First Nations

JOSEPH ROSENDO’S TRAVELSCOPE
Cruising Canada: Ottawa and the Rideau Canal

 

The Rideau Canal is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, a popular tourist and recreational attraction and the oldest continuously operating canal system in North America. At every bend along the scenic engineering miracle the traveler is gifted with a world of surprises in its adjacent cities, towns and villages. Joseph begins his Rideau Canal journey in Ottawa where he explores the capital’s diverse neighborhoods, historic landmarks, farmer’s markets and hip restaurants. From the Ottawa Locks he climbs aboard his personal craft and pilots the luxury vessel along the canal’s watery trail on placid waters through thick forests to picturesque communities. He grinds flour in an ancient mill, samples “butter tarts” with the Gingerbread Man, blows glass “witch balls” and helps First Nations craftspeople build a birch bark canoe. From visiting a cannabis factory to dining on maple syrup soaked flapjacks and cranking open the 19th century locks by hand, Joseph’s Rideau Canal adventure pleases the senses and touches the heart.

 

 

 

SAMANTHA BROWN’S PLACES TO LOVE
Vancouver, Canada

 

A cosmopolitan city located on the edge of the wilderness, Vancouver offers both natural and urban beauty. On my trip, I trekked through scenic Stanley Park, hopped aboard a floatplane for stunning tour of the city, followed by landing on a mountain lake. Back in the city, just minutes away, I also discovered the unique shops of Granville Market, tasted local salmon at a First Nations restaurant, and so much more. Here’s why Vancouver is a place to love.

 

 

STANDING ON SACRED GROUND
Profit & Loss

 

In this four-part documentary series, native people share ecological wisdom and spiritual reverence while battling a utilitarian view of land in the form of consumer culture and resource extraction as well as competing religions and climate change.

 

Profit & Loss
In Papua New Guinea, a Chinese government-owned nickel mine has relocated villagers to a taboo sacred mountain, built a new pipeline and refinery on contested clan land, and dumped mining waste into the sea. In Alberta, First Nations people suffer from rare cancers as their traditional hunting grounds are strip-mined to unearth the world’s third-largest oil reserve. Indigenous people tell their own stories – and confront us with the ethical consequences of our culture of consumption.