graduation

HIKI NŌ
HIKI NŌ Class of 2019 & 2020

 

This is the final episode in a series of four specials in which outstanding HIKI NŌ graduates from the Class of 2019 (and one student from the Class of 2020) gathered at PBS Hawaiʻi to discuss their HIKI NŌ experiences and how they feel the skills they learned from HIKI NŌ will help them in college, the workplace and life.

 

This episode features Christine Alonzo, who is now a HIKI NŌ student in her senior year at Maui High School; Julia Forrest, who graduated from Waiʻanae High School on Oʻahu and is now a Public Policy major at the University of Michigan; and Tiffany Sagucio, who graduated from Kauaʻi High School and is now majoring in Communications at UH Mānoa.

 

Each student also shows a HIKI NŌ story that they worked on and discusses what they learned from the experience of working on that particular story. Christine shares her story, “Kuleana,” about the making of the independent feature film Kuleana by a Maui resident and a tight-knit local film community. Julia shows her story “Naked Cow Dairy,” about the last dairy farm on Oʻahu. Tiffany presents her story, “A Special Piece,” — a personal video essay about appreciating home on the threshold of going away to college.

 

 

 

POV
Raising Bertie

 

View an intimate portrait of three African American boys coming of age in rural North Carolina. The young men navigate unemployment, institutional racism, violence, first love, fatherhood and estrangement from family members and mentors.

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
The Homestretch

 

This film follows three homeless teens as they fight to stay in school, graduate, and build a future. Each of these smart, ambitious youths – Roque, Kasey, and Anthony – will surprise, inspire, and challenge audiences to rethink stereotypes of homelessness as they work to complete their education while facing the trauma of being alone and abandoned at an early age. While told through a personal perspective, their stories connect with larger issues of poverty, race, juvenile justice, immigration, foster care, and LGBTQ rights.

With unprecedented access into Chicago public schools, The Night Ministry “Crib” emergency youth shelter, and Teen Living Programs’ Belfort House, the documentary follows these kids as they move through the milestones of high school while navigating a landscape of couch hopping, emergency shelters, transitional homes, street families and a school system on the front lines of the homelessness crisis. It examines the struggles these youth face in obtaining a high school level education, and then follows them beyond graduation to focus on the crucial transition when the structure of school vanishes, and homeless youth often struggle to find the support and community they need to survive and be independent. The film is a powerful, original perspective on what it means to be young and homeless in America today, while building a future.