games

A Slimmed-Down Program Guide

 

CEO Message

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO

You may notice that this monthly program guide is skinnier than it was last month, as if it went on a crash diet. There was indeed a crash of sorts, one that all of us are dealing with in one way or another: the economic fall-out from COVID-19.

 

PBS Hawai‘i is part of the local community. When our supporters suffer financial loss, we feel it, too. Many people are limiting their charitable giving. Our heart goes out to those who’ve been hard hit by effects of the pandemic.

 

As part of stewarding our resources, we’ve slimmed down this monthly program guide. But please note that we’re devoting the same number of pages as before to program highlights. Also, we’ll keep delivering our free weekly e-newsletter with more detailed programming information. Sign up for it at https://www.pbshawaii.org/newsletter-signup/

 

And most importantly, we continue to bring you the same quality programming.

 

An excerpt from an Oʻahu viewer's noteMany viewers are appreciating this as they shelter at home, watching more PBS Hawai‘i offerings than usual. We’ve especially heard from viewers of our weekly live forums on Insights on PBS Hawai‘i: COVID-19 in Hawai‘i, and HIKI NŌ featuring Student Reflections from home; from Passport viewers, accessing both new and archival PBS shows; and from parents introducing their young children to our online PBS KIDS 24/7 channel, which is aligned with fun, educational video games.

 

Pictured right: An excerpt from an Oʻahu viewer’s note

 

Folks have been phoning or writing with kind sentiments including: “You’re a lifesaver for helping me educate my child at home.” “You bring us delight, beauty, wonder and information every day…” “I’m going through a hard time, but I feel better with the inspiration I get from your programs.”

 

Aloha is real and palpable and feeds heart and soul. From our PBS Hawai‘i Board of Directors and Staff, here’s wishing you aloha nui as you press through this challenging time and grow even stronger in adversity.

 

Hawai‘i is hurting, but we still encourage, uplift and help each other. We are not defined or diminished by our circumstances.

 

Masking my face but not my aloha!

Leslie signature

 

 

 

Learning

PBS Hawaiʻi Learning Resources

PBS HAWAIʻI
Learning Resources

 

 

PBS Hawai’i is pleased to offer FREE comprehensive and curriculum-based educational resources for children pre-k through high school, educators and parents.

 

     PBS KIDS Games App     |     PBS KIDS 24/7     |     PBS LearningMedia     

 

Pick and choose which resources are most appropriate for you and your family and/or your students based on age and grade.

 


PBS KIDS Games App

 

The PBS KIDS Games app provides a safe, child-friendly viewing experience for keiki and parents with access to thousands of free games, including full episodes and clips from top PBS KIDS series. Keiki can watch their favorite PBS KIDS shows anytime, anywhere at their own convenience.

 

 

Get the App

 

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PBS KIDS 24/7

 

PBS KIDS 24/7 is a new stand-alone TV channel featuring fun, curriculum-based cartoons for children ages 2-8. It is also available online with interactive, educational video games.

 

 

Watch PBS KIDS 24/7

 

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PBS LearningMedia

 

A rich, easy-to-use online library for parents and educators of students pre-K through high school. The site offers interactive video lesson plans, student activities and other educational resources.

 

PBS Learning Media

 

View Learning Materials

 

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POV
My Way to Olympia

 

Who better to cover the Paralympics, the international sporting event for athletes with physical and intellectual disabilities, than Niko von Glasow, the world’s best-known disabled filmmaker.‌ Unfortunately – or fortunately for anyone seeking an insightful and funny documentary – this filmmaker frankly hates sports and thinks the games are “a stupid idea.” Born with severely shortened arms, von Glasow serves as an endearing guide to London’s Paralympics competition. As he meets a one-handed Norwegian table tennis player, the Rwandan sitting volleyball team, an American archer without arms and a Greek paraplegic boccia player, his own stereotypes about disability and sports are delightfully punctured.

 

TIME SCANNERS
Colosseum

 

With cutting-edge technology that can “read” buildings, ruins and landscapes from ancient worlds, TIME SCANNERS reveals physical and forensic history, allowing viewers to virtually reach out and touch the past.

 

Colosseum
The team uses laser-scanning technology to uncover the engineering secrets behind ancient Rome’s Colosseum. Structural engineer Steve Burrows leads his team of laser-scanning experts to Rome on a quest to uncover some of the engineering world’s oldest mysteries of the Colosseum. Using cutting-edge 3D laser-scanning technology, the team wants to answer three questions. How did the Romans produce some of the most impressive gladiatorial games ever seen in Europe? How did the Colosseum’s mysterious roof really work? Finally, how does the mighty Colosseum compare, in state of the art computer testing, to the sports stadiums of the 21st century?

 

The Greeks
Chasing Greatness

 

Explore Greek history with archaeologists, historians, scientists and artists who are launching groundbreaking new explorations of what made the achievements of the ancient Greeks great.

 

Chasing Greatness
Watch as ancient Greece’s legacy is invoked in Athens and at the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court. Take a look back at its rise and fall, which might not only help us understand the challenges we face now, but may also point toward a better future.

 

The Greeks
The Good Strife

 

Explore Greek history with archaeologists, historians, scientists and artists who are launching groundbreaking new explorations of what made the achievements of the ancient Greeks great.

 

The Good Strife
In the wake of the Bronze Age collapse, Greek civilization entered a crippling dark age. But with centralized monarchies out of the way, a new type of society was given the chance to rise from the ashes — built not by kings from the top down, but by individuals from the bottom up. Through centuries of strife, or perhaps because of them, this disparate group of people, bound by a common language, epic stories of heroic ancestors, a shared belief in the gods and an insatiably competitive spirit, delivered some of humanity’s greatest achievements – from the first Olympic Games to early theories of nature to an entirely new system of government: democracy.

 

Olympic Quest: Teshya and Clarissa

Olympic Quest: Teshya Alo and Clarissa Chun

 

This special presentation celebrates two Olympic hopefuls from Hawaii: Teshya Alo and Clarissa Chun. They are competing in the U.S. Olympic Wrestling Trials on April 9-10 in Iowa City.

 

The film Winning Girl follows the four-year journey of Hawaii teenager Teshya Alo, whose sights are set on taking the gold at international judo and wrestling championships. Throughout, she also faces the challenges of growing up.

 

Then, Clarissa Chun talks to Leslie Wilcox about her experiences in what she calls a “fun but gruesome” sport. Long before winning an Olympic bronze medal in wrestling, Clarissa started competing in judo at age 7. By the time she took up wrestling at Roosevelt High School, Clarissa was unfazed about grappling with both boys and girls.