equipment

HIKI NŌ 11|21|19:
2019 Fall Challenge

 

This special edition features stories from the 2019 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge.  On October 18, 2019, participating elementary, middle school and high school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the prompt: “Half of Hawaiʻi’s people are struggling financially even while many work two or three jobs.  Produce a story about a person or group of people who are dealing with this predicament.”   Teachers could not provide hands-on help.  The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own.  The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

1.) How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?

2.) How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?

3.) How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, first-place, second-place and third-place awards were given in both the middle school and high school divisions. The following awardees will be featured in the special:

 

First Place in the High School Division:

“Chazz’s World”

The challenge team from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tells the story of Chazz—a high school student who has to work at a pizza parlor to help his family pay the bills.  The story explores the stress and other emotional hardships the situation causes for Chazz.

 

First Place in the Middle School Division:

“Working for Love”

The challenge team from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School tells the story of a wife and husband who are both full-time teachers yet have to work additional jobs in order to make ends meet. (She cleans condos and he runs a yard service.)

 

Second Place in the High School Division:

“For the Family”

The challenge team from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu tells the story of a woman who lost her husband to leukemia and must now raise her daughters as a single mother.

 

Second Place in the Middle School Division:

“Hero Mom”

The challenge team from Maui Waena Intermediate School tells the story of a woman who holds down three jobs to support her family and whose dedication and sacrifice has made her a hero in her daughter’s eyes.

 

Third Place in the High School Division:

“Handling Hawaiʻi’s Financial Demands”

The challenge team from Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi tells the story of two young people who perform in a Polynesian revue but also hold down additional jobs to make ends meet.

 

Third Place in the Middle School Division:

“Go Jimmy Go”

The challenge team from Highlands Intermediate School on Oʻahu tells the story of a saxophone player who heads a very successful, nationally touring musical group but who also teaches at Highlands Intermediate to earn enough money to support his family.

 

First-place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Second-place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Third-place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
2019 HIKI NŌ Spring Challenge

 

This special edition features stories from the 2019 HIKI NŌ Spring Challenge. On April 26, 2019, participating middle school and high school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the theme: “The unappreciated beauty of simple, everyday things.” Teachers could not provide hands-on help. The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own. The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

1.) How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?

2.) How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?

3.) How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, first-place, second-place and third-place awards were given in both the middle school and high school divisions. An honorable mention prize was awarded if the judges felt that a story which did not place first, second or third deserved special recognition. The following awardees will be featured in the special:

 

HIKI NO #1019: HIKI NŌ Spring Challenge

 

First Place in the High School Division: Moanalua High School on Oʻahu features sophomore Rogue Williams, who has cerebral palsy and other physical conditions that make walking a challenge. Rogue expresses how the simple act of walking can be taken for granted.

 

First Place in the Middle School Division: Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui features a mixed-martial-arts trainer who has come to appreciate the simple joys of his extended family of co-workers and clients.

 

Second Place in the High School Division: Maui High School in Kahului tells how residents of a domestic violence shelter have come to appreciate the simple joy of being in a safe place.

 

Second Place in the Middle School Division: Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani spotlights a business that brings back the simple, everyday joy of having fun.

 

Third Place in the High School Division: Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi features a water safety officer who remembers to appreciate the simple beauty of the ocean.

 

Third Place in the Middle School Division: Ewa Makai Middle School on Oʻahu focuses on the beauty in the simple, commonplace ritual of lei-giving.

 

An Honorable Mention in the High School Division was awarded to Kalāheo High School in Windward Oʻahu for their study of a simple, everyday beauty product: lipstick.

 

First-place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Second-place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Third-place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. The Honorable mention winner will receive $100 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
#1013 – The 2019 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge

HIKI NŌ 1013: The 2019 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge

 

This special edition features stories from the 2019 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge. On February 1, 2019, 12 participating middle school teams and nine participating high school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the Hawaiian value of kuleana (to take responsibility). Teachers could not provide hands-on help. The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own. The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

Program

 

1.) How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?
2.) How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?
3.) How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, first-place, second-place and third-place awards were given in both the middle school and high school divisions. An honorable mention prize was awarded if the judges felt that a story which did not place first, second or third deserved special recognition. The following awardees will be featured in the special:

 

–First Place in the High School Division: Kalāheo High School in Windward O‘ahu focuses on the importance of taking responsibility while driving. Their story is framed by the recent traffic fatalities in the Kaka‘ako neighborhood of O‘ahu and how that tragedy sparked a family’s memories of losing their daughter in a drunk driving incident.

 

–First Place in the Middle School Division: Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului features a food truck owner who starts a pay-it-forward campaign to help feed workers affected by the recent federal government shutdown.

 

–Second Place in the High School Division: Maui High School in Kahului tells the behind-the-scenes story of a locally produced feature film titled Kuleana.

 

–Second Place in the Middle School Division: Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu shines a spotlight on the B.R.A.V.E. (Be Respectful and Value Everyone), a non-profit organization whose mission is to raise awareness about bullying and spread the values of respect and kindness.

 

–Third Place in the High School Division: H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui profiles Sea Walls Maui, an art/activism program that promotes awareness of environmental issues through the painting of outdoor murals.

 

–Third Place in the Middle School Division: Volcano School of Arts and Sciences on Hawai‘i Island focuses on stewards of a sacred beach in Ka‘ū.

 

–An Honorable Mention in the Middle School Division was awarded to Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani for their story on a pharmacist who dedicates himself to serving the Native Hawaiian community.

 

First-place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

Second-place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

Third-place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

Honorable mention winners will receive $100 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW
Bismarck, ND, Part 3 of 3

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW plants itself in Bismarck, North Dakota, and host Mark L. Walberg and appraiser Ken Farmer visit a farm where the main crop is farm-related collectibles. A letter written by George Washington and two Irish dragoon swallowtail guidon flags are appraised.

 

 

POV
Do Not Resist

 

A vital and influential exploration of the rapid militarization of the police in the United States. Do Not Resist puts viewers in the center of the action — from inside a police training seminar that teaches the importance of “righteous violence” to the floor of a congressional hearing on the proliferation of military equipment in small-town police departments.

 

 

Restoring Best Picture Quality

PBS Hawai'i: Restoring Best Picture QualityWe’ll get there. Resilience is in our DNA

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiThe people of Hawai‘i bought us a $30 million new home. You provided us a forward-looking physical plant and the stability of property ownership.

 

And, of course, you now expect us to “bring it” with more and more quality content and higher and higher production values. That’s our expectation, too!

 

The last thing you want to see is reduced picture quality on shows that you love.

 

Understood. And yet, you may have experienced intermittent pixelation (that’s when individual pixels in a digitized image stand out) and sporadic, brief audio disruptions, all since PBS Hawai‘i moved into our new home with major, new technology systems.

 

First, I want to apologize to you for the blemishes in your viewing experience. Second, I’d like to explain. Third, I want you to know we have been working constantly, and repeatedly seeking help from network specialists, to eliminate the problems. And fourth, we have reason to believe that a solution is imminent.

 

As I write this, Level 3 Communications is arranging for a larger dedicated fiber circuit to transport our content. Level 3’s service to this local public television station repeatedly fell through the cracks following the telecom giant’s $5.7 billion acquisition of our previous provider, TW Telecom. We experienced critical delays as Level 3 worked to integrate TW Telecom into its fold and laid off staff. Level 3’s challenges in absorbing TW persisted as PBS Hawai‘i relocated to our new building and launched a long-planned transformation of our engineering model.

 

Our new model is something we’re excited about, because it allows us to spend less money to distribute our programming on today’s multiple media platforms – and frees up more resources for quality content. Our new systems rely upon dedicated access to an undersea, overland fiber optic network that runs through a Joint Master Control Center, called Centralcast, in Syracuse, New York. We’re creating programming expressly for Hawai‘i while sharing “back-office” tech costs with our PBS nonprofit peers.

 

Using this data highway shouldn’t have presented roadblocks in the Age of Fiber, but timing is everything: Our contracted fiber provider, TW Telecom, found itself going through a wrenching ownership transition. We sense that the layoffs may have resulted in a loss of institutional knowledge about projects already underway. For three months since our move to our new building, we experienced new owner Level 3’s lack of communication and responsiveness while our picture and audio quality suffered.

 

“This wasn’t managed properly. I don’t know why – we know how to do this. We’ll take care of it,” Level 3’s new Hawai‘i sales director Anthony Compiseno assured us when we met for the first time on August 8. He told us that we’d been assigned an unsuitable network setting – and arranged to test higher bandwidth capability (300mb or megabits per second, versus 200mb on our existing pipe), with a “pseudowire” enhancement to protect our broadcasting content. By the time you read this, our picture quality may already have returned.

 

You and other viewers have gone through this trying time of intermittent broadcast disruptions with us.

 

PBS Hawai‘i sends you our gratitude and aloha, for your patience and your continued faith in our programming.

 

We’ll get there. Resilience is in our DNA.

 

Mahalo piha,
Leslie signature

PBS Hawai'i: Restoring Best Picture Quality