expression

INDEPENDENT LENS
Out of State

INDEPENDENT LENS: Out of State

 

Shipped thousands of miles away from Hawaiʻi to a private prison in the Arizona desert, two Native Hawaiians discover their indigenous traditions from a fellow inmate serving a life sentence.

 

Learn more about the filmmaker

 

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PACIFIC HEARTBEAT
SEASON 8 Programming

 

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT LOGO

 

Now in its eighth season, the anthology series PACIFIC HEARTBEAT brings the authentic Pacific – people, cultures, languages, music and contemporary issues – to your screen. This new season brings stories of determination and courage from Australia, Rapa Nui (Easter Island), Tonga and the U.S. The series is a production of Pacific Islanders in Communications in partnership with PBS Hawai‘i, and is distributed nationally by American Public Television.

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT SEASON 8: Te Kuhane o te Tupuna (The Spirit of the Ancestors)

Te Kuhane o te Tupuna (The Spirit of the Ancestors)
Sat., May 4, 8:00 pm
Encore: Thurs., May 9, 10:00 pm

This documentary film is a journey from Easter Island to London, in search of the lost Moai Hoa Haka Nanaia, a statue of significant cultural importance. It explores the social and political landscape of the island of Rapanui as the people attempt to claim back what is rightfully theirs: their land and a lava-rock image of tremendous presence, representing one of the world’s most extraordinary cosmological views.

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT SEASON 8: Corridor Four

Corridor Four
Sat., May 11, 8:00 pm
Encore: Thurs., May 16, 10:00 pm

Corridor Four is a documentary that illustrates Isaac Ho‘opi‘i’s story in the aftermath of 9/11. After all the news cameras had turned off and all the lights had dimmed, Isaac was left only with the horrific images he had seen and the memory of those he was unable to save. His is a story not of a hero basking in the glory of his past deeds, but of a human being filled with regret that he couldn’t change something completely out of his control.

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT SEASON 8: Prison Songs

Prison Songs
Sat., May 18, 8:00 pm
Encore: Thurs., May 23, 10:00 pm

The people imprisoned in a Darwin jail are shown in a unique and completely new light in Australia’s first ever documentary musical. Incarcerated in tropical Northern Territory, over 800 inmates squeeze into the overcrowded spaces of Berrimah Prison. In an Australian first, the inmates share their feelings, faults and experiences in the most extraordinary way – through song.

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT SEASON 8: Leitis in Waiting

Leitis in Waiting
Sat., May 25, 8:00 pm
Encore: Thurs., May 30, 10:00 pm

Leitis in Waiting tells the story of Tonga’s evolving approach to gender fluidity through a character-driven portrait of the most prominent leiti (transgender) in the Kingdom, Joey Mataele, a devout Catholic of noble descent. Over the course of an eventful year, Joey organizes a beauty pageant, mentors a young leiti who is rejected by her family, and attempts to work with fundamentalist Christians regarding Tonga’s anti-sodomy and cross-dressing laws. Her story reveals what it means to be different in a deeply religious and conservative society, and what it takes to be accepted without giving up who you are.

Related: See interview with the filmmakers of Leitis in Waiting by Emily Bodfish, PBS Hawaiʻi

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT SEASON 8: Let's Play Music! Slack Key With Cyril Pahinui and Friends

Let’s Play Music! Slack Key With Cyril Pahinui and Friends
Sat., June 1, 8:00 pm
Encore: Thurs., June 6, 10:00 pm

Master slack key musician Cyril Pahinui, jams with some of the most revered and talented musicians in Hawai‘i in intimate kanikapila style backyard performances. Cyril was the son of Gabby “Pop” Pahinui, who is considered the “Godfather” of Hawaiian slack key guitar and whose music was featured prominently in the Academy Award winning film, The Descendants. Cyril Pahinui passed away on November 17, 2018; this broadcast is dedicated to him.

 

 

 

ARTBOUND
La Raza

ARTBOUND: La Raza

 

In East Los Angeles during the late 1960s and 1970s, a group of young activists used creative tools like writing and photography as a means for community organizing, providing a platform for the Chicano Movement in the form of the bilingual newspaper/magazine La Raza. In the process, the young activists became artists themselves and articulated a visual language that shed light on the daily life, concerns and struggles of the Mexican-American experience in Southern California and provided a voice to the Chicano Rights Movement.

 

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Hula as a Bedrock of 21st-Century Success

 

CEO Message

 

Hula as a Bedrock of 21st-Century Success

 

This month, the renowned musical Lim Family of Kohala on the Big Island takes the stage on Nā Mele: Traditions in Hawaiian Song (Mon., Jan. 28, 7:30 pm). We at PBS Hawai‘i have wanted to feature this remarkable ‘ohana for years.

 

However, it’s not easy to catch the family members in one place for long! They’re often in different parts of the Islands, and in farflung countries, in versatile groups, performing and teaching. Ed Yap, a family musician and husband of fellow performer and kumu hula Nani Lim Yap, is known for his flying fingers, booking and re-booking airline tickets online as plans evolve.

 

As I interviewed Nani for an upcoming episode of Long Story Short (Tues., Jan. 22, 7:30 pm), I saw once again, with another Island family, that the tradition of hula can serve as a bedrock for modern business success. Nani has long been in demand as a hula teacher in Japan and now, China, for her deep knowledge of this ancient art.

 

“(Hula) is about the collective, and it is about recognizing that together, we produce something that is amazing.” – Ulalia Woodside, Executive Director, Nature Conservancy of Hawai‘i

 

Nani and Ed’s son Manaola Yap, appearing in a Long Story Short encore (Tues., Jan. 15, 7:30 pm) is a young fashion designer and business owner with national and international credentials. “My background in design, and everything I do, comes from hula,” he says.

 

A dancer performing HulaAs a child, he helped his mother stage hula dramas for hotel visitors, creating costumes that helped tell the stories. For a dance honoring Pele, the fire goddess, he says Nani burned all of the edges of the dancers’ fabric “to a crisp.”

 

Successful father-and-son designers and hula practitioners Sig and Kuha‘o Zane of Hilo, Hawai‘i Island, also credit hula with inspiring and sustaining their aloha shirt business. For Sig, it started decades ago with wanting to make a special gift to court his future wife, seventh-generation kumu hula Nālani Kanaka‘ole. Sig learned silk screening and created plant designs, because in hula, many plant forms are important. Like Manaola, he had no formal design or business training.

 

Ulalia Woodside, Executive Director of the Nature Conservancy of Hawai‘i, oversees 40,000 acres of preservation lands. She grew up in Waimānalo, Windward O‘ahu, learning the discipline and interconnectedness of the hula tradition. She says it forged her view of how to live life and how to carry out her work.

 

“(Hula) is about the collective,” she says, “it is about recognizing that together, we produce something that is amazing.”

 

Season’s Aloha

Leslie signature


 

 

 

AMERICAN MASTERS
Harper Lee

 

Uncover the mysterious life of the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of To Kill a
Mockingbird
. AMERICAN MASTERS offers an unprecedented look at the life of
Harper Lee, illuminating the phenomenon behind To Kill a Mockingbird and
the Oscar-winning 1962 film adaptation. The documentary reveals the context and
history of the novel’s Deep South setting, and the social changes it inspired
after publication. Tom Brokaw, Rosanne Cash, Anna Quindlen, Scott Turow, Oprah
Winfrey and others reflect on the novel’s power, influence, popularity, and the
ways it has shaped their lives. This updated program also previews Go Set a
Watchman
, Lee’s novel set to be published for the first time on July 14th.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #902 – I Am Able

 

TOP STORY

Students from Maui High School in Kahului present an inspiring story about Keizhawn Daquis, a Maui Waena Intermediate School student who was born with spina bifida, a birth defect in which a developing baby’s spinal cord fails to develop properly. As a result Keizhawn needs a wheelchair to get around. Despite his disability, Keizhawn is active in a number of sports, including tennis, surfing, wheelchair racing and swimming.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

–Students from Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i show us how a love of dance has shaped the life and career of a Kaua‘i-based ballet teacher.

 

–Students from Hawai‘i Preparatory Academy on Hawai‘i Island tell the story of an historic campus building that was physically moved into Waimea town and turned into an art gallery.

 

–Students from ‘Ilima Intermediate School in ‘Ewa, O‘ahu, show us how to make the local sweet treat halo halo.

 

–Students from Kalani High School in East Honolulu tell the story of a young man who uses rap as a means of personal expression.

 

–Students from Kua o ka Lā Miloliʻi Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy on Hawai‘i Island introduce us to a woman who is dedicated to the preservation of precious Hawai‘i ecosystems.

 

–Students from Mid-Pacific in the Mānoa district of O‘ahu reveal how their baseball team uses an ancient Japanese tradition as a source of inspiration.

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
When God Sleeps

 

Explore the journey of Iranian musician Shahin Najafi, forced into hiding after hardline clerics issue a fatwa (Islamic ruling) for his death, incensed by a rap song that focuses on the oppression of women, sexism and human rights abuses.

 

 

CRAFT IN AMERICA
Nature

 

This edition celebrates the beauty, inspiration and future of the American landscape. Working with wood, glass and fiber as well as new materials, the artists profiled challenge viewers to reassess their relationship to the natural world. Throughout history, the colors, textures, shapes, as well as scents and tastes of the physical world have inspired artists to produce works of astonishing dimension and power. Featured artists include Patrick Dougherty, Mary Merkel-Hess, Michelle Holzapfel, Catherine Alice Michaelis and Preston Singletary.

 

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