elementary

HIKI NŌ 3|5|20: 2020 Winter Challenge High School Division | Program

 

This special edition features stories from the High School Division of the 2020 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge. On January 31, 2020, participating elementary, middle school and high school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the prompt: “The wisdom of elders brought to life by the young.” Teachers could not provide hands-on help. The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own. The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

1.) How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?

2.) How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?

3.) How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, First-Place, Second-Place, Third-Place, and Honorable Mention awards were given in both the middle school and high school divisions. The following High School Division awardees will be featured in this special:

 

–First Place in the High School Division:

 

“The Show Goes On”
The challenge team from Maui High School tells the story of a dance instructor whose love for the art form inspires generations of passionate dancers to continue the cycle of knowledge and inspiration.

 

HIKI NŌ 3|5|20: 2020 Winter Challenge High School Division | Program

 

–Second Place in the High School Division:

 

“Major Advice”
The challenge team from Waimea High School on Kauaʻi tells the story of a retired Army major who empowers generations of JROTC cadets to achieve their goals and become leaders by looking out for their welfare and teaching them hallmarks of success.

 

–Third Place in the High School Division:

 

“More Than Just a Language”
The challenge team from Hilo High School on the Big Island tells the story of a high school student who learned more than language and cultural traditions from her Hawaiian language class. Along with the special bond she formed with her teacher and class, she gained morals and values that she wishes to pass on to her younger brother and those after him.

 

–Honorable Mention in the High School Division:

 

”Intergenerational Practices”
The challenge team from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tells the story of a Japanese folk dance teacher and a student whose passion for perpetuating the Japanese tradition makes his family and community members proud.

 

HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge stories from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu and Kauaʻi High School are also featured.

 

“No Cost for Kindness”
The challenge team from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu tells the story of a student who learned respect and kindness at home and practices these lessons at school by helping kids in need.

 

“Mālama Huleʻia: Preserving the Past”
The challenge team from Kauaʻi High School tells the story of a non-profit organization that relies on the wisdom and traditions of elders to connect with the past, revitalize Hawaiian lands, and teach the community youth to take care of the environment for years to come.

 

First-place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Second-place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Third-place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Honorable mention winners will receive $100 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 2|27|20:
2020 Winter Challenge Middle School Division | Program

 

This special edition features stories from the Middle School division of the 2020 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge.  On January 31, 2020, participating elementary, middle school and high school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the prompt: “The wisdom of elders brought to life by the young.”   Teachers could not provide hands-on help.  The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own.  The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

1.) How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?
 
2.) How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?
 
3.) How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, First-Place, Second-Place, Third-Place, and Honorable Mention awards were given in both the middle school and high school divisions. The following Middle School Division awardees will be featured in this special:

 

–First Place in the Middle School Division:

 

“Misfit Martial Arts Instructor”
The challenge team from ʻEwa Makai Middle School on Oʻahu tells the story of a martial arts instructor who passes down to his students life lessons he’s learned during his rocky youth.

 

–Second Place in the Middle School Division:

 

“Piano Teacher”
The challenge team from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School tells the story ofa grandmother who has taught piano to two generations of her family, as well as scores of other Maui residents.

 

–Third Place in the Middle School Division:

 

“Coach Jensen”
The challenge team from Waiākea Elementary School on Hawaiʻi Island tells the story of a baseball stand-out who, because of his short stature, channeled his passion for the sport from playing to coaching.  Because there is not a separate elementary school division for HIKI NŌ challenges, elementary schools compete in the Middle School Division.  This is the first time an elementary school has placed in a HIKI NŌ Challenge.

 

–Honorable Mention in the Middle School Division:

 

”Ongaeshi: Giving Back”

 

The challenge team from Highlands Intermediate School on Oʻahu tells the story of a judo sensei who is passing his knowledge of this form of martial art to his children.

 

HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge stories from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui,Kealakehe Intermediate School in Kona, and Kapaʻa Middle School on Kauaʻi are also featured.

 

First-place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Second-place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Third-place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
HIKI NŌ Class of 2019, Part Two

 

This is the second of four specials in which outstanding HIKI NŌ graduates from the Class of 2019 (and one student from the Class of 2020) gathered at PBS Hawaiʻi to discuss their HIKI NŌ experiences and how they feel the skills they learned from HIKI NŌ will help them in college, the workplace and life.

 

This episode features Kera Rasavanh, who graduated from McKinley High School in Honolulu and is now a Business Marketing and Digital Cinema major at UH Mānoa; Drake Dela Cruz, who graduated from Farrington High School in Honolulu and is now a Film and TV Production major at Leeward Community College on Oʻahu; and Serene Morales, who graduated from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui and is now majoring in Digital Cinema at UH Mānoa.

 

Each graduate also shows a HIKI NŌ story that they worked on and discusses what they learned from the experience of working on that particular story. Kera shares her story “Hawaii Nature Center,” about an ʻāina-based education center in Makiki, Oʻahu that teaches elementary and middle school children how to care for the environment. Drake shows “Betty Santoki,” about a 1962 Farrington graduate who has dedicated her life to keeping Japanese culture alive in her community. Serene presents her story “Justin Yanagida,” about a Maui-based fitness coach who uses struggles from his own past to motivate others to turn their lives around.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
HIKI NŌ Class of 2018 Special, Part 3 of 4

HIKI NŌ Class of 2018 — Part 3 of 4

 

This is the third of four specials in which outstanding HIKI NŌ graduates from the Class of 2018 gathered at PBS Hawai‘i to discuss their HIKI NŌ experiences and how they feel the skills they learned from HIKI NŌ will help them in college, the workplace and life.

 

Part 3 features Katherine Swor, who graduated from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui and is now majoring in elementary education at Saint Martin’s College in Lacey, Washington; Caleb Casinas, who graduated from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu and is now majoring in accounting and management at Norwich University in Vermont; and Haven Luper-Jasso, who graduated from Kaua‘i High School in Līhu‘e and is now majoring in film production at Chapman University in Orange, California.

 

 

To start the show, each graduate shows a HIKI NŌ story that they worked on and discusses what they learned from the experience of working on that particular story. Katherine presents her story “Bi-Polar Artist,” about a young woman who uses her art to express herself and cope with her bi-polar disorder. Caleb shows “Heart Over Height,” about a high school student who excels in soccer, despite the physical limitations brought on by a rare form of dwarfism. Haven presents her story “Bethany Hamilton,” which she created as a 7th grader at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School, about the Kaua‘i surfer who became a celebrity after losing an arm in a shark attack.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 918: Jerome Ribao and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui trace a fellow student’s road to recovery after he was hit by a drunk driver. In May 2017, Baldwin senior Jerome Ribao suffered a severe leg injury from the accident. Despite this setback, Jerome found ways to remain active. After graduation, Jerome plans to continue to work toward his career goal of becoming an auto mechanic.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Aliamanu Middle School on O‘ahu explore the fears and anxieties faced by students transitioning from elementary to middle school. (From the HIKI NŌ archives.)

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu profile a marching band director who encourages students not to be the best students in the world, but to be the best people for the world. (From the HIKI NŌ archives.)

 

–Students from Waimea High School on Kaua‘i tell the story of a Waimea graduate who became a successful t-shirt artist and returned to his home-town to give back to his community. (From the HIKI NŌ archives.)

 

–Students from Montessori School of Maui in Makawao show how to create a device that will occupy and entertain cats for hours on end.

 

–Students from Konawaena High School on Hawai‘i Island show how a sport with origins from Native American Indians is growing in popularity on their island.

 

–And students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i tell the story of a quadriplegic artist who has developed a unique way of painting. (From the HIKI NŌ archives.)

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students at Kapa‘a Middle School in Līhu‘e, Kaua‘i.

 

 

Nature Cat

 

NATURE CAT FOLLOWS FRED, A HOUSE CAT WHO DREAMS OF EXPLORING THE GREAT OUTDOORS.

 

In each episode, once his family leaves for the day, Fred transforms into Nature Cat, “backyard explorer extraordinaire.” Nature Cat can’t wait to get outside for a day of backyard nature excursions and bravery, but there’s one problem: he’s still a house cat with no instincts for nature. Like many of today’s kids, Nature Cat is eager and enthusiastic about outside activities, but is at times intimidated by them. With the help of his animal friends, Nature Cat embarks on action-packed adventures that include exciting missions full of nature investigation, “a-ha” discovery moments and humor, all while inspiring children to go outside and “play the show.”

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Does Fine Arts Education Have a Place in Hawai‘i’s Public Schools?

 

Federal and state mandates have compelled public schools to focus more time and resources on academic standards and less on the fine arts. Are we shortchanging students by not giving them an outlet for creative expression? Has fine arts education fallen by the wayside with the push to excel in critical thinking in Hawai‘i’s public schools?

 

 

Word Girl

 

WORDGIRL follows the everyday life and superhero adventures of WordGirl as she fights crime and enriches vocabulary usage. Disguised as mild-mannered fifth grader, Becky Botsford, WordGirl possesses superhero strength with the added benefit of a colossal vocabulary. She is joined in her adventures by a monkey sidekick named Captain Huggy Face.

 

 

Each episode introduces up to four new vocabulary words in an engaging, humorous way. WordGirl is a superhero spoof so the storylines are funny takes of familiar stories from that genre.

 

 

For children 6 to 8 years old.

 
Visit the Web site: http://pbskids.org/wordgirl

 

 

Series Goals

  • To help build children’s deep word knowledge and engender a lifelong enthusiasm for language
  • To offer direct instruction of important targeted vocabulary words presented in multiple and interesting contexts in order to build children’s deep word knowledge and overall vocabulary interest
  • To provide role-models for children illustrating the power of words within a rewarding social/emotional and cultural context

 

 

Helping Kids Prepare for School
WordGirl teaches new vocabulary words to children in a variety of fun and interesting contexts. The program enriches young audiences’ vocabulary, closes the gap for those who don’t grow up in language-rich environments, instills a love of language, and fosters better reading comprehension.

 

 

Where to Watch
Find out when WordGirl airs in your area, and also get episode descriptions and related activities!