exchange

Connecting through Storytelling

 

CEO Message

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO

Over the course of 13 years as CEO of PBS Hawaiʻi, I’ve had ample opportunity to experience something very delightful about our viewers:

 

Many of them are every bit as compelling in communicating as our professional storytellers.

 

Good storytellers know their audience. They know how to connect with emotion and imagination. I think that’s why many of our programs evoke strong responses; and it’s why our viewers’ letters “get” to us.

 

In correspondence, some of our viewers relate family stories passed down through the generations, describing intimate conversations at pivotal times of history, such as the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy, the Pearl Harbor attack and closely fought elections.

 

CEO Message: Connecting through Storytelling

 

It’s a wonderful exchange – viewers writing to amplify something they saw in one of our programs, or to add context, or to riff on a related thought. Often they’re telling of their own experience, after a story that aired on PBS Hawaiʻi has struck a chord in their life.

 

Responding to PBS NewsHour coverage of the crackdown on immigrants seeking shelter and work in the U.S., a Honolulu viewer wrote that more immigrants should be welcomed: “My grandfather, who came from Japan, worked from morning to night for three dollars a day. I am third generation and educated … I will not work at a job where I get dirty. I will not work at a job where I get smelly. I will not work at a job that requires me to carry more than five pounds. I am a typical third-generation immigrant.”

 

Another viewer reached out after seeing the American Experience episode about the Pacific search for Amelia Earhart. Just as if she were having an in-person conversation, she noted that the investigation didn’t seem to include the hypothesis that the ocean had swallowed all trace of evidence.

 

“I think that is really what happened,” she wrote. “But empirical research is never really satisfied with a ‘nothing’ outcome. There has to be something ‘real.’ And more importantly, there has to be ‘closure,’ which may not be true.”

 

As author Annette Simmons said, “Story gives people enough space to think for themselves. The story develops and grows in the mind of the listener …”

 

We’re all the richer for connecting through storytelling.

 

Mahalo nui,

Leslie signature

 

 

Ex Libris:
The New York Public Library

 

Frederick Wiseman’s film, Ex Libris – The New York Public Library, goes behind the scenes of one of the greatest knowledge institutions in the world and reveals it as a place of welcome, cultural exchange and learning. With 92 branches throughout Manhattan, the Bronx and Staten Island, the library is a resource for all the inhabitants of this multifaceted and cosmopolitan city, and beyond.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #824

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ highlights some of the best stories from the spring quarter of the 2016-2017 school year. The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this compilation show include:

 

“Mochi Pounding” from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui:
The story of a Maui family who continues their annual New Year’s tradition of mochi pounding, despite the recent passing of the family matriarch.

 

“Tough Vice-Principal” from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu:
A classic “don’t judge a book by its cover” story about a vice-principal whose tough exterior belies her heart of gold.

 

“Fashion Entrepreneurs” from Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu:
Two Honolulu-based fashion entrepreneurs mentor young local designers who are trying to break into the business.

 

“Tie-Dye Artist” from Kalani High School in East Honolulu:
Inspired by 1960s cultural icons like The Beatles, a Honolulu teenager launches her own line of tie-dye clothing.

 

“Diabetic Athlete” from Waiakea High School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island:
A star high school athlete faces his toughest opponent off the court: Type 1 Diabetes.

 

“Pedestrian Walking Flags” from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu:
A woman takes it upon herself to sew red flags that are held up by pedestrians as they cross the notoriously dangerous crosswalks in Waiʻanae. The red flags go a long way in alerting drivers that there are pedestrians crossing in front of them.

 

“The Fact of You” from Kaua‘i High School in Lihue:
A personal essay about identifying one’s authentic nature and remaining true to it.

 

“Ukrainian Student” from Nānākuli High and Intermediate School in West O‘ahu:
The story of a foreign exchange student from Ukraine who embraces and reciprocates the Aloha Spirit she finds in Nānākuli.

 

This special compilation show is hosted by Moanalua High School student Camryn Tabiolo, who will be entering her school’s HIKI NŌ program in the fall of 2017.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 2, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 3, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.