editor

PBS Hawai‘i names Jody Shiroma as Vice President of Communications

PBS HAWAI‘I – News Release

315 Sand Island Access Rd.| p: 808.462.5000| pbshawaii.org
Honolulu, HI 96819-2295| f: 808.462.5090

 

For questions regarding this press release, contact:
Jody Shiroma
jshiroma@pbshawaii.org
808.462.5026­

 

February 7, 2019

 

Download this Press Release

 

Jody Shiroma, Vice President, Communications

 

(Honolulu, HI)—PBS Hawaiʻi’s new Vice President of Communications is Jody Shiroma, who will increase opportunities for community access, engagement and partnerships, and oversee the expansion of the multimedia station’s community advisory groups across the islands.

 

Shiroma brings more than 16 years of professional experience, most recently serving as Aloha United Way’s Vice President of Marketing and Communications for 12 years. Prior to that, she was Editor-in-Chief for Sassy and G Magazine, a local youth publication with over 25,000 in distribution.

 

Jody grew up in Hawaiʻi and is a graduate of the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa with a Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism with an emphasis in Ethnic Studies. She is a recipient of numerous business awards, including the Hawaiʻi Kai Jaycees’ Outstanding Young Person of the Year, Pacific Business News’ 40 under 40, Pacific Business News’ Women Who Mean Business, and the FBI Honolulu Division Director of Community Leadership Award. She served as a United Way Fellow in 2013.

 


PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. pbshawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii


 

 

PBS NEWSHOUR
Election Night Coverage 2018

 

PBS NewsHour will present live coverage of the 2018 Midterm Elections on Tuesday, November 6, 2018 starting at 3pm HST. This special broadcast will be anchored by managing editor Judy Woodruff, with a panel of studio guests to include syndicated columnist Mark Shields, New York Times columnist David Brooks, Cook Political Report national editor Amy Walter, editor and publisher of American Greatness Chris Buskirk, MoveOn.org senior adviser Karine Jean-Pierre, and PBS NewsHour Capitol Hill correspondent Lisa Desjardins.

 

PBS NEWSHOUR SPECIAL ELECTION DAY REPORT 2018. Host Judy Woodruff

 

Joining NewsHour’s coverage remotely will be PBS NewsHour White House correspondent Yamiche Alcindor at the White House; presidential historian Michael Beschloss; former DHS official Juliette Kayyem; Wilson Center Kennan Institute global fellow Nina Jankowicz; PBS NewsHour Weekend special correspondent Jeff Greenfield; and PBS NewsHour correspondents Amna Nawaz, William Brangham, Jeffrey Brown, and John Yang in the field and in Washington.

 

The special will also include reporting throughout the night on local and state elections in coordination with local PBS and NPR stations.

 

 

The Films of Eddie & Myrna Kamae,
From the Heart

All 10 films are available to watch below until April 6, 2018.

The Films of Eddie & Myrna Kamae - From the Heart

 

The Films of Eddie and Myrna Kamae, From the Heart is PBS Hawai‘i’s on-air and online film festival that showcases all 10 award-winning documentaries in the Kamaes’ Hawaiian Legacy Series, released between 1988 and 2007. Eddie Kamae, who passed away in January 2017, was well known for his contributions to Hawaiian music. With his wife Myrna, he also made films that perpetuated Hawai‘i’s cultural heritage for future generations.


 

Liʻa: Legacy of a Hawaiian Man

Liʻa: The Legacy of a Hawaiian Man

(1988)

This documentary celebrates the music and spirit of Big Island performer and composer, Sam Li‘a Kalainaina (1881-1975). It is also about a place, Waipi‘o Valley, and a life shaped and nourished by that place. This film’s world premiere opened the 1988 Hawai‘i International Film Festival.

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Those Who Came Before
: The Musical Journey of Eddie Kamae

Those Who Came Before: The Musical Journey of Eddie Kamae

(2009)

The Kamae’s final documentary pays tribute to the music of Hawaiians, whose gifts of knowledge helped guide Eddie Kamae. His pursuits led him to some of the most respected gate-keepers of the Hawaiian Renaissance: the author and translator Mary Kawena Pukui, the “Songwriter of Waipi‘o” Sam Li‘a, “Aloha Chant” author Pilahi Paki, and Hawaiian cultural resource Lilia “Mama” Hale. One by one, they entrusted him with key pieces of Hawai‘i’s musical heritage – inspiring him to understand, perform, and pass on to the children of Hawai‘i.

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Lahaina: 
Waves of Change

Lahaina: Waves of Change

(2007)

In 1999, Eddie Kamae visited Lahaina, only to find that Pioneer Mill, the center of Lahaina’s sugar industry, was closing down. It was the end of an era – a simpler, more innocent time that Eddie remembers from visiting his grandmother during childhood summers in Lahaina. Eddie leads us through many of the changes Lahaina has undergone, both historical and personal. And despite all of the radical changes and tumultuous times Lahaina has experienced, it remains a sacred Hawaiian place, not because of what has been built upon it, but because of what is in the hearts of people who live there.

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The History of the Sons of Hawai‘i

The History of the Sons of Hawaii

(2000)

This documentary tells the story of the charismatic band that helped launch the Hawaiian cultural renaissance. Spanning 40 years of Hawai‘i’s rich musical tradition, the film offers an intimate look at a unique group of performers and composers: their songs, their humor and their devotion to a sound that continues to convey something essential about the Hawaiian spirit.

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Kī hōʻalu Slack Key: The Hawaiian Way

Kī Hōʻalu: Slack Key, The Hawaiian Way

(1993)

Kī hō‘alu (slack key) is the Hawaiian way of making music. Performers and composers reveal how this unique style of playing conveys something essential about the Hawaiian spirit and the Hawaiian family tradition.

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Luther Kahekili Makekau: A One Kine Hawaiian Man

Luther Kahekili Makekau: A One Kine Hawaiian Man

(1997)

This documentary pays tribute to the untamed spirit of a colorful and controversial Hawaiian man. Known throughout the islands, Luther Makekau was part philosopher and part outlaw, a chanter and a singer, a fighter, a lover, a cattle rustler, a rebel and a poet. Born on Maui in 1890, during the reign of King Kalākaua, he lived nearly 100 years, shaped by a century of turbulent cultural change.

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Listen to the Forest

Listen to the Forest

(1991)

This environmental documentary speaks of the widespread concern for rainforest preservation, while reminding us of traditional Hawaiian values. Interviews, chants, and original songs and dances give voice to an older form of ecological wisdom summed up in the phrase “mālama ‘āina,” to take care of the land.

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HAWAIIAN VOICES
: Bridging Past to Present

Hawaiian Voices: Bridging Past to Present

(1998)

This documentary honors the role of kūpuna (elders) in preserving Hawaiian culture. It focuses on the legacies of three respected Hawaiian elders whose lives bridged the transition from older times into the late 20th century. They are Ruth Makaila Kaholoa‘a, age 93, of the Big Island; Lilia Wahinemaika‘i Hale, age 85, of O‘ahu and Molokai; and Reverend David “Kawika” Ka‘alakea, age 78, of Maui. Each is a living archive of invaluable lore and recollection, a treasure whose stories, memories and perspectives need to be shared as a way of bringing the healing wisdom of the past into the often fragmented world of the present.

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WORDS, EARTH & ALOHA: The Source of Hawaiian Music

Words, Earth & Aloha: The Source of Hawaiian Music

(1995)

In Hawai‘i, music has always been much more than a form of entertainment. Through the centuries, it has been a primary means of cultural continuity. This documentary pays tribute to a wide range of composers who flourished between the 1870s and the 1920s, and for whom Hawaiian was still a first language. The film explores the poetry and play of Hawaiian lyrics, as well as the places and features of the natural world that inspired songs still loved and listened to today.

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KEEPERS OF THE FLAME: The Cultural Legacy of Three Hawaiian Women

Keepers of the Flame: The Cultural Legacy of Three Hawaiian Women

(2005)

This documentary chronicles the lives of three Hawaiian women who helped to save the Hawaiian culture, which was in serious peril. The combined artistry and aloha of Mary Kawena Pukui, ‘Iolani Luahine and Edith Kanaka‘ole “helped to revive the flame of traditional Hawaiian culture – a flame that had almost died,” says Eddie Kamae in his on-camera introduction to the film.

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What I Learned: Aliamanu Middle School

 

 

Aliamanu Middle School 8th graders Jonny Parr and Renaecia Deleon-Guerrero discussed what they learned working together on the HIKI NŌ story about military moms. Jonny was the reporter and co-editor. Renaecia was the main editor and writer; the story was about her mother, who is in the military. Aliamanu Middle School media teacher Chris Facuri also comments on what he felt his students learned from the experience.

 

 

Interview Transcript

 

What I Learned: Saint Francis School

 

 

Saint Francis School HIKI NŌ students Alexander Tumalip, Jason Sonido, and Michael Delicata discuss what they learned working together on the HIKI NŌ story about Hawaiian weapons expert Manny Mattos. Alexander was the interviewer and co-editor, Jason was the script-writer and co-editor, and Michael was the reporter. Saint Francis School media teacher Ryan Ragus also comments on what he felt his students learned from the experience.

 

 

Interview Transcript

 

What I Learned: Waianae High School

 

 

Waianae High School juniors Jaena Campos and Chrisann Rabanes, along with senior Mahealani Nieto-Lopes, discuss what they learned from working together on the HIKI NŌ story “Parental Guidance Required”, about a female wrestler’s conflicts with her overbearing, former wrestler father. Jaena was the camera operator, Chrisann was a co-writer, and Mahealani was the editor. Media teacher John Allen III also comments on what he felt his students learned from the experience.

 

 

Interview Transcript

 

What I Learned: Kalani High School

 

 

Kalani High School juniors Anya Carroll and Arron Nie discuss what they learned from working together on the HIKI NŌ story about The Canvas—a place where students from all schools can get together and interact. Anya was the co-writer, co-editor, and reporter on the story. Arron was also a co-writer and co-editor. Kalani High School HIKI NŌ teacher Anne Torige also comments on what she feels her students learned from the experience.

 

 

Interview Transcript

 

What I Learned: Waianae Intermediate School

 

 

Waianae Intermediate School 8th graders Amee Neves and Fabryanna Manumaleuna discuss what they learned from working together on the HIKI NŌ story “A Home for Larenzo” about a student leader at the Waianae Boys & Girls club who was found out to be homeless but currently has a home. Amee was the reporter and editor on the story. Fabryanna was co-editor and worked on the crew. Media teacher Luane Higuchi comments on what she felt her students learned from the HIKI NŌ experience.

 

 

Interview Transcript

 

What I Learned: Sacred Hearts Academy

 

 

Sacred Hearts Academy juniors Kailanianna Ablog and Mariko Gaulton discuss what they learned from working together on the HIKI NŌ story about Sacred Hearts science teacher Erin Flynn. Kailanianna was the reporter, co-editor, and writer on the story. Mariko was camera operator and co-editor. Sacred Hearts journalism and media teacher Alyssa Myers also comments on what she felt her students learned from the experience.

 

 

Interview Transcript