drug

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Deadly Addictions

 

The President has declared the opioid epidemic a national emergency. Overdoses involving heroin and pharmaceutical opioids killed more people last year than guns or car accidents, and are doing so at a pace faster than the H.I.V. epidemic at its peak. Has this widespread use of opioids and heroin taken hold in our Islands? Fifteen years ago we were the crystal meth capital of the country. Have we made any progress in shedding that dubious distinction?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and online via Facebook and Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

FRONTLINE
Hunting the Nightmare Bacteria

 

FRONTLINE investigates the alarming rise of untreatable infections: from a young girl thrust onto life support in an Arizona hospital, to a young American infected in India who comes home to Seattle, and an uncontrollable outbreak at the nation’s most prestigious hospital, where 18 patients were mysteriously infected and six died, despite frantic efforts to contain the killer bacteria. Fueled by decades of antibiotic overuse, the crisis has deepened as major drug companies, squeezed by Wall Street expectations, have abandoned the development of new antibiotics.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Prescription Painkillers: Use and Abuse

 

In Hawai‘i, an average of 50 people die each year from the abuse of prescription painkillers. Are doctors prescribing too many pills to help manage pain?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
The Road to Medical Marijuana

 

Hawai‘i legalized medical marijuana in 2000, but it’s been a long and bumpy road to establishing a dispensary system. The latest delay came on April 13, with the State Health Department saying it needs more time to access criminal histories of finalists for licenses to grow and sell medical marijuana. In the meantime, patients and caregivers have been growing their own cannabis.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

NOVA
Can Alzheimer’s Be Stopped?

 

Alzheimer’s ravages the minds of over 40 million victims worldwide. Join scientists as they untangle the cause of this tragic illness and go behind the scenes of major drug trials to discover the therapies that may slow and even prevent the disease.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
What Needs to be Done to Reduce Drug Abuse in Hawai‘i?

 

A decade after Hawai‘i’s high-profile War on Ice, crystal methamphetamine remains Hawai‘i’s No. 1 illegal drug threat. While prescription painkillers, heroin and other drugs are rising in use, officials say crystal meth is still linked to the most drug-trafficking crimes and the most drug-related deaths. INSIGHTS asks: what needs to be done to reduce drug abuse in Hawai‘i?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
When Will Hawai‘i’s Patients Be Able to Buy Medical Marijuana?

 

Since Hawai‘i approved marijuana for medical treatment 15 years ago, other states have surged ahead with dispensaries, and in some cases, marijuana decriminalization. Advocates are hoping for a statewide dispensary system, and concerned parents and law enforcement fear that medical marijuana could be abused. Mahealani Richardson moderates a talk with reps from advocacy groups, a drug policy organization and the Attorney General’s office.