of some of the smartest animals on the planet.

 

 

 

RIVERS OF LIFE:
The Amazon

 

The Amazon, the greatest river system on Earth, amasses one-fifth of Earth’s freshwater as it flows east from the Andes to the Atlantic. Boiling streams, crystal clear lagoons, pink river dolphins and a strange new reef are some of its many secret and extreme worlds.

 

 

 

JOSEPH ROSENDO’S TRAVELSCOPE
Peru – The Amazon and Beyond

 

Joseph ships out on a Peruvian Amazon journey from the jungle town of Iquitos, and makes his way down one of the world’s wonders. One-fifth of the world’s water and oxygen are produced in the Amazon Rainforest and thousands of species of birds, fish, reptiles, mammals and plants as well as hundreds of thousands of people thrive there.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #822

 

TOP STORY:
Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu tackle the controversy surrounding commercial dolphin tours. On August 23, 2016, NOAA (the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) published a regulation prohibiting tour boats from being within 50 yards of a spinner dolphin, including swimming with them. This regulation has caused a major downturn in business for ocean tour companies such as Sea Hawaii, which claims it has seen a 90% decrease in revenues since the ruling was put into effect.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
–Middle school students from Island School on Kaua‘i teach us how to make a puka shell necklace.

 

–Students from Kalaheo High School in Windward O‘ahu tell us about a camp for the siblings of young cancer patients.

 

–Students from Mid-Pacific on O‘ahu introduce us to education innovator Ted Dintersmith.

 

–In their HIKI NŌ debut, students from Highlands Intermediate School on O‘ahu show us how to salsa dance.

 

–Students from President William McKinley High School in Honolulu tell the story of a McKinley alumnus and banker who has dedicated a great deal of his life to America’s pastime.

 

–Students at Wai‘anae Intermediate School in West O‘ahu report on a new program on their campus designed to get kids to show up for school.

 

–And the students at Kalani High School in East Honolulu feature a young tie-dye designer who channels the spirit of the 1960s in her clothing line.

 

This program encores Saturday, June 17, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, June 18, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Life in Captivity: Caring Confinement or Abuse?

 

With news of another dolphin encounter program coming to Hawai‘i, INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I examines the debate over marine mammals’ life in captivity. Is it right to hold marine mammals in captivity for entertainment or research purposes? Dolphins, sea lions, and seals are mainstay attractions at venues across the country. Proponents say the dolphins, sea lion, seals and other animals are safely cared for and they highlight the need for conservation; opponents say the animals suffer from overwork and abuse.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights