future

ROADTRIP NATION
Setting Course in Hawai‘i: You Can Guide Your Future

ROAD TRIP NATION - Setting Course in Hawai‘i: You Can Guide Your Future

 

The team interviews Governor David Y. Ige; environmental policy specialist Hoku Ka‘aekuahiwi Pousima inspires Tehani to pursue her interest in law; and biologist Chrystie Naeole advises Keakealani and Traven on how they can maintain their unique identities while pursuing their ideas of success.

 

 

ROADTRIP NATION
Setting Course in Hawai‘i: Know Where Home Is

ROAD TRIP NATION - Setting Course in Hawai‘i: Know Where Home Is

 

Roadtrippers Tehani, Traven and Keakealani begin their journey on Hawai‘i Island, where they meet the scientist who saved Hawai‘i’s papayas.

 

ROADTRIP NATION
Setting Course in Hawai‘i: Cross the Ocean, Build Bridges

ROADTRIP NATION: Cross the Ocean, Build Bridges

 

Tehani, Traven and Keakealani visit the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory to explore an active volcano zone and meet with geophysicist Dr. Jim Kauahikaua and engineer Kevan Kamibayashi. Then they island-hop over to Maui, where they tour the NOAA Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary.

 

 

Roadtrip Nation: Setting Course in Hawai‘i

ROADTRIP NATION: Setting Course in Hawai‘i

 

Watch the Full Episodes Online:

EPISODE 1: Setting Course in Hawai‘i – Don’t Forget Where You Came From

EPISODE 2: Setting Course in Hawai‘i – Cross The Ocean, Build Bridges

EPISODE 3: Setting Course in Hawai‘i – Know Where Home Is

EPISODE 4: Setting Course in Hawai‘i – You Can Guide Your Future

 

Roadtrip Nation is a national public television series that features young adults on a road trip, as they explore different career paths by talking with a range of professionals who do what they love.

 

For the first time, Roadtrip Nation visits Hawai‘i for Setting Course in Hawai‘i, a four-part series that follows local college students Keakealani Pacheco, Tehani Louis-Perkins and Traven ‘Āpiki as they speak with community members from all walks of life.

 

ROADTRIP NATION: Setting Course in Hawai‘i

 

With their enthusiasm for science, technology, engineering, the arts and math (STEAM), coupled with their deep love of Hawai‘i and its native culture, Keakealani, Tehani and Traven embark across the Big Island, Maui and O‘ahu, with the hope of getting closer to uncovering what it takes to create a life that you love.

 

Read more about the series, and an interview with Keakealani, Tehani and Traven, in PBS Hawai‘i’s January 2018 Program Guide (PDF).

 

ROADTRIP NATION: Donʻt Forget Where You Came FromDon’t Forget Where You Came From

Wednesday, January 3, 7:30 pm

Roadtrippers Tehani, Traven and Keakealani begin their journey on Hawai‘i Island, where they meet Dr. Misaki Takabayashi, the Interim Associate Dean at UH Hilo; and Dr. Dennis Gonsalves, whose research helped develop the virus-resistant Rainbow papaya.
Encores Sunday, January 7, 4:30 pm

 

ROADTRIP NATION: Cross the Ocean, Build BridgesCross the Ocean, Build Bridges

Wednesday, January 10, 7:30 pm

Tehani, Traven and Keakealani visit the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory to explore an active volcano zone and meet with geophysicist Dr. Jim Kauahikaua and engineer Kevan Kamibayashi. Then they island-hop over to Maui, where they tour the NOAA Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary.
Encores Sunday, January 14, 4:30 pm

ROADTRIP NATION: Know Where Home IsKnow Where Home Is

Wednesday, January 17, 7:30 pm

The roadtrippers reach Oʻahu and take a once-in-a-lifetime trip up Mount Ka‘ala and visit the U.S. Army’s Natural Resource Management Unit at the summit of Ka’ala. Then they head to the North Shore to check out the Pipe Masters surfing contest and interview Surfline’s lead forecaster Kevin Wallis.
Encores Sunday, January 21, 4:30 pm

ROADTRIP NATION: You Can Guide Your FutureYou Can Guide Your Future

Wednesday, January 24, 7:30 pm

The team interviews Governor David Y. Ige; environmental policy specialist Hoku Ka‘aekuahiwi Pousima inspires Tehani to pursue her interest in law; and biologist Chrystie Naeole advises Keakealani and Traven on how they can maintain their unique identities while pursuing their ideas of success.
Encores Sunday, January 28, 4:30 pm

ROADTRIP NATION
Setting Course in Hawai‘i: Don’t Forget Where You Came From

 

Take an excursion through the Hawaiian Islands with Traven, Tehani, and Keakealani, three college students from Hawaii who share a common goal: to harness their enthusiasm for the fields of science, technology, engineering, the arts, and math (STEAM), and direct it towards positively shaping their state’s future. As they explore the global impact being made in their own backyards, they gradually realize that as long as they remain steered by their interests and driven by their love for Hawai‘i, they will never be led astray—no matter which career path they choose to take.

 

What Drives KEN BURNS?

 

CEO Message

What Drives Ken Burns?

 

Ken Burns, Photo courtesy of Justin Altman

 

Filmmaker Ken Burns, who’s coming out with an 18-hour Vietnam War film to be shown over 10 evenings this month on PBS Hawai‘i, freely admits that he’s a workaholic; that he’s obsessive in his pursuit of archival material for his films; that his detractors dismiss him as long-winded.

 

And Burns can laugh at himself.

 

As he did when he was being honored as the greatest American documentary filmmaker of his generation. Stepping up to receive a lifetime achievement, he joked that he’d prepared a nine-part response.

 

He had to learn about laughter, since sadness and loss were prevailing childhood themes.

 

Burns, 64, is clear about what drives him and his compulsion to look at the past. It is the death of his mother, Lyla Burns, just before he turned 12. She had suffered from breast cancer for nearly a decade.

 

Burns remembers coming home from school or play every day and telling his ailing mother stories about what had happened, in effect sharing life with her. After she passed away, he recalls watching movies with father, Robert Burns, and seeing him cry, which was something his father didn’t do in other circumstances. That’s when young Burns says he grasped the storytelling power of film.

 

In a short video posted online at creativeplanetnetwork.com, Burns says: “I found myself becoming a documentary filmmaker, trying to tell stories and using American history to tell those stories that I wanted to tell. When you look back at it, the job that I try to do is to wake the dead. And it doesn’t seem too far a leap to understand, from that early decision to be a filmmaker, who I really want to wake up.”

 

From the earliest time that he can remember as a child, he says he knew his beloved mom was sick. He was not close to his father.

 

As a young man, he rejected chasing a Hollywood-type career. He says he innately knew, and was taught at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts, that “there’s much more drama in what is and what was, than in anything the human imagination can dream of.”

 

Delivering the commencement address at Stanford University last year, Burns explained that delving into history can lead to personal and professional breakthroughs.

 

“The past often offers an illuminating and clear-headed perspective from which to observe and reconcile the passions of the present moment, just when they threaten to overwhelm us,” he told new graduates.

 

Burns wants this newest film with his creative partner Lynn Novick, about the divisive Vietnam War era, to spur national healing.

 

As he told an interviewer from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee:

 

“We caught something during the Vietnam War – like a virus – and we are still suffering from the effects of that virus today. I’m hoping my film is a bit like a vaccination – that it exposes you to a little bit of the disease to permit you to go past it and heal from it.”

 

I invite you to join me in viewing this new Burns/Novick film series, starting at 8:00 pm, Sunday, September 17, on your TV station, PBS Hawai‘i.

 

A hui hou (until next time),
Leslie Wilcoxʻ signature

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Can We Double Local Food Production by 2020?

 

Hawai‘i continues to be heavily reliant on imports to feed its 1.4 million residents and 8 million visitors. About $3 billion a year is spent to ship in approximately 90 percent of our food, with 6 million pounds of food arriving daily by cargo ships and planes. If these ships and planes stopped arriving, Hawai‘i’s food supply would last only 3-10 days. This is why Governor David Ige has set a goal that we double local food production by 2020. What will it take to reach this goal – and can it be done?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and online via Facebook and Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

FRONTLINE
Second Chance Kids

 

FRONTLINE details the fight over the fate of juveniles in prison for murder, following a landmark Supreme Court ruling. The episode examines the impact of the order to reevaluate thousands of juvenile murder cases and follows two of the first convicts to be released.

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
The Bad Kids

 

Located in an impoverished Mojave Desert community, Black Rock Continuation High School is an alternative school for students at risk of dropping out; Black Rock is their last chance. Extraordinary educators believe that empathy and life skills, more than academics, give these underserved students command of their own futures.

 

FRONTLINE
Iraq Uncovered

 

FRONTLINE reports on what is happening on the ground in Iraq in areas where ISIS has been pushed out. Correspondent Ramita Navai makes a dangerous and revealing journey inside the war-torn country, investigating allegations of abuse of Sunni Muslim civilians by powerful Shia militias.

 

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