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LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX
Allen Hoe

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX: Allen Hoe

 

As one of more than two million draftees called upon to fight in the Vietnam War, 19-year-old Allen Hoe thought he would serve his time and then his life would return to normal. He couldn’t have imagined that his 10-month combat tour would make him what others describe as a soldier’s soldier. The longtime Hawai‘i attorney reflects on the wartime experiences that forever shaped his civilian life.

 

Read the November program guide cover story on Allen Hoe

 

Program

 

This program will be rebroadcast on Sunday, June 2, at 4:00 pm and 11:30 pm.

 

More from Allen Hoe:

 

The Flag

 

Why Polo?

 

Allen Hoe Audio

 

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Transcript

 

When U.S. Army General Robert Brown spoke of the 2018 recipient of the Mana O Ke Koa, Spirit of Warrior Award, he said: Awardees demonstrate unparalleled patronage for and civilian leadership toward our Army.  Allen Hoe embodies those qualities.  While each nominee for the award is deserving, we feel Allen’s dedication to the Army is truly outstanding.

 

Fifty years prior to General Brown’s statement, the Army sent a special invitation—a draft notice, to the same Allen Hoe, who admits he was a typical local boy of the late 60s, focused only on surfing, hotrods, and girls.  But a ten-month combat tour in a small country in Southeast Asia turned this local boy into a soldier’s soldier.  Vietnam veteran Allen Hoe, next, on Long Story Short.

 

One-on-one engaging conversations with some of Hawai‘i’s most intriguing people: Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox.

 

Aloha mai kākou. I’m Leslie Wilcox.  Allen Hoe’s father was from Kalihi on O‘ahu, and his mother was raised in Moloa‘a on Kaua‘i.  He points out his ancestors were all subjects of monarchies—on his father’s side, Chinese and Japanese; his mother, Hawaiian, English, Scottish, German, and Spanish. His father was a World War II veteran, and there’s evidence of warriors serving their country throughout Hoe’s family tree from the Queen’s royal guard in India, to a war lieutenant for King Kamehameha.

 

Now, you were raised a regular local kid?

 

Typical local boy; right.  You know, in the 60s, focused on surfing, rock ‘n roll, and girls.  The 60s, I think, for me, our history in the 60s was probably the most traumatic decade that our country has experienced in the last century.

 

And were you part of that resist, oppose? You know, resist authority was the call of the day for young people.

 

Yeah. Me?  No; I was more interested in hotrods and surfing.

 

So, that kind of passed you by.

 

Yeah, yeah; that kinda passed us by.

 

Were you in ROTC as a student?

 

So, did the war in Vietnam touch your life as it started out in the 60s?

 

You know, not really.  I think in my junior, senior year, it was just really kinda like an extra subject for history lessons, history courses.  And it wasn’t until the summer after we graduated that it kinda came home very personally, because the older brother of one my dearest friends was one of the first casualties in Vietnam.  He was killed in Cu Chi.

 

Oh …

 

And then, later on that year, I had a cousin who was killed in Vietnam as well. And then, it’s like, wow, this is for real, what’s happening here.

 

What happened next?

 

And then, I was still pretty much living life like a local boy.

 

Hotrods.

 

Hotrods—

 

Girls and surfing.

 

Yeah, yeah, surfing.  And then, I got a special call.  I love to tell this story, because the young soldiers today, I said: You know what, we are so proud of the decisions you made to serve your country, but you know, my legacy is a little bit different.  I was very special; Uncle Sam came looking for me.

 

He said: Mr. Hoe, we need you.

 

Had you been dreading a draft call?

 

No; no. You know, in my generation, that was part of growing up.  At some point, you know, you would either volunteer to become part of the then, what was very fascinating all-Hawai‘i company, which on 4thof July every year, you know, a hundred or so young high school grads would become part of the all-Hawai‘i company.  So, for me, you know, service was just gonna be part of my growing up.

 

So, that service didn’t, in your mind, include combat.

 

No. But it included, you know, doing some time in the military.

 

Right.  And so, even when you got that call, you didn’t say: Oh, my god, I could get sent to Vietnam, I could get put in really difficult circumstances.

 

Yeah; reality … I was nineteen, and that was not, I think, part of my reality. You know, I was young, still making perhaps unwise decisions regarding activities in life, et cetera.  So, for me, yeah, I didn’t feel threatened by it, neither did I feel any kind of overwhelming sense of obligation, other than to serve your country.

 

I understand after being drafted, you could have stayed here, I think.  But you volunteered to go to Vietnam?

 

Yes. Having grown up and hearing the stories from my aunts and uncles, and cousins, regarding our, quote, warrior culture, after training to become a combat medic—

 

Why did you train to be a combat medic?

 

Well, Uncle Sam said that’s—

 

You were designated.

 

Designated.

 

Okay.

 

Yeah; for training.  And you know, they give you a battery of tests, et cetera, and you know, who knows, but you know, fortunately, and I feel I was very blessed to have been selected to become a combat medic.  And after I trained long and hard to do that, when we graduated, all of the new combat medic qualified soldiers would go to the bulletin board to see where their next duty station was.  And the bulk of my class went straight to Vietnam.  I was assigned to San Francisco.  And you know, I didn’t question it.  And then, when I got to San Francisco, I was assigned to Travis Air Force Base.  The unit I was assigned to had a lot of soldiers who had come back from Vietnam, and they maybe had three to six months left on their assignment before they got out of the Army.  And stories that they shared with me in terms of what it was like presented a challenge to me, and I said: You know, given my background and my family history, I don’t ever want to … look back and say, I wonder how I would have done in combat.

 

But it was a different kind of combat.  I mean, it was like no other war we’ve had.

 

Yeah, but you know, for a nineteen-year-old, there’s only one kind of combat.

 

Wasn’t there some Geneva Convention ruling that it’s a war crime to shoot a combat medic who’s clearly identified in combat. But in Vietnam …

 

There were no rules.

 

Forget it.

 

Forget it; right.  And life expectancies for combat medics were worse than first lieutenants.

 

So, you wore weapons.

 

I carried, I carried both sidearm and a rifle.  And you wore nothing that indicated that you were a medic, other than your bag was bigger than the rest.

 

And then, you went out right after people got hurt in combat.

 

My mission, I was with a long-range reconnaissance team.  And so, when someone got wounded, they were generally standing right next to you, so you knew what was going on.  Yeah.

 

So, you could have been hit too.

 

Yeah.

 

Did you fire your weapon?

 

Yes. You know, for me, part of that experience, being twenty by the time I got there, and being young and adventurous, part of my responsibility being on that team was, I had to learn all the duties or all the functions of everyone else.  And as the medic, I trained the members of my team to the best of my ability in terms of, you know, first responder life-saving methods.  So, while with the team, not only did I fire my weapons, but you know, I helped set ambushes, I learned how to call artillery, and learned how to set demolitions and blow charges.  And yeah, you gotta understand, for a twenty-year-old, this is like fun stuff.

 

You don’t feel that it’ll actually hurt you? Do you feel untouchable?

 

You feel immortal.

 

Immortal.

 

Yeah.

 

Yeah.

 

The most foolish kinds of things that one accepts in combat is that if it happens, it happens.  You know. And then, for me, it was, you know, as long as I can get through three of these life-threatening experiences, then I’ll be okay.  I very clearly distinctly remember the three times that I was supposed to have received something fatal, and survived.  And after the third time, it was like, oh, big relief.  I said: Nothing’s gonna happen.

 

I’ve got a force field around me.

 

I’ve got a force field around me.  And then, you just kinda learn how to operate just naturally and freely.  And yeah, you were still concerned, you were still frightened on occasion, but you knew that at the end of the day, nothing’s gonna happen. And you know … nothing happened.

 

But you can’t do that by skill alone; right?

 

It’s luck.

 

It is a matter of chance.

 

No, no, no.  Yeah; you survive combat purely on luck.

 

And meanwhile, you were seeing some scenes you can’t un-see.

 

Yeah.

 

Mutilated limbs and gory stuff.

 

Yeah.

 

Very sad, just grievous injuries.  How did you deal with that?

 

For me, it was just reactionary.  I trained; everyone trained.

 

You compartmentalized?

 

You compartmentalize.  When stuff happened, instinct kicks in.  And you know, I think one of the saving graces of our current force is that our young shooters, as I call them, the young infantry soldiers or the young combat soldiers that have to go to war for us, they are required to train twenty-four/seven.  And it becomes instinctive, it becomes reactionary.  So, when they’re on a patrol, they experience enemy action, they immediately shift into their combat mode.

 

Did you hear the talk that we understand was common at the time, where people were saying: What are we here for, why are here, this war doesn’t make sense.

 

Yeah. We would hear about that or read about that in letters or the newspapers that would occasionally come to us.  But you know, the reality is, at the end of the day in combat, you’re not thinking about fighting for your country, you’re not thinking about fighting to preserve, you know, family values or the constitution, et cetera.  You are simply thinking about saving the life of your buddy on your right and on your left. And you know, the reality is, at the end of the day, if you’ve done your job right and everybody survives, our country will be blessed by that.

 

Did you get really close to the guys you served with?

 

Oh; you know, to this day.  Fifty years ago, I met incredible bunch of young men, and probably spent twenty-four/seven with these men, maybe not more than four or five months with them, but to this day, when I hear their voice, I immediately know who I’m talking to. It’s that special bond that even kind of um, surpasses a familial bond.  You know, I have a relationship and memories of guys that I served with perhaps that run deeper than with my own two siblings.

 

Wow.  And you know, when you’re with somebody who’s terribly hurt, and possibly or inevitably dying, it’s a really intimate time you share.  How was that?

 

Yeah. For me, and the guys most closest to me, if one of our buddies was hit, we were—this is fascinating–we were doing our best to stabilize his condition, but it becomes not quiet and soft, but it becomes a loud, raucous kind of conversation to get their attention, to get them to focus, to get them to hang on and not to give up.  You know, so it’s yelling and screaming.  This is like—you know, I remember the first time that happened, my platoon sergeant, who obviously had been there longer than me, as I was treating one of my wounded buddies, he was shaking him to get him to respond, to wake up, and to fight on before we put him on the helicopter.  And I learned something that day, in terms of first, you know, you’re gonna … do your job to stop the bleeding, prevent the shock, but at the end of the day, you’ve got to get that young soldier’s attention, to get him to focus on things he needs to do.

 

Because that helps him—

 

Him, yeah.

 

–help himself.

 

Help himself.

 

You know, you have seen some things that most people never see, never have to know what it’s like.

 

Yeah.

 

How has that affected you?

 

You know … at times, it causes me to kinda go into a slump, but I’ve always been able to deal with that in terms of, that’s war.  And I kinda kick into this mode where long time ago, I read this passage where, you know, in war there’s only two rules; the first rule is that people die, and then the second rule is that you cannot change rule one.  So, you know, we were at war, people are gonna die, you know, and thank God if you survive, that you survive.

 

That 1968, when you were there, that was a particularly …

 

Yeah.

 

–fatal—

 

Yeah.

 

–grisly year.

 

Yeah.

 

I mean, lots of fatalities.

 

Yeah. I guess the high water mark was 1968; in May, 1968.  And yeah, May 1968 was a particularly bad month for me.

 

What happened?

 

I lost eighteen of my guys.  And but for the grace of God, I would not be here, because ten of ‘em are still missing in action.  The grace of God was that my unit was transitioning from Point A to Point B, and I was not with them that day.  I was back in the rear, getting ready to rejoin them.  Before I could rejoin them at the new location, they were overrun.

 

And some of them were never found, but were you treating your own men?

 

Yeah.

 

In the field.

 

Yeah.

 

May; was that Mother’s Day?

 

May, Mother’s Day.

 

Mother’s Day.

 

Mother’s Day, 1968.  Yeah. I mean … if you can imagine, I mean, you’re a mother, you know how important Mother’s Day is.  That day by itself, you know, to get the message or the knock on your door that your son was killed on Mother’s Day.  I mean …

 

And so now, when Mother’s Day comes around at your home, you think of another meaning for it.

 

Yeah. I am reflective on the mothers of my men who didn’t make it.  And you know, over the past fifty years … that bond I had with their sons, I’ve developed with them.  So, for me, it’s very special.  For me, it’s always been an obligation to assure their mothers whose sons never came home that their sons are superb young men.

 

You made an effort to go do that?

 

Absolutely.  The majority of the men who I lost on Mother’s Day 1968, their mothers and their fathers had absolutely no clue what happened to them.  And to live without any knowledge of what happened, I just couldn’t.  And that’s even worse, you know, to have your son taken from you in combat, and that’s all you know.  He’s not here.  Why? We can’t share that with you, we can’t tell you the circumstances, or what happened on that day.

 

Do you think you had PTSD after the war?

 

I had issues.  I don’t necessarily think it is or was PTSD.  Everybody who experiences combat has issues.  I remember when I first came back from Vietnam, the first month that I was home, it was just party time; right?  You know, I was riding motorcycles back then, and every night we’d go out and … go and enjoy life, tip a few Primos.  And I remember like after a month, one day, my dad came home.  We were passing, I think in the driveway; I was getting ready to go out, and he was coming home from work.  And said: Al.  He said: You have a moment?  I go: Yeah, absolutely.  He told me, he said: You know, son, I won’t even begin to understand what you experienced in Vietnam, and what you’re doing now, you know, I’m not supportive of your behavior and what your conduct is now.  So, you know, how much longer are you going to do this, ‘cause don’t you think you need to start thinking about your future?  I hope you’re not planning to do this the rest of your life.  And I said: No, Dad, I’m just having fun.  But you know, that kinda came home to roost really strong for me, my father saying: Okay, all right, it’s time to kinda like get on with your life.  And, you know, I did.

 

He did it in such a nice way, too.

 

Yeah; he was just an incredible guy.

 

Allen Hoe’s parents had always insisted he would attend college, so when he returned home, he took advantage of two new State institutions for learning.  He enrolled in the new Leeward Community College, later graduating from UH Mānoa, and he was among the first class of law students admitted to the William S. Richardson School of Law.

 

Okay; the style of the day was long hair.

 

Yeah.

 

So, did you go back from the war with your short haircut, to—

 

Long hair.

 

–long hair.

 

Yeah.

 

And did you see anti-war protests?

 

Oh, yeah; yeah.  You know …

 

How did you feel about them?

 

You know, this may sound strange, but to me, that was just part of our great democracy.  You know, I tell people: Yeah, I have no problems with the protests, the marchers, and the anti-war people, even when I was in Vietnam.  I said: Hey, that’s what we’re here for, to give them the right to exercise, you know, their freedom.  And it truly did not bother me.  One of the things, though, that did bother me was, a couple of the young Leeward students were egged on by this group to pull down the American flag. And four of us Vietnam veterans stood ‘em off, and we said: You touch that flag, and you’re gonna go down.  And … they left the flag alone.  I said: You can protest the war all you want, but you’re not gonna come and touch this flag.

 

And that was a spontaneous act by the four of you?

 

Yeah.

 

Did you ever get pegged the wrong way when you walked around campus with the long hair?  I mean, did people assume anything about you that wasn’t true?

 

The wife of a soldier who was in one of my classes, her husband was a career soldier, had not been in combat.  And she made this kind of strange comment to me.  She said: Why are you so angry?  And I said: What do you mean?  She said: There’s this hate that comes from your eyes.  And I said: Your husband’s a soldier, has he been in combat?  No.  I said: Well, you send him to combat, and this is the look that he will come home with. And she just couldn’t understand that.

 

That it’s not anger.

 

It’s not anger.  People these days, or even for many years, they call it the Thousand-Yard Stare.

 

Allen Hoe’s adjustment to civilian life was bolstered when he met his future wife, Adele.

 

We met actually, I think maybe the second month after I got out of the Army. And you know, when I first saw her, I said: Oh, my god, that is the girl of my dreams.

 

At first look?

 

That first day we spent together.  She was actually a coworker of the sister of one of my dear friends.  So, we just kinda like wound up on not a blind date, but time together.  And she was, or is just a special person.  Yeah; yeah.  Swept me off my feet, so to speak.

 

Adele and Allen Hoe married and shared in the joy of raising two sons: Nainoa and Nakoa.  Both young men chose to be warriors and serve their country.  The elder son, Army First Lieutenant Nainoa Hoe, was killed by a sniper’s bullet while he led a foot patrol in Northern Iraq in 2005.  He was just twenty-seven years old, and had been married for less than a year.

 

My wife and I, Adele, we still hear from the soldiers who served with Nainoa. And that is very comforting to us. He absolutely loved being a soldier. And the fortunate part, if there is anything fortunate about that horrible tragedy, was that his last day on this earth was documented by a writer who wrote an incredible story of how my son spent his last day with his men in combat.  Now, for me, as a father who had experienced combat, that was just an absolutely incredible story.  For me, it was very gratifying to hear how he performed in combat, and how his men just dearly loved him.

 

Yeah; I was so impressed by your son Nakoa.

 

Ah …

 

Seeing him at an event where Nainoa was being spoken of and honored, and all the attention was on the fallen son.  And Nakoa is a very honorable and brave, Army leader in his own right.  Right?

 

Correct.

 

But it was not about him; he was just happy to see Nainoa being celebrated.  I thought, he’s grown up in that shadow of his—

 

Big brother.

 

–his big brother being venerated as a hero.

 

Yeah.

 

And not feeling like: What about me?

 

Yeah. You know, in retrospect, my Hawaiian culture, that’s what led me to name him Nakoa; brave, courageous, strong, army, a soldier.

 

It does take courage to kinda—

 

Yeah; to stand in the shadow.

 

To stand in the shadow; right.

 

Yeah. And he has become just an incredible young man.

 

So much grace.

 

So much grace.

 

Did you teach him that grace?

 

His mother taught him that grace.

How our family and how this community responded when our son was killed, for me, it was very eye-opening.  You know, having survived combat, having witnessed death, it was totally different when that knock came on our door.

 

2005.

 

  1. And then, it’s like our whole world just came screeching to a halt. And then, you know, over the years, I’ve become very close to the Vietnam veterans’ efforts, the memorials, et cetera.  Jan Scruggs is a very dear friend.  And you know, Memorial Day 2005, I was invited to come and be a speaker at the Memorial Day ceremony at The Wall.  It was not the first time I had been there, but that was my first experience when I got there and I looked at the fifty-eight thousand plus names in the wall, including like a whole panel of my guys.  And I just kinda like … stopped, caught my breath, and I said: Oh, my god.  Looking at all these names, you would think that the world would have come to a complete stop.  Because I know my family—

 

For some, it did.

 

Yeah.

 

Many, it did.

 

For some, it did.  And for, you know, my—my experience and my family’s experience, the world did come to a stop.  You know, but there it is, fifty-eight thousand plus names, and we’re still at war.

 

Shortly before our conversation with Allen Hoe in the summer of 2018, he and nine other local Vietnam veterans were honored at what the Army referred to as a long overdue ceremony.  While only ten veterans were selected, the Pentagon report said they represented a large number of soldiers who served in the Southeast Asia conflict, but were never given a proper military ceremony to present awards and medals.  Allen Hoe received a Bronze Star and Purple Heart at the ceremony, and told news reporters it was well worth the wait to have the brigade you went to war with recognized years and years after that war was over.

 

We thank Vietnam Combat Medic Allen Hoe for his time with us, and the work he continues doing in the civilian and military communities.  And we thank you, for joining us.  For more of Allen Hoe’s conversation, including how a flag originally purchased as a souvenir in Vietnam has earned a military record of its own, and why it’s in Hoe’s DNA to be passionate about horses and the sport of polo, please go to PBSHawaii.org and our Long Story Short archives.  I’m Leslie Wilcox for Long Story Short and PBS Hawai‘i.  Aloha nui.

 

For audio and written transcripts of all episodes of Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox, visit PBSHawaii.org.  To download free podcasts of Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox, go to the Apple iTunes Store or visit PBSHawaii.org.

 

People say: You do so much for the Army.  And I said: You know what, when I have a quiet moment, sitting in my backyard at Maunawili, looking up at Mount Olomana, which was one of Nainoa’s favorite places, I just kinda look up there and I says: All right, son, you didn’t think Dad had enough to do?  So, my mission has been to try and make the lives, and the comfort, and the memory of soldiers who put on the uniform every day for us a little bit better.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
Hiker Rescue Fines

 

The number of mountain rescues statewide continues to grow every year, with rescues on Oʻahu nearly tripling over a 10-year span ending in 2016. Emergency rescue squads are often called upon to rescue people who are trespassing on public property. Should the government charge these lawbreakers for the rescue service? Join us for a conversation on proposed Hiker Rescue Fines on the next INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI.

 

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Korla

Korla

 

Korla is the amazing story of John Roland Redd, an African American from Columbia, Missouri who migrated to Hollywood in 1939 and reinvented himself as a musician from India. As one of early television’s pioneering musical artists, Korla Pandit’s life was one of talent, determination, ingenuity and racial passing, a story not fully realized until after his death in 1998.

 

Preview

 

 

 

Allen Hoe
A Soldier’s Soldier

ALLEN HOE: A Soldier's Story by Emilie Howlett

 

Leslie Wilcox talks story with Allen HoeAs one of more than two million draftees called upon to fight in the Vietnam War, 19-year-old Allen Hoe thought he would serve his time and then his life would resume as normal. In his conversation on Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox, Hoe reflects on the experiences that turned this local boy into a soldier’s soldier.

 

Trained as a combat medic with the Army, he witnessed some of life’s greatest horrors, and these intense circumstances helped forge a life-long bond with the men he served alongside. The politics and ethics of the controversial war and the reasoning behind what they were fighting to preserve came second to “simply thinking about saving the life of your buddy on your right and on your left” recalls Hoe.

 

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX, Tuesday, November 13, 7:30 pmOn Mother’s Day 1968, one of his greatest fears played out in front of him. While he hung back at headquarters waiting to rejoin the other men in his unit, they were overrun. Hoe lost 18 men from his unit, while several more were captured and held prisoner.

 

While many would seek to close the door on this tragic chapter of their lives, Hoe extended his kindness towards those who felt the loss most profoundly. “I am reflective on the mothers of my men who didn’t make it. And over the past fifty years … that bond I had with their sons, I’ve developed with [the mothers] … It’s always been an obligation to assure their mothers whose sons never came home that their sons are superb young men.”

 

“... my mission has been to try and make the lives and the comfort and the memory of soldiers who put on the uniform every day for us a little bit better.” – Allen Hoe

 

Allen Hoe and the courageous men he had served with.

 

Along with the atrocities he witnessed as a combat medic, the loss of the men he served alongside would follow him long after his tour ended. However, life went on. After returning to Hawai‘i, Hoe found success as an attorney, got married and had two sons.

 

But tragedy struck again. In 2005, his elder son, 27-year-old Army First Lieutenant Nainoa Hoe, was killed by a sniper’s bullet while leading a foot patrol in Northern Iraq. “How our family and how this community responded when our son was killed, it was very eye-opening. You know, having survived combat, having witnessed death, was totally different when that knock came on our door.”

 

While visiting the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. on Memorial Day of that same year, seeing the names etched on The Wall, including those of his own men, took on a new resonance. “Looking at all these names, you would think that the world would have come to a complete stop,” Hoe says.

 

Allen Hoe’s own losses inspired a lifelong commitment to healing the wounds of war by supporting those touched by its effects. In June 2018, he was presented with the Mana O Ke Koa award, which honors his unparalleled patronage and his dedication and service toward soldiers, civilians and the U.S. Army Pacific. Hoe has transformed the tragedy in his life into generosity, serving as a guiding light for so many. “So, my mission has been to try and make the lives and the comfort and the memory of soldiers who put on the uniform every day for us a little bit better.”

 

 

Oregon Revealed: Coastal Wonder

 

This travelogue highlights Oregon’s stunning landscapes and spectacular coastline stretching from the bridges of Astoria to the rolling dunes of Bandon. Featured on this dramatic aerial tour are cliffs, estuaries, ports and small towns, including Tillamook Bay, Cape Kiwanda, Coos Bay and more.

 

 

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX
They Did It Their Way

 

Long Story Short looks back on three previous guests who paved their own paths in life and followed their instincts, often against the grain of society’s expectations. Featured: Marion Higa, who spoke truth to power as Hawai‘i’s State Auditor; Kitty Lagareta (now Kitty Yannone), CEO of public relations firm Communications Pacific, whose career has been punctuated by a healthy dose of risk; and Kimi Werner, who gave up her success in competitive spearfishing to reconnect with the ocean in a more meaningful way as an environmental advocate.

 

This program will be rebroadcast on Sunday, May 6 at 4:00 pm and 11:30 pm.

 

They Did It Their Way Audio

 

They Did It Their Way Transcript

 

Transcript

 

MARION HIGA: At times, it felt almost personal.  But I didn’t take it that way, because it was my job.  And I always go back to the constitutional language; this is what the constitutional drafters expected of this office.  And as long as I’m doing that, then any governor can complain as much as they like.

 

KITTY YANNONE: I’ve had Democrats publicly won’t have anything to do with me. But late at night, when they need some advice, they call me, and they return my calls.  I’ve had media people.  I think when you’re a little more outspoken and they have a sense you’re authentic about it, they return your calls.  And you know what?  It never stopped me from doing what I do, with the utmost integrity and professionalism.

 

KIMI WERNER: All I just told myself is: I want diving to always give me that feeling that I had of bringing home those little fish, you know, on that first dive, and knowing in my heart that I was happy and proud of that, and that I felt satisfied with that.  And that’s the feeling that I wanted.  I didn’t quite know what type of path that would take me on, or how it would affect my career, but I just knew I wanted that back.

 

Marion Higa stood up to two governors to stop an auditing practice that she felt was inappropriate.  Kitty Yannone defied the local political system by supporting a Republican for governor.  And Kimi Werner was at the peak of her powers when she quit national spearfishing competitions.  They followed their instincts and their hearts, and they did it their way, next, on Long Story Short.

 

One-on-one engaging conversations with some of Hawai‘i’s most intriguing people: Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox.

 

Aloha mai kākou. I’m Leslie Wilcox.  Sometimes, it takes an enormous amount of courage to do what you know to be right, when others want you to do otherwise, when it would be much easier to simply to go with the flow.  On this episode of Long Story Short, we revisit three women who have previously been guests on this program.  Each followed her own path, respectively refusing to give in to political pressure, community disapproval, or turning away from a popular identity that did not reflect her core values.

 

We begin with Marion Higa.  For almost two decades, she was the Hawai‘i State Auditor, investigating the use of State resources and exposing inefficiencies. She as unflinching when agencies criticized her, knowing she had a job to do, and believing she was representing the best interests of the people of Hawai‘i.  One of the highest visibility audits she performed was on the Superferry. The State government wanted the Superferry to be up and running as soon as possible.  But the community was divided in its support for the ferry. The State Auditor was called in to analyze the administration’s environmental review.

 

The environmental groups had challenged the lack of the EIS early enough.  I think it wasn’t completed by the time they started sailing because you might remember that the first ship was delivered. And I think Superferry was trying to avoid the timetable, and so they had planned to start service to Nawiliwili, again, because they could do that most easily.  And people in Kaua‘i jumped in the water and kept them from docking, so they never docked.  They had to turn around and come back.  Now, in the course of all of this, then the State had put up forty-two million dollars’ worth of improvements.  But because of the way they designed or had to design these improvements, and the sourcing of these materials, it could not be used, because they were not U.S.-sourced. That was the other problem.

 

What did you hear from the administration about that?

 

Oh, they objected, of course, to our findings, and had their own responses. But I mean, we could support our findings.

 

What was your recommendation? 

 

I think our recommendation was … well, first of all, the EIS; I mean, there was no question that they had to follow the EIS.  But I think eventually, we softened the recommendation, because there was the other court case that was still proceeding and was going to the Supreme Court.  So, I think we predicted that nothing be hard and fast decided until that case was settled. Eventually, the court came down, one could say, on the side of the environmentalists, and required the EIS.

 

How did you feel about the stinging rebuke from the administration?

 

I didn’t take it personally.  I mean, I expected it, because there was so much at stake.  And I understood that even the legislators, some of the legislators who had been avid supporters would be disappointed, at best.

 

Especially since they had put through a bill that allowed … it seemed it was written for a particular company, but general language was used, except the timeframe was so short that it looked like it was written specifically for the Superferry.

 

Yes; it looked like special purpose legislation, which again, is not permitted by State law.

 

And so, that was people you worked for who were on the other end of criticism.

 

That’s right.  And so, you know, they’re party to that process.  But again, it’s like: Well, that’s my job, I have to say it the way it is.

 

Even if it’s your job, and you say you’re doing it on the straight and narrow, what’s it like riding that wave, where basically are taking shots at you as you take that position?

 

You know, like I said, it’s my job.  This is what the constitution was intended for us to do, and if we can defend the work.  And so, the process seems so laborious, and it’s so careful.  There’s a whole system; it’s all electronic now, the working papers are electronic.  But there’s a citation system involved in our work, so every fact can be traced back to a source document.  And so, working for the Auditor’s Office is not easy.  You have to be very meticulous, and be able to defend your work. But as long as the overall conclusions are supported by this mountain of evidence, it’s all defensible.

 

I always used to think it was so funny when you’d come walking into a legislative hearing room, hearing about an audit of the administration.  I mean, how tall are you?

 

Four-ten; barely four-ten, more like four-nine.

 

Four-ten; and it was as if a towering figure were coming in, this shadow was entering the room.  Did you get that feeling, that’s how people were reacting to you?

 

Sometimes; yes.  Uh-huh; uh-huh.

 

And you wouldn’t back down, either.

 

No, because that’s not my job.  My job is to support the report, because that stands for our work.

 

Any memorable exchanges between you and someone else?

 

A few times.  I guess I was at … Ways and Means once, and I had a minority member ask me … hunched over the table like this, he says: Ms. Higa … who do you work for?  Who do you work for?  Ms. Higa, who do you work for?  And I said: The people of Hawaii.  No; who do you really work for?  The people of Hawai‘i.  What he was trying to get me to say was, I work for the majority party.  And that’s not who I worked for.  I said: The constitution says I’m the auditor, I’m the State Auditor, I work for the people.  So, he gave up.

 

Kitty Yannone, formerly known as Kitty Lagareta, started her professional journey as a volunteer fundraiser for the Ronald McDonald House.  This eventually led to her present career as the CEO of a successful company offering integrated communication services.  Kitty Yannone is known for following her instincts.  She’s bucked public opinion, and risked her business.  One of her biggest risks was in ardently supporting a Republican candidate for governor.

 

I’d met Linda Lingle when she was mayor of Maui through some volunteer work with high school students that we’d gone over there to do, and I didn’t know her very well at all.  And she called one day and wanted to meet with me.  And my husband answered the phone, and he said: The mayor of Maui wants to talk to you.  I’m like: Why does she want to talk to me?  It was like, a Sunday.  I go: What does she want?  And he goes: Why don’t you talk to her and find out.  She asked if she could meet, and she was thinking about running for governor in a couple years.  This was maybe a year or two.  And so, I went and met with her.  I think I spent five hours asking her questions, and I knew nothing about politics. And she said: That’s okay, we’ll figure it out; it’s a big race, I need a communications person, I think you’re kind of a smart person.  And I’d volunteered on a couple political things, but nobody ever wanted to use that part of me they wanted me to stuff envelopes, which was fine, or do stuff which was happy to do, and it’s important stuff.  But I was kind of intrigued by having somebody want me to be involved in the strategic side.  So, I started helping her in ’98, and I immediately got calls from a lot of people around town, friends, parents of kids.  You know, if you’re gonna do politics at this time, it’s really kinda stupid to get involved with the party that has no power.  And I said: Yeah, but I like this candidate, and I really want to do this.  And I didn’t lose any clients; no clients said: I’m gonna quit.  They just, I think, were kind of bemused.  And Linda came within five thousand votes, and it was a huge learning and a wonderful experience for me, except for the losing part. But we all took it harder than she did. And before we had even let the dust settle, she was saying: We’re gonna do this again in 2002.  And I remember thinking: Eee, I don’t know.  But of course, I was onboard for 2002.

 

Had you suffered business-wise, advocating for her?

 

You never know what you don’t get.  I think once people realized she was a serious candidate, I certainly did, you know, I think.  And I tend to vote for people, and like people more than parties.  I don’t really feel connected to parties.  I’m sort of a fiscal conservative and a social liberal. And particularly during that time, it was like somebody had branded a big R on my forehead; she’s a Republican. And all that they equate with anybody of any political party is interesting.  And so, that was a new experience for me.

 

But you weren’t following the playbook of most public relations executives.  You were following your mind and, to some extent, your heart.

 

Yeah. You know, I believe in that, because I think a lot of executives, if they can, they do that.  And I just feel even when it’s a learning experience, having the experience makes me better overall.  And that was a learning experience.  And by gosh, in 2002, we pulled it off, and that was interesting. And I thought we were done.  That was the other thing, kind of still had naïveté, not having been in politics.  It was like: Okay, we’re done, I can go back to my life.  And I remember Linda called and she said: You know, I think you would be one of the people I want to recommend for Board of Regents.  And I remember saying: Oh, why that?  I mean, I don’t know.

 

Talk about political.

 

She had to talk me into it.

 

What you got into was a mire with the president of the University, Evan Dobelle.

 

Yeah.

 

And a very slippery situation.  And your expertise is public relations, but it was very hard to manage it. 

 

Yeah; and it’s hard to be in it and manage something.  I know that.  Therapists will tell you: I can’t do therapy in my own family.  When you’re one of the players in something, and everybody’s got their own opinion, you’re not the PR managing something then, I think.

 

And as the chair of the Board of Regents.

 

Yeah.

 

I mean, I think there was a perception at some time that you were bungling it.

 

Yeah; yeah.  I actually thought I was.  I knew it was bungled, but I also had the perspective of there was a whole bunch of stuff.  You know, it was an employee-employer relationship between the Board and Evan. And there are certain laws you have to follow, confidentiality and things.  So, we were not in a position to say: Hey, we tried this, we did this. And I think the employee can say whatever they want pretty much, really.  And you see that over and over.  So, that was a disadvantage, and it was hard.  The other part was, you know, you will never know the effort we made to do it carefully.  And the sense, I think, that was there was that, I have this contract, no way you’re gonna get me out of it, and I’m not going anywhere.  And as time went on, I think it became clear the University was suffering, and we had to do something.  And in fact, our creditors told us that.  And it felt very bungled.  It felt like there were lots of pieces that you couldn’t control.  It was horrible watching the public perception of it, and knowing there was another story, but you can’t be the one to tell it. You’re the employer.  That was really rugged, I think for all of us. And yet, I found the decision we made to be the right one.  I’ve never regretted that decision.  How it unfolded and what it looked like on the outside; yeah, there was a lot of regret about that, but not the decision.  And I don’t think any of us did.

 

So, the right outcome.

 

The right outcome; and it really was.  You know, that’s the decision.  I mean, there were regents who quit because they didn’t want to go down.  They knew what needed to be done, but they didn’t want to be in the middle of all that.  And there were some amazing people who stuck around and said: This needs to be done for the good of our university.  And I think there is some vindication in what happened at Westfield College.  It’s pretty much what happened here.  That’s taken a different more public turn, I think.  But came many years later, but it was there, and we did make the right decision. And under David McClain’s leadership, we went on to have some finished capital campaign, move a lot of things forward at the University.  And I look at it that way and say: Yeah, there was some personal pain, and I could have avoided it, but maybe it wouldn’t have been the right people in the room to make the decisions that I think were good ones if all of us had done that.  I’ve never found discomfort to be an inhibiting factor.  I used to give a speech after—this was when they were saying: Fear is your friend.  I use it as like, rocket fuel.  When I feel that, it tells me to turn on all my senses and look at something carefully. But sometimes, it really energizes you. And maybe that’s what I get from my mom and dad.  ‘Cause my mom and dad, in their own way, overcame a lot of stuff in their lives, built a really nice life for them and their family, and still do.  And they had certain values, and it didn’t include being afraid, or being uncomfortable, being something that pulls you up.  Yeah.

 

I’m sure you had some sleepless nights over the regents matter.

 

Many; I think I didn’t sleep for like a whole year.

 

And that was okay with you, ‘cause you felt like you were doing the right thing?

 

I felt like we were doing the right thing, and I felt like, you know, sometimes that’s what they call—that’s what I consider when I see people go through that, and I do with my clients sometimes, who are struggling with hard decisions and want to do the right decisions.  And I think I’m grateful I’ve had that experience a few times in my life, because I think that’s what you call political courage.  I call it that when I see it in other people.  And when you’re in it, it doesn’t feel like any kind of courage; it feels like a nightmare.  But in the end, if something good came out or a group of people were able to come together to make something happen that was right or needed to happen, or bigger than they could do on their own.

 

What if it fails?

 

Yeah; it does.  I failed in ’98.  Do you know how many people wouldn’t even talk to me after ’98?  She’s the one who went to the other side, you know.  I lived through it.  I don’t know; I feel like I have to live in this world and do things that I think are important.  I can’t always defer to, that might hurt my business, or that may not.  Then I’d just be kind of a shallow person, I feel.  You have gauge with life and with issues, and with people, and the world you live in.

 

Kimberly Maile Reiko Werner, known as Kimi, is a roving ambassador for the American Clothes Company Patagonia, as well as a trained chef and self-taught artist.  She grew up in rural Maui, tagging along on ocean dives with her father as he hunted for fish to feed the family.  Unsatisfied with her early career choices, she started thinking that maybe her childhood pastimes could still be part of her life.  She learned to spearfish, became an accomplished free diver, and a national spearfishing champion.  Yet, despite the success and recognition she was gaining through her awards, she realized that spearfishing competition wasn’t the right thing for her, either.

 

You know, my first tournament, that first national championships, that was really special.  And coming back home to Hawai‘i was just the best feeling in the world, because Hawaii is just the most supportive, loyal, wonderful hometown, I think, that anyone could ever ask for, in my opinion.  And the way that people supported me was something that I just was so grateful for.  But I think after that, it was never quite the same, because I almost just felt like I just always had a title to defend.  I did continue to win in competing, but it was just never as fulfilling to me.  And I noticed that even when I would go diving, you know, on my own just for food, all I was thinking about was competition, and you know, I started to think of fish as points, rather than even as food.  And once I realized that, I didn’t like it.  I just realized it’s changing me.  You know, it’s changing this thing that’s so sacred to me.  It’s something that my parents, you know, taught me these values through this.  And it’s not about these values anymore; it’s really about trophies and winning, and recognition.  And this was the thing that really made my life fulfilling again.  Am I really gonna do this to it?  Am I gonna take it to a level where it’s all about, you know, chasing titles?  Like, I didn’t like that.  And so, just for those own personal reasons of how I found it affecting me, I did walk away from competition.

 

I saw you do a TEDx talk, and you said that even though you knew it was the right thing to do, it didn’t mean that other people weren’t very disappointed in you, and that you felt really bad about it, too.

 

Oh, definitely.  I mean, it was one of the toughest things I’ve done, because it was right in the peak of what could have been my career.  You know, I had sponsors now, and you know, people that believed in me, people that looked up to me.  And all of a sudden, I was just gonna walk away from it.  And it let down a lot of people, and definitely disappointed people. And for myself too, I mean, I did feel a sense of, you know, confusion, because I felt so lost.  I didn’t really know who I was without that.  It had become so the tunnel vision of my life, and pretty much, you know, everything that was confident-building seemed to come from that department.  It was the first time where, you know, my art started to sell more, because my name was out there more.  And it just seemed like it was something that was causing so much personal gain that for me to turn and walk away from it, I definitely felt like a loser.  You know, I felt like a waste of talent, and I felt like I didn’t quite know if I would like … you know.  I didn’t know the effects it was gonna have.  I didn’t know how much it would bum people out, or if I would just never be really supported again, really.

 

What happened, then?

 

It took me a while, actually.  It was probably a year where a lot of times I would go out diving, and all of a sudden, it wasn’t the same happy place it used to be.  You know, when I say I’m totally present in the moment, and those voices in my head go quiet, it wasn’t happening; these voices were just telling me that I was a loser, and I was failure, and you know, what are you doing, like why are you quitting.  And it was still, you know, looking at the fish as points, and so then, I’d have to get out of the water with no fish.  And then, I really would beat myself up.  Like, I’m not even good at this anymore, I can’t even dive ‘cause my mind’s all messed up.  And I got pretty depressed.  But through that, you know, I just kinda took some breaks from diving and whatnot. And then this one day, couple friends of mine like said: You need to get back in the water.  Like, let’s go.  And so, we all went out on our kayaks, and again, my brain was just still fighting itself, and I just felt like I wasn’t diving the I way I dive; I didn’t have it anymore.  And so, I’m like: Let’s just pack it up and go, guys.  I know what you’re trying to do, and I know you’re trying to bring me back, but it’s just not fun for me anymore, and there’s nothing worse than the feeling of actually being out here and it not being fun anymore, so I just want to go home.  And they said: Okay, let’s go.  But then, I said: You know what, let me just take one last drop.  And I put my spear gun on my kayak, didn’t even take it down with me, and I just took a dive.  And I had my two buddies, you know, spotting me from the surface, so it was safe.  But I just took a dive, and just told them to watch me, you know, took a dive.  And I got down to the bottom, and I just laid in the sand.  I just crossed my arms and I put my face in the sand.  And I laid there, and I let every single critic come through my head, every single voice, every single thing that I had beat myself up about, like, I just let it come.  And I listened to every single put-down, worry, concern, fear.  And they all came, one after another, and I just waited, and I just still waited, held my breath.  Okay, what else you got; give it to me.  You know, I just waited, and waited, and waited until there was nothing left.  And when there was nothing left, there was not one more voice that could say anything, you know, hadn’t already heard.  Like, it just went quiet.  And as soon as it went quiet, I opened my eyes and I’m on the bottom of the ocean, and I was just back.  I think the competition, and just more than that even, just the expectations that I was putting on myself.  And I think that can happen a lot with anybody who tries to turn their passion into a career; it can get quite confusing.  I think a lot of times, we go into jobs because we’re so passionate about our craft, and then before we know it, you know, we’re not really enjoying it anymore, and we’re going through the motions because we’re trying to hit these certain marks of society, whether it’s financial success, or I need that house, or I need that car, and before you know it, your own beautiful passion that kinda becomes this vehicle for living unauthentically, and doing things based on expectations that were never really yours to begin with, maybe. Because before, to me, it was never truly about like, oh, that moment when you spear your fish.  But it was the feeling that I felt when I would take a drop, and just the serenity that would come over me, and just this feeling of welcome home.  And when everything just turned quiet, and I was still there holding my breath, and I looked up and I just saw my two friends, and I saw the sun just sparkling through the ocean surface, and I just looked at the beautiful ocean and hear the noise, you know, the sounds of the ocean, and that was it.  I was like, that’s the feeling; that’s the feeling that satisfies me.  And soon as I came up, I didn’t even have to say anything; they knew.  They knew exactly what had happened, they knew exactly. And I smiled at them, and they were just like: You’re back.  And I’m like: I’m back.  And that was that.  And after that, then I just started diving for food again, and just realizing like that’s something sacred to me, and I’m going to protect it with everything that I have.  I’m gonna do everything I can to keep this pure.  Even if it means no success comes from this, this is mine.

 

Kimi Werner, Kitty Yannone, and Marion Higa followed their instincts and listened to their own voices to do it their way. Mahalo to these three women of Hawai‘i for sharing their stories with us.  And mahalo to you, for joining us.  For PBS Hawaii and Long Story Short, I’m Leslie Wilcox.  Aloha nui.

 

For audio and written transcripts of all episodes of Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox, visit PBSHawaii.org.  To download free podcasts of Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox, go to the Apple iTunes Store or visit PBSHawaii.org.

 

I still get approached by people, total strangers.  You know, I mean, it’s always complimentary.  I know it’s a curiosity.  I mean, I go into restaurants, and I know people recognize me. You can tell when you’re recognized.

 

And so, do they say: What did you really think?

 

Sometimes, people will say that.  But most of the time, people will come up and thank me for the work that we did.  So, I’d like to think that there were some good effects, for some folks, anyway.

 

Things that I have done that were much harder learning experiences than I anticipated. Ronald McDonald House was that way at times, and certainly Board of Regents, and getting involved politically. There are things in my company I don’t have a business background, and I’ve had to learn through trial and error, experience.  I wish I’d known more, but I came out the other side knowing it now, and I don’t regret much of anything.  I think, you know, I’ve had sad things and hard things, and it’s life.  And you know, as long as I keep getting up and experiencing it, I’m kinda happy.

 

I think by following that passion and really making the commitment to be true to my love for it, surprisingly, it did bring success, and just in so much more of a meaningful way.  Because now, it wasn’t just any sponsors that I was working with; it was sponsors and companies like Patagonia who truly hold the same values as me, who aren’t just, you know, trying to sell an image or, do what’s trendy, but really, really believe in trying to make this world better, trying to give back to these beautiful natural elements of our world.

 

 

 

RICK STEVES’ EUROPE
Assisi and Italian Country Charm

 

Join writer and host Rick Steves as he experiences the local culture, cuisine and fun in some of Europe’s most interesting places.

 

Assisi and Italian Country Charm
In the Italian countryside, Rick watches prosciutto and pecorino cheese being made. In Assisi – the hometown of St. Francis – he explores its stony center before trekking to its awe-inspiring basilica, built on the tomb of the beloved saint.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
The Right of Access

 

More than 50 years ago, under Chief Justice William S. Richardson, the Supreme Court of the State of Hawai‘i ruled the public had the right to access all beaches throughout our State. But for decades there have been disputes — clashes throughout the islands — involving access pathways that lead to our beaches.

 

What do you think? Is is time we settled this “right of access” dispute linked to one of the most historically significant rulings in our history?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 


PROGRAM LISTINGS
Oct. 25 – 31, 2015

 

Arts, Drama, Culture

 

THE GREAT BRITISH BAKING SHOW

Pastry

Sun., Oct. 25, 1:00 pm

New

 

Follow the trials and tribulations of 13 passionate amateur bakers whose goal
is to be named the U.K.’s best amateur baker. Each week, the bakers tackle a
different skill, the difficulty of which increases as the competition unfolds.
Hosts Mel Giedroyc and Sue Perkins coax them through their Signature, Technical
and Showstopper challenges, under the scrutiny of judges Mary Berry and Paul
Hollywood. After 10 weeks of whisking, crimping and piping, only one can
emerge victorious.

 

Pastry
The remaining six bakers are challenged to update old- fashioned suet puddings;
create perfect religieuses – delicate choux buns filled with
creme patissiere; and make three different kinds of puffed pastries.

 

HOME FIRES ON MASTERPIECE

Part 4 of 6

Sun., Oct. 25, 7:00 pm

New

 

Witness the bitter rivalry between Frances Barden (Samantha Bond of Downton
Abbey
fame) and Joyce Cameron (Francesca Annis) to control the Women’s
Institute in a rural English town as it struggles with the onset of World War II.

 

Part 4 of 6
Frances plans an air raid shelter. Alison breaks the law; so does Miriam. Steph
hides a secret that threatens the farm. Kate gets shattering news.

 

INDIAN SUMMERS ON MASTERPIECE

Part 5 of 9

Sun., Oct. 25, 8:00 pm

New

 

Julie Walters stars as the glamorous doyenne of an English social club in
the twilight era of British rule in India. Set in a subtropical paradise, the
series dramatizes the collision of the high-living English ruling class with
the local people agitating for Indian independence. As the drama unfolds, the
two sides alternately clash and merge in an intricate game of power, politics
and passion. Also starring in the lavish production are Henry Lloyd-Hughes,
Jemima West, Nikesh Patel, Roshan Seth and Lillete Dubey.

 

Part 5 of 9
Ralph plays politics at his engagement bash. Eugene tells Cynthia a shocking
secret. Adam and his mother make a surprise visit.

 

THE GUILTY

Part 1 of 3

Sun., Oct. 25, 9:00 pm

New

 

Follow DCI Maggie Brand (Tamsin Greig) as she leads a new investigation into
the five-year-old case of a boy’s disappearance during a neighborhood cookout.
Driven by her obsession to discover what happened, she risks her own happy
family life.

 

Part 1 of 3
DCI Brand, under pressure to charge her prime suspect, is still unconvinced
they’ve found the killer. As she begins to piece together the child’s final
hours, she finds her instinct as a mother at war with her desire to solve
the crime.

 

GREAT FIRE

Part 2 of 4

Sun., Oct. 25, 10:00 pm

New

 

Watch an epic drama about the 1666 Great Fire of London, when the city burned
for four days. Andrew Buchan stars as Thomas Farriner, whose bakery in Pudding
Lane was the flashpoint for the inferno. Also starring Charles Dance and
Jack Huston.

 

Part 2 of 4
Thomas flees the burning city with his family. Shocked at the speed of the
inferno’s spread, Pepys calls on the king to address the mayor’s failing efforts.
Thomas’ sister-in-law, Sarah, is imprisoned in Newgate as her son searches for her.

 

NA MELE

Na Palapalai

Mon., Oct. 26, 7:30 pm

Encore

 

Na Hoku Hanohano Award-winning high energy trio Na Palapalai brings their falsetto
style of Hawaiian music to the PBS Hawaii Studios in this special encore
presentation.

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW

Tulsa, OK, Part 1 of 3

Mon., Oct. 26, 8:00 pm

Encore

 

Host Mark L. Walberg and appraiser Nicholas Lowry head to the Pawnee Bill Ranch
to look at some show-stopping Wild West posters. Highlights include a poignant
signed note from Mother Teresa to a wood-carver who sent her a walking cane
during her final years, and a custom model 1894 Winchester rifle that may have
been used in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show.

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW

Chicago, IL, Part 2 of 3

Mon., Oct. 26, 9:00 pm

New

 

Discover an eclectic array of discoveries in Chicago, such as 1989 Keith Haring
graffiti art, a 1910 Walter Johnson All-Star watch, and a Walt Whitman Civil War
letter. Also: take a field trip to the Chicago Civic Opera.

 

I’LL HAVE WHAT PHIL’S HAVING

Barcelona

Mon., Oct. 26, 10:00 pm

New

 

Journey with Phil Rosenthal, creator of the TV series Everybody Loves
Raymond
, as he learns from chefs, vendors, culinary leaders and style-setters.
Rosenthal visits the kitchens on and off the well-worn gastronomic path that
keep traditions alive and create new ones.

 

Barcelona
Venture with Phil on a tapas crawl and even a vermouth bar. He’s also in
for a lesson on jamon, Spain’s most prized culinary export.

 

JAPANESE AMERICAN LIVES

Stories from Tohuku

Mon., Oct. 26, 11:00 pm

Encore

 

After the devastating 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami in Japan, survivors are
still struggling to rebuild. The Japanese American community has continued to
raise money and organize aid trips to the region. This powerful documentary
explores both the endurance and frustration of the survivors and the hope
inspired by the visitors.

 

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX

Karen Radius

Tues., Oct. 27, 7:30 pm

New

 

Growing up in Chicago, Karen Radius learned values from her working class
parents, neither of whom attended high school. After passing the bar exam in
Hawaii, Radius’ first job was with Legal Aid, serving some of the poorest people
in Hawaii. As a Family Court judge, Karen Radius learned that juvenile girls who
haven’t succeeded on regular probation needed a different type of juvenile
justice system. So she created Girls Court. “Girls Court is all about…working
on the relationships…within the family,” Radius explains. “(it’s) not just,
‘Did you comply with the court’s order and what the court told you to do’ … but
let’s figure out your life and let’s come up with a life’s plan for you.”

 

This program will be rebroadcast on Wednesday, Oct. 28 at 11:00 pm and
Sunday, Nov. 1 at 4:00 pm.

 

A Few Good Pie Places

Tues., Oct. 27, 11:00 pm

Encore

 

Come along on a tour of fruity and creamy pie shops from New York to Montana.
Meet the bakers who know how to make dough, add spices to fillings and crisscross
a lattice top. Classic apple pies abound, but there is also cherry, blueberry,
fluffy coconut cream, cherry lattice and sweet potato.

 

A CHEF’S LIFE

Eggs A Dozen Ways

Wed., Oct. 28, 7:30 pm

New

 

A Chef’s Life is a cooking and documentary series that takes viewers inside the
life of Chef Vivian Howard, who, with her husband Ben Knight, opens a fine dining
restaurant in her small hometown in Eastern North Carolina. Each episode follows
Vivian out of the kitchen and into cornfields, strawberry patches and hog farms
as she hunts down the ingredients that inspire her menus. Using a chef’s modern
sensibilities, Vivian explores Southern cuisine, past and present – one ingredient
at a time. A celebration of true farm-to-table food, the series combines the action
and drama of a high-pressure business with the joys and stresses of family life.

 

Eggs A Dozen Ways
Vivian finally makes good on a promise to cook for a friend’s supper club, and she
seizes the moment to experiment with an egg dish that she hopes will wow New
York City’s James Beard House crowd. She visits with her egg producer and
learns the ins and outs of egg varieties, from chickens to ducks to guineas to
partridges. She takes us through how to boil an egg and shares Miss Scarlett’s
secrets for a southern party staple: the perfect deviled egg.

 

PBS HAWAII PRESENTS

Keola Beamer: Mālama Ko Aloha (Keep Your Love)

Thurs., Oct. 29, 9:00 pm

Encore

 

This program tells the story of Keola Beamer’s journey through song. The respected
composer and slack key guitarist partners with an array of musicians, including
Native American flutist R. Carlos Nakai, American jazz pianist Geoffrey Keezer
and Hawaiian vocalist Raiatea Helm. These collaborations demonstrate how one
can retain cultural identity while openly sharing with others to create
something new – a global art form. This multicultural exchange reaches its
zenith when Beamer performs a Hawaiian-language version of John Lennon’s
“Imagine,” with musicians playing traditional Hawaiian, Chinese,
Japanese, Australian, Classical European and American Jazz instruments. In
another particularly moving segment, Keola accompanies his wife Moanalani
Beamer as she performs a hula as a quadriplegic woman who magically regains use
of her limbs in a dream.

 

GLOBE TREKKER

Papua New Guinea Islands

Thurs., Oct. 29, 10:00 pm

Encore

 

The trekkers explore New Britain Island, the largest in the Bismarck Archipelago
of Papua New Guinea. Inhabited by the indigenous Papuans and the Austronesians,
the island was captured by the Japanese during World War II. Today the island’s
traditional cultures are diverse and complex but there are several ancient
traditions which remain active today. Next, we visit the township of Rabaul,
once the provincial capital until it was destroyed in 1994 by a massive
volcanic eruption.

 

WELL READ

David McCullough, The Wright Brothers

Thurs., Oct. 29, 11:00 pm

New

 

This series features lively, engaging conversations about ideas in literature.
Host Terry Tazioli introduces the latest books — both fiction and non-fiction
— and interviews noted authors about the themes in their latest works. Following
each interview, Seattle Times book editor Mary Ann Gwinn joins Tazioli to further
explore the literary themes of the week’s book and to recommend related authors
and other reading material.

 

David McCullough: The Wright Brothers
David McCullough has received two Pulitzer Prizes for his past work. In his new
book, The Wright Brothers, he shares the story of the bond, work ethic and
dedication the Wright Brothers had to push their invention to new heights.

 

LIVE FROM LINCOLN CENTER

Danny Elfman’s Music from the Films of Tim Burton

Fri., Oct. 30, 9:00 pm

New

 

Composer and performer Danny Elfman descends on Lincoln Center with a symphony
orchestra and choir, led by conductor John Mauceri, as well as a colorful
assortment of Tim Burton fans. The evening includes performances of Elfman’s most
beloved scores from films in collaboration with Tim Burton such as Batman,
Beetlejuice, Edward Scissorhands and The Nightmare Before
Christmas
. Accompanying the music are film clips and original sketches and
storyboards created by Tim Burton.

 

A CRAFTSMAN’S LEGACY

The Metal Engraver

Sat., Oct. 31, 1:00 pm

New

 

Host Eric Gorges goes on a quest to discover the true craftsmen in today’s world.
Traveling across the country, Gorges interviews the men and women responsible
for carrying the tools, trades and traditions of fine craftsmanship into the
21st century. Gorges, a welder by trade, meets and interviews master craftsmen,
and learns why they chose their craft, where they learned their skills, how
they live using their talents and the challenges and importance of keeping
those traditions alive in a modern-day world.

 

The Metal Engraver
Eric meets metal engraver David Riccardo, who creates art with intricate
flourishes and filigree.

 

THE MIND OF A CHEF

Evolution

Sat., Oct. 31, 7:00 pm

New

 

Ever since 1999, when Chef Gabrielle Hamilton put canned sardines and Triscuits
on the first menu of her tiny, 30-seat East Village restaurant, Prune, she has
nonchalantly broken countless rules of the food world. Prune has always been an
idiosyncratic restaurant, with no culinary mission other than to serve what
Hamilton likes to eat in an environment in which she wants to eat. Hamilton won
the James Beard Foundation’s Best Chef NYC in 2011 and is author of a
best-selling memoir, Blood, Bones and Butter, which garnered a James
Beard Award for Writing and Literature in 2012.

 

Evolution
Venture into the unknown with Chef Gabrielle as she explores what’s next for her
career and the challenges associated with making the decision to step away from
life in the kitchen. Legendary chef Jacques Pepin demonstrates techniques and
Chef Mario Batali offers advice.

 

JOSEPH ROSENDO’S TRAVELSCOPE

Ontario’s Central Counties: Multi-Cultural Adventures

Sat., Oct. 31, 7:30 pm

New

 

Ontario’s Central Counties offers a mosaic of historic gristmill villages, verdant
farmlands and towns that thrive because of their multi-cultural population.
During his Central Counties explorations Joseph cycles through the rich Durham
farmlands on an agri-tourism adventure that includes fruit wine tasting and a
visit to Tyrone Mill, one of only two operating mills in Ontario. In the York
region he steps back in time at the Black Creek Pioneer Village for a taste of
what life was like in the early days of Canada and fast forwards into the
present at the Taste of Asia Festival in Markham.

 

50 Years with Peter, Paul and Mary

Sat., Oct. 31, 8:00 pm

Encore

 

Celebrate the impact of the trio that provided America’s soundtrack for
generations and combined artistry with activism for five decades. This program
features rare and previously unseen television footage, including a BBC program
from the early 1960s that embodies many of the trio’s best performances and most
popular songs. This is Peter, Paul and Mary at the peak of their artistry, a time
when this popular and influential trio dominated the Billboard music charts.

 

From the group’s emergence in Greenwich Village, to the Civil Rights and anti-war
era of the 1960s, through the decades of their later advocacy and music, to
Mary Travers’ moving memorial, and finally to the present, where their legacy
continues to inform and inspire successive generations, this far deeper and
more intimate exploration of the trio reveals the impact of their artistry and
activism on their generation and the world. Songs include: “Five Hundred
Miles,” “The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face,” “Puff, the Magic Dragon,” “If I
Had a Hammer (The Hammer Song),” “Blowin’ in the Wind” and “The Times They Are
a-Changin’.”

 

Red Rock Serenade

Sat., Oct. 31, 10:00 pm

Encore

 

Take a meditative, cinematic journey through the breathtaking scenery of the
American West’s iconic red rock country, including Arches, Bryce Canyon, Zion,
Canyonlands, Capitol Reef and Grand Canyon National Parks – all set to music by
some of the world’s greatest classical composers, including Bach, Brahms,
Chopin and Beethoven.

 

AUSTIN CITY LIMITS

Don Henley

Sat., Oct. 31, 11:00 pm

New

 

Savor songs from Don Henley’s first solo album in 15 years, Cass County.

 

Public Affairs

 

THE OPEN MIND

Sun., Oct. 25, 6:00 pm

New

 

Hosted by Alexander Heffner, this weekly public affairs program is a thoughtful
excursion into the world of ideas, exploring issues of national and public concern
with the most compelling minds of our times.

 

FRONTLINE

Inside Assad’s Syria

Tues., Oct. 27, 10:00 pm

New

 

Correspondent Martin Smith reports from government-controlled areas in Syria while
the war rages. With on-the-ground reporting and firsthand accounts from Syrians
caught in the crisis, the film shines new light on the ongoing conflict.

 

HIKI NŌ

Thurs., Oct. 29, 7:30 pm

New

 

This episode is the third in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses
on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is ha’aha’a, which
means humbleness and humility. Each of the following stories reflects this theme:

 

The top story comes from the students at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on
Kauai. They feature a Kauai resident named Moses Hamilton who learned
humbleness and humility when he had to start all over again after a tragic car
accident that left him a quadraplegic. While undergoing re-hab, Moses took up
mouth painting (painting by holding and manipulating the paint brush in one’s
mouth), and is a now a successful artist who sells his paintings at a shopping
mall in Hanalei, Kauai.

 

Also featured are student-created stories from the following schools:

 

Ka Waihona o Ka Naauao (Oahu): Uncle George, a native Hawaiian stand-up paddle
board instructor in West Oahu, exemplifies humbleness by giving away something
of great value – paddle board lessons – for free.

 

Roosevelt High School (Oahu): A Roosevelt High School student uses his experience
growing up in poverty-stricken countries to instill a sense of humility in his
fellow students.

 

Lahaina Intermediate School (Maui): A retiree-turned-elementary-school crossing
guard proves that a humbleness of spirit comes in handy when dedicating your life
to the safety of young children in your community.

 

Mililani Middle School (Oahu): After years in the spotlight as star quarterback
for the UH football team, Garrett Gabriel choses the much more humble profession
of counseling.

 

Iolani School (Oahu): The value of ha’aha’a, or humbleness, teaches us that we
are neither indestructible nor immortal. This realization may have saved the life
of a coach at Iolani School.

 

Waianae High School (Oahu): This story explores how a family in West Oahu deals
with a very humbling experience: the onset of dementia in the family matriarch.

 

This episode is hosted by Aiea High School in Honolulu.

 

This program encores Saturday, Oct. 31 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, Nov. 1 at 3:00 pm.
You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAII

How Can Hawaii’s Special Education Services Boost Achievement for
Students with Disabilities?

Thurs., Oct. 29, 8:00 pm

New

 

We’re told that it takes 23% of the State Department of Education budget to serve
11% of the students – those in special education. Yet, critics say, special-ed
students are not gaining enough academic ground. Our question on the next
INSIGHTS: How can Hawaii’s special education services boost achievement for
students with disabilities?

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAII is a live public affairs show that is also streamed live
on PBSHawaii.org. Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email, or
Twitter. You may also email your questions ahead of time to insights@pbshawaii.org or
post them to our Facebook page www.facebook.com/PBSHawaii.

 

WASHINGTON WEEK WITH GWEN IFILL

Fri., Oct. 30, 7:30 pm

New

 

For 40 years, WASHINGTON WEEK has delivered one of the most interesting
conversations of the week. Hosted by Gwen Ifill, it is the longest-running
public affairs program on PBS and features a group of journalists participating
in roundtable discussion of major news events.

 

CHARLIE ROSE – THE WEEK

Fri., Oct. 30, 8:00 pm

New

 

This weekly series features the iconic TV anchor’s focus on the events and
conversations shaping this week and the week ahead. Drawing on conversations
from his nightly PBS program and new insightful perspectives from around the
world, it captures the defining moments in politics, science, business,
culture, media and sports.

 

THE MCLAUGHLIN GROUP

Fri., Oct. 30, 8:30 pm

New

 

THE MCLAUGHLIN GROUP is an unscripted forum featuring some of the greatest
political analysts in the nation.

 

SCIENCE & NATURE

 

NATURE

Pets: Wild at Heart: Secretive Creatures

Wed., Oct. 28, 8:00 pm

New

 

In a program packed with amazing filming techniques, from Schlieren
photography that makes smells visible, to moving X-rays, to ultra slow motion,
discover how our pets experience the world through their astonishing senses and
hidden communication. Learn about the sensory secrets of budgies, horses, guinea
pigs and goldfish as well as the remarkable abilities of hamsters, cats and dogs.

 

NOVA

Animal Mummies

Wed., Oct. 28, 9:00 pm

New

 

From baboons to bulls, crocodiles to cows, a vast menagerie of animal mummies
lies buried in Egyptian tombs. Hi-tech imaging reveals what’s inside the bundles
and the strange role that animals played in ancient Egyptian burial beliefs.

 

THE BRAIN WITH DAVID EAGLEMAN

Who is in Control?

Wed., Oct. 28, 10:00 pm

New

 

Neuroscientist David Eagleman explores the human brain in an epic series that
reveals the ultimate story of us – why we feel and think the things we do. This
ambitious series blends science with innovative visual effects and compelling
personal stories.

 

Who is in Control?
Dr. Eagleman explores the unconscious brain and reveals that everything from
our movements, to our decisions, to our behavior is largely controlled and
orchestrated by an invisible world of unconscious neural activity.

 

HISTORY

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE

War of the Worlds

Tues., Oct. 27, 8:00 pm

Encore

 

On Sunday, October 30, 1938, the night before Halloween, millions of Americans
gathered around their radios and heard a news bulletin about strange explosions
on Mars, followed by other reports that led them to believe an alien invasion
was in progress. Relive the thrill of Orson Welles’ infamous radio
dramatization of H.G. Wells’ War of the Worlds, 75 years after it set off one
of the biggest mass hysteria events in U.S. history. The film examines the
elements that made America ripe for the hoax: America’s longtime fascination
with life on Mars; the emergence of radio as a powerful new medium; the
shocking Hindenburg explosion of 1937; and Welles himself, the 23-year-old
wunderkind director of the drama and mischief-maker supreme.

 

SECRETS OF THE DEAD

Vampire Legend

Tues., Oct. 27, 9:00 pm

Fri., Oct. 30, 11:00 pm

New

 

Follow scientists as they uncover “deviant” burials dating back to medieval
England, pointing to a belief that the dead could rise from their graves.
Predating Eastern European legend, these discoveries force a re-examination
of modern vampire lore.

 

DIY

 

AMERICAN WOODSHOP

Recycled Trestle Table

Sat., Oct. 31, 2:00 pm

New

 

Host Scott Phillips guides us through the creations of many unique pieces, from
spice cabinets to decorative picture frames and mirrors to a plantation table –
all things you can make in your woodshop at home.

 

Recycled Trestle Table
Scott demonstrates pegged mortise and tenon joints.

 

ASK THIS OLD HOUSE

Sat., Oct. 31, 2:30 pm

New

 

Watch Richard and Kevin investigate mechanical rooms on their trip to Germany.
They explain why the country is a world leader in energy efficiency. Kevin
returns to the states to help Ross install a residential wind turbine in Texas.

 

THIS OLD HOUSE

It’s All About the Beams

Sat., Oct. 31, 3:00 pm

New

 

Tommy installs flitch beams in the kitchen. Kevin goes to West Virginia to see
how laminated veneer lumber is made. Landscape designer Jenn Nawada works on a
plan for the shade-covered backyard.

 

MARTHA BAKES

Bake It Dark

Sat., Oct. 31, 4:00 pm

New

 

Join Martha Stewart for culinary tricks of the trade to coax the utmost flavor
from your baked goods. Create sticky toffee pudding served with a toffee sauce,
mini apricot tarte tatins and no-knead bread with flavorful seeds.

 

COOK’S COUNTRY FROM AMERICA’S TEST KITCHEN

Southern Comfort

Sat., Oct. 31, 4:30 pm

New

 

Test cook Bridget Lancaster shows host Christopher Kimball how to make a regional
recipe, Delta hot tamales, at home. Test cook Julia Collin Davison reveals the
secrets to another regional specialty, Charleston shrimp perloo.

 

LIDIA’S KITCHEN

Grandma’s Favorites

Sat., Oct. 31, 5:00 pm

New

 

Chef Lidia Bastianich conjures simple, seasonal and economical dishes with
grace, confidence and love. She teaches viewers to draw on their roots, allow
for spontaneity and cultivate a sense of home in the kitchen. Filled with tips
and techniques collected through years in the kitchen and at the family table,
Lidia channels her passion for teaching into a fun and trustworthy curriculum
of kitchen wisdom.

 

Grandma’s Favorites
In this episode, Lidia honors the grandmothers of the family. She starts with
a delicious and quick skillet gratin of mushrooms and chicken. Joining her is
Lidia’s granddaughter, Julia, to taste Grandma Rosa’s apple cake.

 

SIMPLY MING

Jamie Bissonnette

Sat., Oct. 31, 5:30 pm

New

 

SIMPLY MING returns for another season of mouth-watering recipes, celebrity
appearances and culinary road trips. Each episode kicks off with a technique
demonstration, followed by two dishes — one prepared by a nationally renowned
guest chef and one by host Ming Tsai. This season focuses on comfort food —
from childhood classics to melting-pot dishes from around the world.

 

Jamie Bissonnette
Ming is cooking at home with James Beard award-winning chef, Jamie Bissonnette.
They take on rice, creating two amazing dishes from one simple ingredient.
Ming uses crispy chicken sausage and scallions to create a flavorful spin on
classic fried rice, while Jamie creates a savory paella from seasonal
ingredients.

 

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