gap

HIKI NŌ
Compilation Show from the Spring Quarter of the 2018-2019 School Year

 

This compilation show features some of the top stories from the Spring Quarter of the 2018-2019 school year. Besides being excellent stories, these pieces all explore the connections between people and, in some cases, between people and other living things.

 

Students from McKinley High School in Honolulu tell the story of teenagers who connect with senior citizens in ways that bridge the generation gap.

 

Students from Waiʻanae High School in Central Oʻahu tell the story of a young tattoo artist who uses his art form to connect with his Hawaiian heritage.

 

Students from Konawaena High School on Hawaiʻi Island feature a 96-year-old Holocaust survivor who connects with Big Island students by teaching them about the devastating effects of bigotry and racism.

 

Students from Hilo Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island focus on the special connection between a bone marrow donor and the recipient of that donation who discover (despite the astronomical odds against it happening) that they live just minutes away from one another.

 

Students from Kua O Ka Lā Miloliʻi Hipuʻu Virtual Academy on Hawaiʻi Island follow conservationists who are facilitating the connection between male and female members of an endangered Hawaiian crow in order to save the species from extinction.

 

Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauaʻi introduce us to a singing nun who uses music to help students connect with the values she tries to instill in them.

 

Students from Maui High School in Kahului show us how a disabled student makes profound connections with her non-disabled peers through a program developed by the Special Olympics.

 

Students from Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a pet placement service that connects homeless canines with their forever owners.

 

This special episode is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ graduate from Waiʻanae High School on Oʻahu who has just completed her junior year at Menlo College in Northern California, where she majors in marketing and human resources.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Should We Change The Minimum Wage to a Living Wage?

 

Despite taking Hawai‘i’s minimum wage up to $9.25 an hour – and a scheduled increase to $10.10 effective next year – Hawai‘i’s minimum wage workers are faced with an impossible challenge: the biggest gap nationally between a state’s minimum hourly wage and the most basic earnings required to meet the local cost of living. Should we change the minimum wage to a living wage?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

HIKI NŌ
Top Story: Ka Waihona o ka Naauao Public Charter School, Joseph Kekuku

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Ka Waihona o ka Naauao Public Charter School in Nanakuli on Oahu tell the story of Joseph Kekuku, the Native Hawaiian musician from Laie who discovered the Hawaiian Steel Guitar over 100 years ago. Legend has it that Kekuku accidentally dropped his comb on the strings of his guitar one day and liked what he heard. He then developed the sound and technique that became known as Hawaiian steel guitar. When he took that sound abroad it caught on and was one of the reasons why Hawaiian music enjoyed world-wide popularity in the 1920s and 30s. The story includes interviews with Kekuku’s grandson Uncle Joe Ah Quin and grandnieces Aunty Kaiwa Meyer and Aunty Gladys Pualoa-Ahuna.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Kauai High School on the Garden Isle tell the story of a science-trained farmer who turned his love of the science of food into a thriving, family-run food truck.

 

Students from Kapaa Middle School on Kauai show us how to turn old, discarded crayons into colorful abstract art.

 

For a very different approach to art, we tap the HIKI NŌ archives to revisit a story from Iolani School on Oahu about a young conceptual artist/photographer.

 

Students from Kainalu Elementary School in Windward Oahu show us the therapeutic value of miniature horses for special needs children.

 

Students from Saint Francis School on Oahu introduce us to a teacher who is dedicated to bridging the communication gap between the deaf and hearing communities through American Sign Language.

 

This program encores Saturday, June 4 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, June 5 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.