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LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX
Allen Hoe

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX: Allen Hoe

 

As one of more than two million draftees called upon to fight in the Vietnam War, 19-year-old Allen Hoe thought he would serve his time and then his life would return to normal. He couldn’t have imagined that his 10-month combat tour would make him what others describe as a soldier’s soldier. The longtime Hawai‘i attorney reflects on the wartime experiences that forever shaped his civilian life.

 

Read the November program guide cover story on Allen Hoe

 

Preview

 

This program will be rebroadcast on Sunday, Nov. 18, at 4:00 pm and 11:30 pm.

 

More from Allen Hoe:

 

The Flag
 

 

Why Polo?

 

 

 

Allen Hoe
A Soldier’s Soldier by Emilie Howlett

ALLEN HOE: A Soldier's Story by Emilie Howlett

 

Leslie Wilcox talks story with Allen HoeAs one of more than two million draftees called upon to fight in the Vietnam War, 19-year-old Allen Hoe thought he would serve his time and then his life would resume as normal. In his conversation on Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox, Hoe reflects on the experiences that turned this local boy into a soldier’s soldier.

 

Trained as a combat medic with the Army, he witnessed some of life’s greatest horrors, and these intense circumstances helped forge a life-long bond with the men he served alongside. The politics and ethics of the controversial war and the reasoning behind what they were fighting to preserve came second to “simply thinking about saving the life of your buddy on your right and on your left” recalls Hoe.

 

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX, Tuesday, November 13, 7:30 pmOn Mother’s Day 1968, one of his greatest fears played out in front of him. While he hung back at headquarters waiting to rejoin the other men in his unit, they were overrun. Hoe lost 18 men from his unit, while several more were captured and held prisoner.

 

While many would seek to close the door on this tragic chapter of their lives, Hoe extended his kindness towards those who felt the loss most profoundly. “I am reflective on the mothers of my men who didn’t make it. And over the past fifty years … that bond I had with their sons, I’ve developed with [the mothers] … It’s always been an obligation to assure their mothers whose sons never came home that their sons are superb young men.”

 

“... my mission has been to try and make the lives and the comfort and the memory of soldiers who put on the uniform every day for us a little bit better.” – Allen Hoe

 

Allen Hoe and the courageous men he had served with.

 

Along with the atrocities he witnessed as a combat medic, the loss of the men he served alongside would follow him long after his tour ended. However, life went on. After returning to Hawai‘i, Hoe found success as an attorney, got married and had two sons.

 

But tragedy struck again. In 2005, his elder son, 27-year-old Army First Lieutenant Nainoa Hoe, was killed by a sniper’s bullet while leading a foot patrol in Northern Iraq. “How our family and how this community responded when our son was killed, it was very eye-opening. You know, having survived combat, having witnessed death, was totally different when that knock came on our door.”

 

While visiting the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. on Memorial Day of that same year, seeing the names etched on The Wall, including those of his own men, took on a new resonance. “Looking at all these names, you would think that the world would have come to a complete stop,” Hoe says.

 

Allen Hoe’s own losses inspired a lifelong commitment to healing the wounds of war by supporting those touched by its effects. In June 2018, he was presented with the Mana O Ke Koa award, which honors his unparalleled patronage and his dedication and service toward soldiers, civilians and the U.S. Army Pacific. Hoe has transformed the tragedy in his life into generosity, serving as a guiding light for so many. “So, my mission has been to try and make the lives and the comfort and the memory of soldiers who put on the uniform every day for us a little bit better.”

 

 

Oregon Revealed: Coastal Wonder

 

This travelogue highlights Oregon’s stunning landscapes and spectacular coastline stretching from the bridges of Astoria to the rolling dunes of Bandon. Featured on this dramatic aerial tour are cliffs, estuaries, ports and small towns, including Tillamook Bay, Cape Kiwanda, Coos Bay and more.

 

 

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX
They Did It Their Way

 

Long Story Short looks back on three previous guests who paved their own paths in life and followed their instincts, often against the grain of society’s expectations. Featured: Marion Higa, who spoke truth to power as Hawai‘i’s State Auditor; Kitty Lagareta (now Kitty Yannone), CEO of public relations firm Communications Pacific, whose career has been punctuated by a healthy dose of risk; and Kimi Werner, who gave up her success in competitive spearfishing to reconnect with the ocean in a more meaningful way as an environmental advocate.

 

This program will be rebroadcast on Sunday, May 6 at 4:00 pm and 11:30 pm.

 

They Did It Their Way Audio

 

They Did It Their Way Transcript

 

Transcript

 

MARION HIGA: At times, it felt almost personal.  But I didn’t take it that way, because it was my job.  And I always go back to the constitutional language; this is what the constitutional drafters expected of this office.  And as long as I’m doing that, then any governor can complain as much as they like.

 

KITTY YANNONE: I’ve had Democrats publicly won’t have anything to do with me. But late at night, when they need some advice, they call me, and they return my calls.  I’ve had media people.  I think when you’re a little more outspoken and they have a sense you’re authentic about it, they return your calls.  And you know what?  It never stopped me from doing what I do, with the utmost integrity and professionalism.

 

KIMI WERNER: All I just told myself is: I want diving to always give me that feeling that I had of bringing home those little fish, you know, on that first dive, and knowing in my heart that I was happy and proud of that, and that I felt satisfied with that.  And that’s the feeling that I wanted.  I didn’t quite know what type of path that would take me on, or how it would affect my career, but I just knew I wanted that back.

 

Marion Higa stood up to two governors to stop an auditing practice that she felt was inappropriate.  Kitty Yannone defied the local political system by supporting a Republican for governor.  And Kimi Werner was at the peak of her powers when she quit national spearfishing competitions.  They followed their instincts and their hearts, and they did it their way, next, on Long Story Short.

 

One-on-one engaging conversations with some of Hawai‘i’s most intriguing people: Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox.

 

Aloha mai kākou. I’m Leslie Wilcox.  Sometimes, it takes an enormous amount of courage to do what you know to be right, when others want you to do otherwise, when it would be much easier to simply to go with the flow.  On this episode of Long Story Short, we revisit three women who have previously been guests on this program.  Each followed her own path, respectively refusing to give in to political pressure, community disapproval, or turning away from a popular identity that did not reflect her core values.

 

We begin with Marion Higa.  For almost two decades, she was the Hawai‘i State Auditor, investigating the use of State resources and exposing inefficiencies. She as unflinching when agencies criticized her, knowing she had a job to do, and believing she was representing the best interests of the people of Hawai‘i.  One of the highest visibility audits she performed was on the Superferry. The State government wanted the Superferry to be up and running as soon as possible.  But the community was divided in its support for the ferry. The State Auditor was called in to analyze the administration’s environmental review.

 

The environmental groups had challenged the lack of the EIS early enough.  I think it wasn’t completed by the time they started sailing because you might remember that the first ship was delivered. And I think Superferry was trying to avoid the timetable, and so they had planned to start service to Nawiliwili, again, because they could do that most easily.  And people in Kaua‘i jumped in the water and kept them from docking, so they never docked.  They had to turn around and come back.  Now, in the course of all of this, then the State had put up forty-two million dollars’ worth of improvements.  But because of the way they designed or had to design these improvements, and the sourcing of these materials, it could not be used, because they were not U.S.-sourced. That was the other problem.

 

What did you hear from the administration about that?

 

Oh, they objected, of course, to our findings, and had their own responses. But I mean, we could support our findings.

 

What was your recommendation? 

 

I think our recommendation was … well, first of all, the EIS; I mean, there was no question that they had to follow the EIS.  But I think eventually, we softened the recommendation, because there was the other court case that was still proceeding and was going to the Supreme Court.  So, I think we predicted that nothing be hard and fast decided until that case was settled. Eventually, the court came down, one could say, on the side of the environmentalists, and required the EIS.

 

How did you feel about the stinging rebuke from the administration?

 

I didn’t take it personally.  I mean, I expected it, because there was so much at stake.  And I understood that even the legislators, some of the legislators who had been avid supporters would be disappointed, at best.

 

Especially since they had put through a bill that allowed … it seemed it was written for a particular company, but general language was used, except the timeframe was so short that it looked like it was written specifically for the Superferry.

 

Yes; it looked like special purpose legislation, which again, is not permitted by State law.

 

And so, that was people you worked for who were on the other end of criticism.

 

That’s right.  And so, you know, they’re party to that process.  But again, it’s like: Well, that’s my job, I have to say it the way it is.

 

Even if it’s your job, and you say you’re doing it on the straight and narrow, what’s it like riding that wave, where basically are taking shots at you as you take that position?

 

You know, like I said, it’s my job.  This is what the constitution was intended for us to do, and if we can defend the work.  And so, the process seems so laborious, and it’s so careful.  There’s a whole system; it’s all electronic now, the working papers are electronic.  But there’s a citation system involved in our work, so every fact can be traced back to a source document.  And so, working for the Auditor’s Office is not easy.  You have to be very meticulous, and be able to defend your work. But as long as the overall conclusions are supported by this mountain of evidence, it’s all defensible.

 

I always used to think it was so funny when you’d come walking into a legislative hearing room, hearing about an audit of the administration.  I mean, how tall are you?

 

Four-ten; barely four-ten, more like four-nine.

 

Four-ten; and it was as if a towering figure were coming in, this shadow was entering the room.  Did you get that feeling, that’s how people were reacting to you?

 

Sometimes; yes.  Uh-huh; uh-huh.

 

And you wouldn’t back down, either.

 

No, because that’s not my job.  My job is to support the report, because that stands for our work.

 

Any memorable exchanges between you and someone else?

 

A few times.  I guess I was at … Ways and Means once, and I had a minority member ask me … hunched over the table like this, he says: Ms. Higa … who do you work for?  Who do you work for?  Ms. Higa, who do you work for?  And I said: The people of Hawaii.  No; who do you really work for?  The people of Hawai‘i.  What he was trying to get me to say was, I work for the majority party.  And that’s not who I worked for.  I said: The constitution says I’m the auditor, I’m the State Auditor, I work for the people.  So, he gave up.

 

Kitty Yannone, formerly known as Kitty Lagareta, started her professional journey as a volunteer fundraiser for the Ronald McDonald House.  This eventually led to her present career as the CEO of a successful company offering integrated communication services.  Kitty Yannone is known for following her instincts.  She’s bucked public opinion, and risked her business.  One of her biggest risks was in ardently supporting a Republican candidate for governor.

 

I’d met Linda Lingle when she was mayor of Maui through some volunteer work with high school students that we’d gone over there to do, and I didn’t know her very well at all.  And she called one day and wanted to meet with me.  And my husband answered the phone, and he said: The mayor of Maui wants to talk to you.  I’m like: Why does she want to talk to me?  It was like, a Sunday.  I go: What does she want?  And he goes: Why don’t you talk to her and find out.  She asked if she could meet, and she was thinking about running for governor in a couple years.  This was maybe a year or two.  And so, I went and met with her.  I think I spent five hours asking her questions, and I knew nothing about politics. And she said: That’s okay, we’ll figure it out; it’s a big race, I need a communications person, I think you’re kind of a smart person.  And I’d volunteered on a couple political things, but nobody ever wanted to use that part of me they wanted me to stuff envelopes, which was fine, or do stuff which was happy to do, and it’s important stuff.  But I was kind of intrigued by having somebody want me to be involved in the strategic side.  So, I started helping her in ’98, and I immediately got calls from a lot of people around town, friends, parents of kids.  You know, if you’re gonna do politics at this time, it’s really kinda stupid to get involved with the party that has no power.  And I said: Yeah, but I like this candidate, and I really want to do this.  And I didn’t lose any clients; no clients said: I’m gonna quit.  They just, I think, were kind of bemused.  And Linda came within five thousand votes, and it was a huge learning and a wonderful experience for me, except for the losing part. But we all took it harder than she did. And before we had even let the dust settle, she was saying: We’re gonna do this again in 2002.  And I remember thinking: Eee, I don’t know.  But of course, I was onboard for 2002.

 

Had you suffered business-wise, advocating for her?

 

You never know what you don’t get.  I think once people realized she was a serious candidate, I certainly did, you know, I think.  And I tend to vote for people, and like people more than parties.  I don’t really feel connected to parties.  I’m sort of a fiscal conservative and a social liberal. And particularly during that time, it was like somebody had branded a big R on my forehead; she’s a Republican. And all that they equate with anybody of any political party is interesting.  And so, that was a new experience for me.

 

But you weren’t following the playbook of most public relations executives.  You were following your mind and, to some extent, your heart.

 

Yeah. You know, I believe in that, because I think a lot of executives, if they can, they do that.  And I just feel even when it’s a learning experience, having the experience makes me better overall.  And that was a learning experience.  And by gosh, in 2002, we pulled it off, and that was interesting. And I thought we were done.  That was the other thing, kind of still had naïveté, not having been in politics.  It was like: Okay, we’re done, I can go back to my life.  And I remember Linda called and she said: You know, I think you would be one of the people I want to recommend for Board of Regents.  And I remember saying: Oh, why that?  I mean, I don’t know.

 

Talk about political.

 

She had to talk me into it.

 

What you got into was a mire with the president of the University, Evan Dobelle.

 

Yeah.

 

And a very slippery situation.  And your expertise is public relations, but it was very hard to manage it. 

 

Yeah; and it’s hard to be in it and manage something.  I know that.  Therapists will tell you: I can’t do therapy in my own family.  When you’re one of the players in something, and everybody’s got their own opinion, you’re not the PR managing something then, I think.

 

And as the chair of the Board of Regents.

 

Yeah.

 

I mean, I think there was a perception at some time that you were bungling it.

 

Yeah; yeah.  I actually thought I was.  I knew it was bungled, but I also had the perspective of there was a whole bunch of stuff.  You know, it was an employee-employer relationship between the Board and Evan. And there are certain laws you have to follow, confidentiality and things.  So, we were not in a position to say: Hey, we tried this, we did this. And I think the employee can say whatever they want pretty much, really.  And you see that over and over.  So, that was a disadvantage, and it was hard.  The other part was, you know, you will never know the effort we made to do it carefully.  And the sense, I think, that was there was that, I have this contract, no way you’re gonna get me out of it, and I’m not going anywhere.  And as time went on, I think it became clear the University was suffering, and we had to do something.  And in fact, our creditors told us that.  And it felt very bungled.  It felt like there were lots of pieces that you couldn’t control.  It was horrible watching the public perception of it, and knowing there was another story, but you can’t be the one to tell it. You’re the employer.  That was really rugged, I think for all of us. And yet, I found the decision we made to be the right one.  I’ve never regretted that decision.  How it unfolded and what it looked like on the outside; yeah, there was a lot of regret about that, but not the decision.  And I don’t think any of us did.

 

So, the right outcome.

 

The right outcome; and it really was.  You know, that’s the decision.  I mean, there were regents who quit because they didn’t want to go down.  They knew what needed to be done, but they didn’t want to be in the middle of all that.  And there were some amazing people who stuck around and said: This needs to be done for the good of our university.  And I think there is some vindication in what happened at Westfield College.  It’s pretty much what happened here.  That’s taken a different more public turn, I think.  But came many years later, but it was there, and we did make the right decision. And under David McClain’s leadership, we went on to have some finished capital campaign, move a lot of things forward at the University.  And I look at it that way and say: Yeah, there was some personal pain, and I could have avoided it, but maybe it wouldn’t have been the right people in the room to make the decisions that I think were good ones if all of us had done that.  I’ve never found discomfort to be an inhibiting factor.  I used to give a speech after—this was when they were saying: Fear is your friend.  I use it as like, rocket fuel.  When I feel that, it tells me to turn on all my senses and look at something carefully. But sometimes, it really energizes you. And maybe that’s what I get from my mom and dad.  ‘Cause my mom and dad, in their own way, overcame a lot of stuff in their lives, built a really nice life for them and their family, and still do.  And they had certain values, and it didn’t include being afraid, or being uncomfortable, being something that pulls you up.  Yeah.

 

I’m sure you had some sleepless nights over the regents matter.

 

Many; I think I didn’t sleep for like a whole year.

 

And that was okay with you, ‘cause you felt like you were doing the right thing?

 

I felt like we were doing the right thing, and I felt like, you know, sometimes that’s what they call—that’s what I consider when I see people go through that, and I do with my clients sometimes, who are struggling with hard decisions and want to do the right decisions.  And I think I’m grateful I’ve had that experience a few times in my life, because I think that’s what you call political courage.  I call it that when I see it in other people.  And when you’re in it, it doesn’t feel like any kind of courage; it feels like a nightmare.  But in the end, if something good came out or a group of people were able to come together to make something happen that was right or needed to happen, or bigger than they could do on their own.

 

What if it fails?

 

Yeah; it does.  I failed in ’98.  Do you know how many people wouldn’t even talk to me after ’98?  She’s the one who went to the other side, you know.  I lived through it.  I don’t know; I feel like I have to live in this world and do things that I think are important.  I can’t always defer to, that might hurt my business, or that may not.  Then I’d just be kind of a shallow person, I feel.  You have gauge with life and with issues, and with people, and the world you live in.

 

Kimberly Maile Reiko Werner, known as Kimi, is a roving ambassador for the American Clothes Company Patagonia, as well as a trained chef and self-taught artist.  She grew up in rural Maui, tagging along on ocean dives with her father as he hunted for fish to feed the family.  Unsatisfied with her early career choices, she started thinking that maybe her childhood pastimes could still be part of her life.  She learned to spearfish, became an accomplished free diver, and a national spearfishing champion.  Yet, despite the success and recognition she was gaining through her awards, she realized that spearfishing competition wasn’t the right thing for her, either.

 

You know, my first tournament, that first national championships, that was really special.  And coming back home to Hawai‘i was just the best feeling in the world, because Hawaii is just the most supportive, loyal, wonderful hometown, I think, that anyone could ever ask for, in my opinion.  And the way that people supported me was something that I just was so grateful for.  But I think after that, it was never quite the same, because I almost just felt like I just always had a title to defend.  I did continue to win in competing, but it was just never as fulfilling to me.  And I noticed that even when I would go diving, you know, on my own just for food, all I was thinking about was competition, and you know, I started to think of fish as points, rather than even as food.  And once I realized that, I didn’t like it.  I just realized it’s changing me.  You know, it’s changing this thing that’s so sacred to me.  It’s something that my parents, you know, taught me these values through this.  And it’s not about these values anymore; it’s really about trophies and winning, and recognition.  And this was the thing that really made my life fulfilling again.  Am I really gonna do this to it?  Am I gonna take it to a level where it’s all about, you know, chasing titles?  Like, I didn’t like that.  And so, just for those own personal reasons of how I found it affecting me, I did walk away from competition.

 

I saw you do a TEDx talk, and you said that even though you knew it was the right thing to do, it didn’t mean that other people weren’t very disappointed in you, and that you felt really bad about it, too.

 

Oh, definitely.  I mean, it was one of the toughest things I’ve done, because it was right in the peak of what could have been my career.  You know, I had sponsors now, and you know, people that believed in me, people that looked up to me.  And all of a sudden, I was just gonna walk away from it.  And it let down a lot of people, and definitely disappointed people. And for myself too, I mean, I did feel a sense of, you know, confusion, because I felt so lost.  I didn’t really know who I was without that.  It had become so the tunnel vision of my life, and pretty much, you know, everything that was confident-building seemed to come from that department.  It was the first time where, you know, my art started to sell more, because my name was out there more.  And it just seemed like it was something that was causing so much personal gain that for me to turn and walk away from it, I definitely felt like a loser.  You know, I felt like a waste of talent, and I felt like I didn’t quite know if I would like … you know.  I didn’t know the effects it was gonna have.  I didn’t know how much it would bum people out, or if I would just never be really supported again, really.

 

What happened, then?

 

It took me a while, actually.  It was probably a year where a lot of times I would go out diving, and all of a sudden, it wasn’t the same happy place it used to be.  You know, when I say I’m totally present in the moment, and those voices in my head go quiet, it wasn’t happening; these voices were just telling me that I was a loser, and I was failure, and you know, what are you doing, like why are you quitting.  And it was still, you know, looking at the fish as points, and so then, I’d have to get out of the water with no fish.  And then, I really would beat myself up.  Like, I’m not even good at this anymore, I can’t even dive ‘cause my mind’s all messed up.  And I got pretty depressed.  But through that, you know, I just kinda took some breaks from diving and whatnot. And then this one day, couple friends of mine like said: You need to get back in the water.  Like, let’s go.  And so, we all went out on our kayaks, and again, my brain was just still fighting itself, and I just felt like I wasn’t diving the I way I dive; I didn’t have it anymore.  And so, I’m like: Let’s just pack it up and go, guys.  I know what you’re trying to do, and I know you’re trying to bring me back, but it’s just not fun for me anymore, and there’s nothing worse than the feeling of actually being out here and it not being fun anymore, so I just want to go home.  And they said: Okay, let’s go.  But then, I said: You know what, let me just take one last drop.  And I put my spear gun on my kayak, didn’t even take it down with me, and I just took a dive.  And I had my two buddies, you know, spotting me from the surface, so it was safe.  But I just took a dive, and just told them to watch me, you know, took a dive.  And I got down to the bottom, and I just laid in the sand.  I just crossed my arms and I put my face in the sand.  And I laid there, and I let every single critic come through my head, every single voice, every single thing that I had beat myself up about, like, I just let it come.  And I listened to every single put-down, worry, concern, fear.  And they all came, one after another, and I just waited, and I just still waited, held my breath.  Okay, what else you got; give it to me.  You know, I just waited, and waited, and waited until there was nothing left.  And when there was nothing left, there was not one more voice that could say anything, you know, hadn’t already heard.  Like, it just went quiet.  And as soon as it went quiet, I opened my eyes and I’m on the bottom of the ocean, and I was just back.  I think the competition, and just more than that even, just the expectations that I was putting on myself.  And I think that can happen a lot with anybody who tries to turn their passion into a career; it can get quite confusing.  I think a lot of times, we go into jobs because we’re so passionate about our craft, and then before we know it, you know, we’re not really enjoying it anymore, and we’re going through the motions because we’re trying to hit these certain marks of society, whether it’s financial success, or I need that house, or I need that car, and before you know it, your own beautiful passion that kinda becomes this vehicle for living unauthentically, and doing things based on expectations that were never really yours to begin with, maybe. Because before, to me, it was never truly about like, oh, that moment when you spear your fish.  But it was the feeling that I felt when I would take a drop, and just the serenity that would come over me, and just this feeling of welcome home.  And when everything just turned quiet, and I was still there holding my breath, and I looked up and I just saw my two friends, and I saw the sun just sparkling through the ocean surface, and I just looked at the beautiful ocean and hear the noise, you know, the sounds of the ocean, and that was it.  I was like, that’s the feeling; that’s the feeling that satisfies me.  And soon as I came up, I didn’t even have to say anything; they knew.  They knew exactly what had happened, they knew exactly. And I smiled at them, and they were just like: You’re back.  And I’m like: I’m back.  And that was that.  And after that, then I just started diving for food again, and just realizing like that’s something sacred to me, and I’m going to protect it with everything that I have.  I’m gonna do everything I can to keep this pure.  Even if it means no success comes from this, this is mine.

 

Kimi Werner, Kitty Yannone, and Marion Higa followed their instincts and listened to their own voices to do it their way. Mahalo to these three women of Hawai‘i for sharing their stories with us.  And mahalo to you, for joining us.  For PBS Hawaii and Long Story Short, I’m Leslie Wilcox.  Aloha nui.

 

For audio and written transcripts of all episodes of Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox, visit PBSHawaii.org.  To download free podcasts of Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox, go to the Apple iTunes Store or visit PBSHawaii.org.

 

I still get approached by people, total strangers.  You know, I mean, it’s always complimentary.  I know it’s a curiosity.  I mean, I go into restaurants, and I know people recognize me. You can tell when you’re recognized.

 

And so, do they say: What did you really think?

 

Sometimes, people will say that.  But most of the time, people will come up and thank me for the work that we did.  So, I’d like to think that there were some good effects, for some folks, anyway.

 

Things that I have done that were much harder learning experiences than I anticipated. Ronald McDonald House was that way at times, and certainly Board of Regents, and getting involved politically. There are things in my company I don’t have a business background, and I’ve had to learn through trial and error, experience.  I wish I’d known more, but I came out the other side knowing it now, and I don’t regret much of anything.  I think, you know, I’ve had sad things and hard things, and it’s life.  And you know, as long as I keep getting up and experiencing it, I’m kinda happy.

 

I think by following that passion and really making the commitment to be true to my love for it, surprisingly, it did bring success, and just in so much more of a meaningful way.  Because now, it wasn’t just any sponsors that I was working with; it was sponsors and companies like Patagonia who truly hold the same values as me, who aren’t just, you know, trying to sell an image or, do what’s trendy, but really, really believe in trying to make this world better, trying to give back to these beautiful natural elements of our world.

 

 

 

RICK STEVES’ EUROPE
Assisi and Italian Country Charm

 

Join writer and host Rick Steves as he experiences the local culture, cuisine and fun in some of Europe’s most interesting places.

 

Assisi and Italian Country Charm
In the Italian countryside, Rick watches prosciutto and pecorino cheese being made. In Assisi – the hometown of St. Francis – he explores its stony center before trekking to its awe-inspiring basilica, built on the tomb of the beloved saint.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
The Right of Access

 

More than 50 years ago, under Chief Justice William S. Richardson, the Supreme Court of the State of Hawai‘i ruled the public had the right to access all beaches throughout our State. But for decades there have been disputes — clashes throughout the islands — involving access pathways that lead to our beaches.

 

What do you think? Is is time we settled this “right of access” dispute linked to one of the most historically significant rulings in our history?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 


Korla

 

Korla is the amazing story of John Roland Redd, an African American from Columbia, Missouri who migrated to Hollywood in 1939 and reinvented himself as a musician from India. As one of early television’s pioneering musical artists, Korla Pandit’s life was one of talent, determination, ingenuity and racial passing, a story not fully realized until after his death in 1998.

 

PROGRAM LISTINGS
Oct. 25 – 31, 2015

 

Arts, Drama, Culture

 

THE GREAT BRITISH BAKING SHOW

Pastry

Sun., Oct. 25, 1:00 pm

New

 

Follow the trials and tribulations of 13 passionate amateur bakers whose goal
is to be named the U.K.’s best amateur baker. Each week, the bakers tackle a
different skill, the difficulty of which increases as the competition unfolds.
Hosts Mel Giedroyc and Sue Perkins coax them through their Signature, Technical
and Showstopper challenges, under the scrutiny of judges Mary Berry and Paul
Hollywood. After 10 weeks of whisking, crimping and piping, only one can
emerge victorious.

 

Pastry
The remaining six bakers are challenged to update old- fashioned suet puddings;
create perfect religieuses – delicate choux buns filled with
creme patissiere; and make three different kinds of puffed pastries.

 

HOME FIRES ON MASTERPIECE

Part 4 of 6

Sun., Oct. 25, 7:00 pm

New

 

Witness the bitter rivalry between Frances Barden (Samantha Bond of Downton
Abbey
fame) and Joyce Cameron (Francesca Annis) to control the Women’s
Institute in a rural English town as it struggles with the onset of World War II.

 

Part 4 of 6
Frances plans an air raid shelter. Alison breaks the law; so does Miriam. Steph
hides a secret that threatens the farm. Kate gets shattering news.

 

INDIAN SUMMERS ON MASTERPIECE

Part 5 of 9

Sun., Oct. 25, 8:00 pm

New

 

Julie Walters stars as the glamorous doyenne of an English social club in
the twilight era of British rule in India. Set in a subtropical paradise, the
series dramatizes the collision of the high-living English ruling class with
the local people agitating for Indian independence. As the drama unfolds, the
two sides alternately clash and merge in an intricate game of power, politics
and passion. Also starring in the lavish production are Henry Lloyd-Hughes,
Jemima West, Nikesh Patel, Roshan Seth and Lillete Dubey.

 

Part 5 of 9
Ralph plays politics at his engagement bash. Eugene tells Cynthia a shocking
secret. Adam and his mother make a surprise visit.

 

THE GUILTY

Part 1 of 3

Sun., Oct. 25, 9:00 pm

New

 

Follow DCI Maggie Brand (Tamsin Greig) as she leads a new investigation into
the five-year-old case of a boy’s disappearance during a neighborhood cookout.
Driven by her obsession to discover what happened, she risks her own happy
family life.

 

Part 1 of 3
DCI Brand, under pressure to charge her prime suspect, is still unconvinced
they’ve found the killer. As she begins to piece together the child’s final
hours, she finds her instinct as a mother at war with her desire to solve
the crime.

 

GREAT FIRE

Part 2 of 4

Sun., Oct. 25, 10:00 pm

New

 

Watch an epic drama about the 1666 Great Fire of London, when the city burned
for four days. Andrew Buchan stars as Thomas Farriner, whose bakery in Pudding
Lane was the flashpoint for the inferno. Also starring Charles Dance and
Jack Huston.

 

Part 2 of 4
Thomas flees the burning city with his family. Shocked at the speed of the
inferno’s spread, Pepys calls on the king to address the mayor’s failing efforts.
Thomas’ sister-in-law, Sarah, is imprisoned in Newgate as her son searches for her.

 

NA MELE

Na Palapalai

Mon., Oct. 26, 7:30 pm

Encore

 

Na Hoku Hanohano Award-winning high energy trio Na Palapalai brings their falsetto
style of Hawaiian music to the PBS Hawaii Studios in this special encore
presentation.

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW

Tulsa, OK, Part 1 of 3

Mon., Oct. 26, 8:00 pm

Encore

 

Host Mark L. Walberg and appraiser Nicholas Lowry head to the Pawnee Bill Ranch
to look at some show-stopping Wild West posters. Highlights include a poignant
signed note from Mother Teresa to a wood-carver who sent her a walking cane
during her final years, and a custom model 1894 Winchester rifle that may have
been used in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show.

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW

Chicago, IL, Part 2 of 3

Mon., Oct. 26, 9:00 pm

New

 

Discover an eclectic array of discoveries in Chicago, such as 1989 Keith Haring
graffiti art, a 1910 Walter Johnson All-Star watch, and a Walt Whitman Civil War
letter. Also: take a field trip to the Chicago Civic Opera.

 

I’LL HAVE WHAT PHIL’S HAVING

Barcelona

Mon., Oct. 26, 10:00 pm

New

 

Journey with Phil Rosenthal, creator of the TV series Everybody Loves
Raymond
, as he learns from chefs, vendors, culinary leaders and style-setters.
Rosenthal visits the kitchens on and off the well-worn gastronomic path that
keep traditions alive and create new ones.

 

Barcelona
Venture with Phil on a tapas crawl and even a vermouth bar. He’s also in
for a lesson on jamon, Spain’s most prized culinary export.

 

JAPANESE AMERICAN LIVES

Stories from Tohuku

Mon., Oct. 26, 11:00 pm

Encore

 

After the devastating 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami in Japan, survivors are
still struggling to rebuild. The Japanese American community has continued to
raise money and organize aid trips to the region. This powerful documentary
explores both the endurance and frustration of the survivors and the hope
inspired by the visitors.

 

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX

Karen Radius

Tues., Oct. 27, 7:30 pm

New

 

Growing up in Chicago, Karen Radius learned values from her working class
parents, neither of whom attended high school. After passing the bar exam in
Hawaii, Radius’ first job was with Legal Aid, serving some of the poorest people
in Hawaii. As a Family Court judge, Karen Radius learned that juvenile girls who
haven’t succeeded on regular probation needed a different type of juvenile
justice system. So she created Girls Court. “Girls Court is all about…working
on the relationships…within the family,” Radius explains. “(it’s) not just,
‘Did you comply with the court’s order and what the court told you to do’ … but
let’s figure out your life and let’s come up with a life’s plan for you.”

 

This program will be rebroadcast on Wednesday, Oct. 28 at 11:00 pm and
Sunday, Nov. 1 at 4:00 pm.

 

A Few Good Pie Places

Tues., Oct. 27, 11:00 pm

Encore

 

Come along on a tour of fruity and creamy pie shops from New York to Montana.
Meet the bakers who know how to make dough, add spices to fillings and crisscross
a lattice top. Classic apple pies abound, but there is also cherry, blueberry,
fluffy coconut cream, cherry lattice and sweet potato.

 

A CHEF’S LIFE

Eggs A Dozen Ways

Wed., Oct. 28, 7:30 pm

New

 

A Chef’s Life is a cooking and documentary series that takes viewers inside the
life of Chef Vivian Howard, who, with her husband Ben Knight, opens a fine dining
restaurant in her small hometown in Eastern North Carolina. Each episode follows
Vivian out of the kitchen and into cornfields, strawberry patches and hog farms
as she hunts down the ingredients that inspire her menus. Using a chef’s modern
sensibilities, Vivian explores Southern cuisine, past and present – one ingredient
at a time. A celebration of true farm-to-table food, the series combines the action
and drama of a high-pressure business with the joys and stresses of family life.

 

Eggs A Dozen Ways
Vivian finally makes good on a promise to cook for a friend’s supper club, and she
seizes the moment to experiment with an egg dish that she hopes will wow New
York City’s James Beard House crowd. She visits with her egg producer and
learns the ins and outs of egg varieties, from chickens to ducks to guineas to
partridges. She takes us through how to boil an egg and shares Miss Scarlett’s
secrets for a southern party staple: the perfect deviled egg.

 

PBS HAWAII PRESENTS

Keola Beamer: Mālama Ko Aloha (Keep Your Love)

Thurs., Oct. 29, 9:00 pm

Encore

 

This program tells the story of Keola Beamer’s journey through song. The respected
composer and slack key guitarist partners with an array of musicians, including
Native American flutist R. Carlos Nakai, American jazz pianist Geoffrey Keezer
and Hawaiian vocalist Raiatea Helm. These collaborations demonstrate how one
can retain cultural identity while openly sharing with others to create
something new – a global art form. This multicultural exchange reaches its
zenith when Beamer performs a Hawaiian-language version of John Lennon’s
“Imagine,” with musicians playing traditional Hawaiian, Chinese,
Japanese, Australian, Classical European and American Jazz instruments. In
another particularly moving segment, Keola accompanies his wife Moanalani
Beamer as she performs a hula as a quadriplegic woman who magically regains use
of her limbs in a dream.

 

GLOBE TREKKER

Papua New Guinea Islands

Thurs., Oct. 29, 10:00 pm

Encore

 

The trekkers explore New Britain Island, the largest in the Bismarck Archipelago
of Papua New Guinea. Inhabited by the indigenous Papuans and the Austronesians,
the island was captured by the Japanese during World War II. Today the island’s
traditional cultures are diverse and complex but there are several ancient
traditions which remain active today. Next, we visit the township of Rabaul,
once the provincial capital until it was destroyed in 1994 by a massive
volcanic eruption.

 

WELL READ

David McCullough, The Wright Brothers

Thurs., Oct. 29, 11:00 pm

New

 

This series features lively, engaging conversations about ideas in literature.
Host Terry Tazioli introduces the latest books — both fiction and non-fiction
— and interviews noted authors about the themes in their latest works. Following
each interview, Seattle Times book editor Mary Ann Gwinn joins Tazioli to further
explore the literary themes of the week’s book and to recommend related authors
and other reading material.

 

David McCullough: The Wright Brothers
David McCullough has received two Pulitzer Prizes for his past work. In his new
book, The Wright Brothers, he shares the story of the bond, work ethic and
dedication the Wright Brothers had to push their invention to new heights.

 

LIVE FROM LINCOLN CENTER

Danny Elfman’s Music from the Films of Tim Burton

Fri., Oct. 30, 9:00 pm

New

 

Composer and performer Danny Elfman descends on Lincoln Center with a symphony
orchestra and choir, led by conductor John Mauceri, as well as a colorful
assortment of Tim Burton fans. The evening includes performances of Elfman’s most
beloved scores from films in collaboration with Tim Burton such as Batman,
Beetlejuice, Edward Scissorhands and The Nightmare Before
Christmas
. Accompanying the music are film clips and original sketches and
storyboards created by Tim Burton.

 

A CRAFTSMAN’S LEGACY

The Metal Engraver

Sat., Oct. 31, 1:00 pm

New

 

Host Eric Gorges goes on a quest to discover the true craftsmen in today’s world.
Traveling across the country, Gorges interviews the men and women responsible
for carrying the tools, trades and traditions of fine craftsmanship into the
21st century. Gorges, a welder by trade, meets and interviews master craftsmen,
and learns why they chose their craft, where they learned their skills, how
they live using their talents and the challenges and importance of keeping
those traditions alive in a modern-day world.

 

The Metal Engraver
Eric meets metal engraver David Riccardo, who creates art with intricate
flourishes and filigree.

 

THE MIND OF A CHEF

Evolution

Sat., Oct. 31, 7:00 pm

New

 

Ever since 1999, when Chef Gabrielle Hamilton put canned sardines and Triscuits
on the first menu of her tiny, 30-seat East Village restaurant, Prune, she has
nonchalantly broken countless rules of the food world. Prune has always been an
idiosyncratic restaurant, with no culinary mission other than to serve what
Hamilton likes to eat in an environment in which she wants to eat. Hamilton won
the James Beard Foundation’s Best Chef NYC in 2011 and is author of a
best-selling memoir, Blood, Bones and Butter, which garnered a James
Beard Award for Writing and Literature in 2012.

 

Evolution
Venture into the unknown with Chef Gabrielle as she explores what’s next for her
career and the challenges associated with making the decision to step away from
life in the kitchen. Legendary chef Jacques Pepin demonstrates techniques and
Chef Mario Batali offers advice.

 

JOSEPH ROSENDO’S TRAVELSCOPE

Ontario’s Central Counties: Multi-Cultural Adventures

Sat., Oct. 31, 7:30 pm

New

 

Ontario’s Central Counties offers a mosaic of historic gristmill villages, verdant
farmlands and towns that thrive because of their multi-cultural population.
During his Central Counties explorations Joseph cycles through the rich Durham
farmlands on an agri-tourism adventure that includes fruit wine tasting and a
visit to Tyrone Mill, one of only two operating mills in Ontario. In the York
region he steps back in time at the Black Creek Pioneer Village for a taste of
what life was like in the early days of Canada and fast forwards into the
present at the Taste of Asia Festival in Markham.

 

50 Years with Peter, Paul and Mary

Sat., Oct. 31, 8:00 pm

Encore

 

Celebrate the impact of the trio that provided America’s soundtrack for
generations and combined artistry with activism for five decades. This program
features rare and previously unseen television footage, including a BBC program
from the early 1960s that embodies many of the trio’s best performances and most
popular songs. This is Peter, Paul and Mary at the peak of their artistry, a time
when this popular and influential trio dominated the Billboard music charts.

 

From the group’s emergence in Greenwich Village, to the Civil Rights and anti-war
era of the 1960s, through the decades of their later advocacy and music, to
Mary Travers’ moving memorial, and finally to the present, where their legacy
continues to inform and inspire successive generations, this far deeper and
more intimate exploration of the trio reveals the impact of their artistry and
activism on their generation and the world. Songs include: “Five Hundred
Miles,” “The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face,” “Puff, the Magic Dragon,” “If I
Had a Hammer (The Hammer Song),” “Blowin’ in the Wind” and “The Times They Are
a-Changin’.”

 

Red Rock Serenade

Sat., Oct. 31, 10:00 pm

Encore

 

Take a meditative, cinematic journey through the breathtaking scenery of the
American West’s iconic red rock country, including Arches, Bryce Canyon, Zion,
Canyonlands, Capitol Reef and Grand Canyon National Parks – all set to music by
some of the world’s greatest classical composers, including Bach, Brahms,
Chopin and Beethoven.

 

AUSTIN CITY LIMITS

Don Henley

Sat., Oct. 31, 11:00 pm

New

 

Savor songs from Don Henley’s first solo album in 15 years, Cass County.

 

Public Affairs

 

THE OPEN MIND

Sun., Oct. 25, 6:00 pm

New

 

Hosted by Alexander Heffner, this weekly public affairs program is a thoughtful
excursion into the world of ideas, exploring issues of national and public concern
with the most compelling minds of our times.

 

FRONTLINE

Inside Assad’s Syria

Tues., Oct. 27, 10:00 pm

New

 

Correspondent Martin Smith reports from government-controlled areas in Syria while
the war rages. With on-the-ground reporting and firsthand accounts from Syrians
caught in the crisis, the film shines new light on the ongoing conflict.

 

HIKI NŌ

Thurs., Oct. 29, 7:30 pm

New

 

This episode is the third in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses
on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is ha’aha’a, which
means humbleness and humility. Each of the following stories reflects this theme:

 

The top story comes from the students at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on
Kauai. They feature a Kauai resident named Moses Hamilton who learned
humbleness and humility when he had to start all over again after a tragic car
accident that left him a quadraplegic. While undergoing re-hab, Moses took up
mouth painting (painting by holding and manipulating the paint brush in one’s
mouth), and is a now a successful artist who sells his paintings at a shopping
mall in Hanalei, Kauai.

 

Also featured are student-created stories from the following schools:

 

Ka Waihona o Ka Naauao (Oahu): Uncle George, a native Hawaiian stand-up paddle
board instructor in West Oahu, exemplifies humbleness by giving away something
of great value – paddle board lessons – for free.

 

Roosevelt High School (Oahu): A Roosevelt High School student uses his experience
growing up in poverty-stricken countries to instill a sense of humility in his
fellow students.

 

Lahaina Intermediate School (Maui): A retiree-turned-elementary-school crossing
guard proves that a humbleness of spirit comes in handy when dedicating your life
to the safety of young children in your community.

 

Mililani Middle School (Oahu): After years in the spotlight as star quarterback
for the UH football team, Garrett Gabriel choses the much more humble profession
of counseling.

 

Iolani School (Oahu): The value of ha’aha’a, or humbleness, teaches us that we
are neither indestructible nor immortal. This realization may have saved the life
of a coach at Iolani School.

 

Waianae High School (Oahu): This story explores how a family in West Oahu deals
with a very humbling experience: the onset of dementia in the family matriarch.

 

This episode is hosted by Aiea High School in Honolulu.

 

This program encores Saturday, Oct. 31 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, Nov. 1 at 3:00 pm.
You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAII

How Can Hawaii’s Special Education Services Boost Achievement for
Students with Disabilities?

Thurs., Oct. 29, 8:00 pm

New

 

We’re told that it takes 23% of the State Department of Education budget to serve
11% of the students – those in special education. Yet, critics say, special-ed
students are not gaining enough academic ground. Our question on the next
INSIGHTS: How can Hawaii’s special education services boost achievement for
students with disabilities?

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAII is a live public affairs show that is also streamed live
on PBSHawaii.org. Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email, or
Twitter. You may also email your questions ahead of time to insights@pbshawaii.org or
post them to our Facebook page www.facebook.com/PBSHawaii.

 

WASHINGTON WEEK WITH GWEN IFILL

Fri., Oct. 30, 7:30 pm

New

 

For 40 years, WASHINGTON WEEK has delivered one of the most interesting
conversations of the week. Hosted by Gwen Ifill, it is the longest-running
public affairs program on PBS and features a group of journalists participating
in roundtable discussion of major news events.

 

CHARLIE ROSE – THE WEEK

Fri., Oct. 30, 8:00 pm

New

 

This weekly series features the iconic TV anchor’s focus on the events and
conversations shaping this week and the week ahead. Drawing on conversations
from his nightly PBS program and new insightful perspectives from around the
world, it captures the defining moments in politics, science, business,
culture, media and sports.

 

THE MCLAUGHLIN GROUP

Fri., Oct. 30, 8:30 pm

New

 

THE MCLAUGHLIN GROUP is an unscripted forum featuring some of the greatest
political analysts in the nation.

 

SCIENCE & NATURE

 

NATURE

Pets: Wild at Heart: Secretive Creatures

Wed., Oct. 28, 8:00 pm

New

 

In a program packed with amazing filming techniques, from Schlieren
photography that makes smells visible, to moving X-rays, to ultra slow motion,
discover how our pets experience the world through their astonishing senses and
hidden communication. Learn about the sensory secrets of budgies, horses, guinea
pigs and goldfish as well as the remarkable abilities of hamsters, cats and dogs.

 

NOVA

Animal Mummies

Wed., Oct. 28, 9:00 pm

New

 

From baboons to bulls, crocodiles to cows, a vast menagerie of animal mummies
lies buried in Egyptian tombs. Hi-tech imaging reveals what’s inside the bundles
and the strange role that animals played in ancient Egyptian burial beliefs.

 

THE BRAIN WITH DAVID EAGLEMAN

Who is in Control?

Wed., Oct. 28, 10:00 pm

New

 

Neuroscientist David Eagleman explores the human brain in an epic series that
reveals the ultimate story of us – why we feel and think the things we do. This
ambitious series blends science with innovative visual effects and compelling
personal stories.

 

Who is in Control?
Dr. Eagleman explores the unconscious brain and reveals that everything from
our movements, to our decisions, to our behavior is largely controlled and
orchestrated by an invisible world of unconscious neural activity.

 

HISTORY

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE

War of the Worlds

Tues., Oct. 27, 8:00 pm

Encore

 

On Sunday, October 30, 1938, the night before Halloween, millions of Americans
gathered around their radios and heard a news bulletin about strange explosions
on Mars, followed by other reports that led them to believe an alien invasion
was in progress. Relive the thrill of Orson Welles’ infamous radio
dramatization of H.G. Wells’ War of the Worlds, 75 years after it set off one
of the biggest mass hysteria events in U.S. history. The film examines the
elements that made America ripe for the hoax: America’s longtime fascination
with life on Mars; the emergence of radio as a powerful new medium; the
shocking Hindenburg explosion of 1937; and Welles himself, the 23-year-old
wunderkind director of the drama and mischief-maker supreme.

 

SECRETS OF THE DEAD

Vampire Legend

Tues., Oct. 27, 9:00 pm

Fri., Oct. 30, 11:00 pm

New

 

Follow scientists as they uncover “deviant” burials dating back to medieval
England, pointing to a belief that the dead could rise from their graves.
Predating Eastern European legend, these discoveries force a re-examination
of modern vampire lore.

 

DIY

 

AMERICAN WOODSHOP

Recycled Trestle Table

Sat., Oct. 31, 2:00 pm

New

 

Host Scott Phillips guides us through the creations of many unique pieces, from
spice cabinets to decorative picture frames and mirrors to a plantation table –
all things you can make in your woodshop at home.

 

Recycled Trestle Table
Scott demonstrates pegged mortise and tenon joints.

 

ASK THIS OLD HOUSE

Sat., Oct. 31, 2:30 pm

New

 

Watch Richard and Kevin investigate mechanical rooms on their trip to Germany.
They explain why the country is a world leader in energy efficiency. Kevin
returns to the states to help Ross install a residential wind turbine in Texas.

 

THIS OLD HOUSE

It’s All About the Beams

Sat., Oct. 31, 3:00 pm

New

 

Tommy installs flitch beams in the kitchen. Kevin goes to West Virginia to see
how laminated veneer lumber is made. Landscape designer Jenn Nawada works on a
plan for the shade-covered backyard.

 

MARTHA BAKES

Bake It Dark

Sat., Oct. 31, 4:00 pm

New

 

Join Martha Stewart for culinary tricks of the trade to coax the utmost flavor
from your baked goods. Create sticky toffee pudding served with a toffee sauce,
mini apricot tarte tatins and no-knead bread with flavorful seeds.

 

COOK’S COUNTRY FROM AMERICA’S TEST KITCHEN

Southern Comfort

Sat., Oct. 31, 4:30 pm

New

 

Test cook Bridget Lancaster shows host Christopher Kimball how to make a regional
recipe, Delta hot tamales, at home. Test cook Julia Collin Davison reveals the
secrets to another regional specialty, Charleston shrimp perloo.

 

LIDIA’S KITCHEN

Grandma’s Favorites

Sat., Oct. 31, 5:00 pm

New

 

Chef Lidia Bastianich conjures simple, seasonal and economical dishes with
grace, confidence and love. She teaches viewers to draw on their roots, allow
for spontaneity and cultivate a sense of home in the kitchen. Filled with tips
and techniques collected through years in the kitchen and at the family table,
Lidia channels her passion for teaching into a fun and trustworthy curriculum
of kitchen wisdom.

 

Grandma’s Favorites
In this episode, Lidia honors the grandmothers of the family. She starts with
a delicious and quick skillet gratin of mushrooms and chicken. Joining her is
Lidia’s granddaughter, Julia, to taste Grandma Rosa’s apple cake.

 

SIMPLY MING

Jamie Bissonnette

Sat., Oct. 31, 5:30 pm

New

 

SIMPLY MING returns for another season of mouth-watering recipes, celebrity
appearances and culinary road trips. Each episode kicks off with a technique
demonstration, followed by two dishes — one prepared by a nationally renowned
guest chef and one by host Ming Tsai. This season focuses on comfort food —
from childhood classics to melting-pot dishes from around the world.

 

Jamie Bissonnette
Ming is cooking at home with James Beard award-winning chef, Jamie Bissonnette.
They take on rice, creating two amazing dishes from one simple ingredient.
Ming uses crispy chicken sausage and scallions to create a flavorful spin on
classic fried rice, while Jamie creates a savory paella from seasonal
ingredients.

 

PROGRAM LISTINGS
Oct. 18 – 24, 2015

 

Arts, Drama, Culture

 

THE GREAT BRITISH BAKING SHOW

Sweet Dough

Sun., Oct. 18, 1:00 pm

New

 

Follow the trials and tribulations of 13 passionate amateur bakers whose goal
is to be named the U.K.’s best amateur baker. Each week, the bakers tackle a
different skill, the difficulty of which increases as the competition unfolds.
Hosts Mel Giedroyc and Sue Perkins coax them through their Signature, Technical
and Showstopper challenges, under the scrutiny of judges Mary Berry and Paul
Hollywood. After 10 weeks of whisking, crimping and piping, only one can
emerge victorious.

 

Sweet Dough
Watch the bakers work with sweet dough, from Swedish cinnamon buns to German
schnecken and French brioches. They also face Paul’s most
twisted Technical challenge yet.

 

HOME FIRES ON MASTERPIECE

Part 3 of 6

Sun., Oct. 18, 7:00 pm

New

 

Witness the bitter rivalry between Frances Barden (Samantha Bond of
Downton Abbey fame) and Joyce Cameron (Francesca Annis) to control
the Women’s Institute in a rural English town as it struggles with the onset
of World War II.

 

Part 3 of 6
Alison takes desperate steps to pay a bill. Claire asks Spencer out. Pat
makes a speech but pays the consequences. The farmer and vicar do their duty.

 

INDIAN SUMMERS ON MASTERPIECE

Part 4 of 9

Sun., Oct. 18, 8:00 pm

New

 

Julie Walters stars as the glamorous doyenne of an English social club in the
twilight era of British rule in India. Set in a subtropical paradise, the
series dramatizes the collision of the high-living English ruling class with
the local people agitating for Indian independence. As the drama unfolds, the
two sides alternately clash and merge in an intricate game of power, politics
and passion. Also starring in the lavish production are Henry Lloyd-Hughes,
Jemima West, Nikesh Patel, Roshan Seth and Lillete Dubey.

 

Part 4 of 9
The viceroy gets a royal welcome. A crucial piece of evidence is missing.
Aafrin sends Alice on an urgent errand. Ian gets bad news.

 

THE WIDOWER

Part 3 of 3

Sun., Oct. 18, 9:00 pm

Tues., Oct. 20, 11:00 pm

New

 

This is the true story of Malcolm Webster (Reece Shearsmith), a nurse by
profession and, on the surface, a perfect gentleman – well-spoken, personable
and charming. He’s also a spendthrift and a killer. He marries, and then
attempts to kill, a succession of women to cash in their life insurance policies.

 

Part 3 of 3
As Malcolm continues to evade capture and plots to bigamously marry Simone, DS
Henry is thwarted at every step of his investigation. Time is running out when
he stumbles across a legal ruling that could ultimately lead to Malcolm’s
downfall.

 

GREAT FIRE

Part 1 of 4

Sun., Oct. 18, 10:00 pm

New

 

Watch an epic drama about the 1666 Great Fire of London, when the city burned
for four days. Andrew Buchan stars as Thomas Farriner, whose bakery in
Pudding Lane was the flashpoint for the inferno. Also starring Charles Dance
and Jack Huston.

 

Part 1 of 4
In the sweltering London summer of 1666, Samuel Pepys curries favor with King
Charles II, whose chief of intelligence suspects a plot against the throne.
Fire breaks out in the Pudding Lane bakery of widower Thomas Farriner, father
of two daughters.

 

NA MELE

More! Ledward Kaapana and Family

Mon., Oct. 19, 7:30 pm

New

 

Ledward Kaapana remembers his Uncle Fred Punahoa playing the song “Radio Hula”
in Kalapana: “In the morning, like one, two o’clock in the morning. In Kalapana,
it’s so quiet, so… you know, and it’s dark, and so, he used to just sit outside
on the porch, and play his guitar. I don’t know if you ever experienced
sleeping…and hear one guitar just playing sweet music that just wake you up and
like, ‘Oh, so sweet,’” Kaapana remembers. “Radio Hula” is one of the songs that
Ledward Kaapana, along with his sisters Lehua Nash, Rhoda Kekona, and Lei Aken
play in his Kaneohe garage on a rainy evening. They also share an energetic
slack key performance of “Kuu Ipo Onaona,” and Ledward honors the late Dennis
Kamakahi with “Kokee.”

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW

Seattle, WA, Part 3 of 3

Mon., Oct. 19, 8:00 pm

Encore

 

Host Mark L. Walberg discusses Northwest Coast Indian masks with appraiser Ted
Trotta at the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture. Seattle becomes the
city that sparkles with the discovery of a late-16th-century diamond and enamel
jewel. Other notable finds include a moose, elk and buffalo hide chair; an
1880s crazy quilt; and a white Steiff clown bear worth $2,500-$3,200.

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW

Chicago, IL, Part 1 of 3

Mon., Oct. 19, 9:30 pm

New

 

Travel to Chicago for finds like a 1969 “Chicago Seven” signed subpoena; a
1961 Leonora Carrington oil; and a 1976 Playboy Bunny collection. Which find
is appraised at $200,000-$300,000?

 

I’LL HAVE WHAT PHIL’S HAVING

Hong Kong

Mon., Oct. 19, 10:00 pm

New

 

Journey with Phil Rosenthal, creator of the TV series Everybody Loves
Raymond
, as he learns from chefs, vendors, culinary leaders and
style-setters. Rosenthal visits the kitchens on and off the well-worn
gastronomic path that keep traditions alive and create new ones.

 

Hong Kong
Ride along with Phil as he steps out of his comfort zone in this Asian
metropolis. He tries hot pot and a classic dish of century-old eggs, and
even seeks medical aid in the form of unusual tea.

 

JAPANESE AMERICAN LIVES

Don’t Lose Your Soul/Honor & Sacrifice

Mon., Oct. 19, 11:00 pm

Encore

 

Don’t Lose Your Soul
This film is a portrait of bassist Mark Izu and drummer Anthony Brown, two
founders of the Asian American Jazz Movement. It traces the origin of their
partnership forged in the crucible of the ethnic-identity movements of the
70s, the political force of their band United Front, and their seminal tribute
to the Japanese internment experience, Big Bands Behind Barbed Wire.

 

Honor & Sacrifice
This film tells the complex story of a Japanese immigrant family ripped apart
by WWII. The Matsumoto family included five sons; two who fought for the
Americans and three who fought for the Japanese. The eldest, Hiroshi (Roy),
became a hero, fighting against the Japanese with Merrill’s Marauders, an
American guerrilla unit in Burma.

 

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX

Gerri Hayes

Tues., Oct. 20, 7:30 pm

Encore

 

For businesswoman Gerri Hayes, being told that “you can’t do it” just makes her
more determined to succeed. Gerri shares her survival story as a single mother
of two young children who moved to Hawaii to take a human-services job that
didn’t materialize. She founded a business, Office Pavilion Hawaii, providing
furniture to workplaces. It was hailed by Pacific Business News as 2011’s top
female-owned business in the Islands, with revenues that year of $37 million.

 

This program will be rebroadcast on Wednesday, Oct. 21 at 11:00 pm and Sunday,
Oct. 25 at 4:00 pm.

 

A CHEF’S LIFE

Ramp-ing Up to Spring

Wed., Oct. 21, 7:30 pm

New

 

A Chef’s Life is a cooking and documentary series that takes viewers inside
the life of Chef Vivian Howard, who, with her husband Ben Knight, opens a fine
dining restaurant in her small hometown in Eastern North Carolina. Each episode
follows Vivian out of the kitchen and into cornfields, strawberry patches and
hog farms as she hunts down the ingredients that inspire her menus. Using a
chef’s modern sensibilities, Vivian explores Southern cuisine, past and present
– one ingredient at a time. A celebration of true farm-to-table food, the series
combines the action and drama of a high-pressure business with the joys and
stresses of family life.

 

Ramp-ing Up to Spring
Vivian hunts for ramps – Appalachian wild leeks – with bacon purveyor Alan
Benton near his home in the Tennessee countryside. Vivian’s “ramp dealer”
brings her his freshest stash, foraged from the North Carolina mountains.
Vivian uses ramps like a spring onion, serving up grilled ramps, pickled
ramps and sautéed ramps at a dinner party.

 

PBS HAWAII PRESENTS

Aloha Buddha

Thurs., Oct. 22, 9:00 pm

Encore

 

Through first person accounts, this film chronicles the changes and adjustments
that Japanese Buddhism adopted when it came to Hawaii, eventually becoming one
of the most unique forms of Buddhism in the world. Elderly temple members and
Buddhist priests, along with recently discovered vintage color footage, unfurl
the history and provide a rare glimpse into the birth of American Buddhism.

 

GLOBE TREKKER

Barcelona City Guide

Thurs., Oct. 22, 10:00 pm

New

 

When you think of Barcelona, you think of the architect Gaudí, and host Megan
McCormick visits some of his most famous creations, including El Park Güell,
Casa Batlló and the spectacular basilica, Sagrada Familia, still under
construction more than 120 years after the first brick was laid. She also
takes in the works of artists Picasso and Miró, and takes a day trip to
Cadaques, home of Salvador Dalí.

 

WELL READ

David Brooks: The Road to Character

Thurs., Oct. 22, 11:00 pm

New

 

This series features lively, engaging conversations about ideas in literature.
Host Terry Tazioli introduces the latest books — both fiction and non-fiction
— and interviews noted authors about the themes in their latest works.
Following each interview, Seattle Times book editor Mary Ann Gwinn joins
Tazioli to further explore the literary themes of the week’s book and to
recommend related authors and other reading material.

 

David Brooks: The Road to Character
New York Times columnist and author David Brooks discusses his book
The Road to Character.

 

GREAT PERFORMANCES

Billy Elliot: The Musical Live

Fri., Oct. 23, 9:00 pm

New

 

Based on the popular 2000 film, Billy Elliot: The Musical took London’s
West End and Broadway by storm, winning the 2009 Tony Award for Best Musical.
Featuring a rousing score by Elton John, the story takes place during North
East England’s contentious mining strike of 1984 and tells the inspirational
story of a young boy’s journey from the boxing ring to the ballet barre,
transforming his family and his community.

 

A CRAFTSMAN’S LEGACY

Clockmaker

Sat., Oct. 24, 1:00 pm

New

 

Host Eric Gorges goes on a quest to discover the true craftsmen in today’s
world. Traveling across the country, Gorges interviews the men and women
responsible for carrying the tools, trades and traditions of fine craftsmanship
into the 21st century. Gorges, a welder by trade, meets and interviews master
craftsmen, and learns why they chose their craft, where they learned their
skills, how they live using their talents and the challenges and importance of
keeping those traditions alive in a modern-day world.

 

Clockmaker
Welcome to the magical world of a clockmaker, where the gears are lovingly
handmade and time truly does stand still. Eric visits clock maker Nate Bowers
to create a beautiful exposed gear clock.

 

THE MIND OF A CHEF

Napkin

Sat., Oct. 24, 7:00 pm

New

 

Ever since 1999, when Chef Gabrielle Hamilton put canned sardines and Triscuits
on the first menu of her tiny, 30-seat East Village restaurant, Prune, she has
nonchalantly broken countless rules of the food world. Prune has always been an
idiosyncratic restaurant, with no culinary mission other than to serve what
Hamilton likes to eat in an environment in which she wants to eat. Hamilton won
the James Beard Foundation’s Best Chef NYC in 2011 and is author of a
best-selling memoir, Blood, Bones and Butter, which garnered a James
Beard Award for Writing and Literature in 2012.

 

Napkin
Explore both contemporary and classic Italian culture with Chef Gabrielle as
she takes in the century-old work around her that’s grounded in tradition and
respect, but also quiet and not for personal gain.

 

JOSEPH ROSENDO’S TRAVELSCOPE

Surprising Toronto

Sat., Oct. 24, 7:30 pm

New

 

Joseph explores Toronto’s emerging neighborhoods and discovers that change can
mean repurposing old buildings, welcoming new businesses, and building new
facilities and infrastructure.

 

60s & 70s Slow Songs

Sat., Oct. 24, 8:00 pm

New

 

Relive memorable nights of slow dancing and romancing to favorite love songs,
featuring unforgettable classics from The 5th Dimension, Dusty Springfield,
Kenny Rogers, Dolly Parton and many others.

 

Il Volo: Live From Pompeii

Sat., Oct. 24, 9:30 pm

Encore

 

Soar with the perfect harmony of the charming trio as they pay homage to their
home country. The young tenors perform classic Italian favorites and original
songs in this new concert special filmed in the spectacular ancient ruins of
Pompeii. Songs include “Grande Amore” and “Volare.”

 

AUSTIN CITY LIMITS

Sturgill Simpson/Asleep at the Wheel

Sat., Oct. 24, 11:00 pm

New

 

Sturgill Simpson’s performs songs from his album Metamodern Sounds in
Country Music
; Asleep at the Wheel play songs from the album Still the
King: Celebrating the Music of Bob Wills and His Texas Playboys
.

 

Public Affairs

 

THE OPEN MIND

Sun., Oct. 18, 6:00 pm

New

 

Hosted by Alexander Heffner, this weekly public affairs program is a thoughtful
excursion into the world of ideas, exploring issues of national and public
concern with the most compelling minds of our times.

 

FRONTLINE

Immigration Battle

Tues., Oct. 20, 10:00 pm

New

 

Gain insight into the hard-fought battles and secret negotiations over
immigration reform on Capitol Hill. Examine President Obama’s push for policy
changes that could affect the fate of millions and define for decades what it
means to be American.

 

HIKI NŌ

Thurs., Oct. 22, 7:30 pm

New

 

This episode is the second in a series of six shows in which each episode
focuses on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is
kuleana, which means responsibility. Each of the following stories reflects
this theme:

 

The top story comes from the students at Waianae High School in West Oahu. They
feature Waianae High School graduate and UFC (Ultimate Fighting Championship)
fighter Max Holloway, who feels it is his kuleana to represent the Waianae
community in the most positive way possible when he competes. Max also takes
his responsibilities to his wife and young son very seriously. Having been
severely neglected by his own parents, Max wants to make sure his son does not
have to suffer the same sort of childhood.

 

Also featured are student-created stories from the following schools:

 

Kamehameha Schools Kapalama (Oahu): A one-day community service event for
Kamehameha Schools Kapalama seniors builds character and nurtures lifelong
community service.

 

Kainalu Elementary School (Oahu): Student Caleb McCrillis was concerned when
his great grandmother became the victim of a phone scam. He felt it was his
kuleana to warn other senior citizens about phone scams and produced a PSA
offering tips on how seniors can avoid being conned.

 

Aliamanu Middle School (Oahu): Students and teachers at Aliamanu Middle School
take responsibility and raise awareness of the hazards for pedestrians
jaywalking near a major intersection in Salt Lake.

 

Keaau High School (Hawaii Island): Keith “Brudda Skibs” Nehls starts the
non-profit organization, Basic Image, that maintains Honolii and other Hawaii
Island parks for free.

 

Ewa Makai Middle School (Oahu): Although it has earned him a reputation as the
meanest teacher at Ewa Makai Middle School, science teacher David Wong has made
it his kuleana to teach his students what they need to succeed in high school
and beyond.

 

Moanalua High School (Oahu): Moanalua High School student Jacob Genovese deals
with the responsibilities and challenges of fatherhood, full-time work and
school.

 

This episode is hosted by Kaimuki High School in Honolulu.

 

This program encores Saturday, Oct. 24 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, Oct. 25 at 3:00
pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAII

What is the Future for Hawaii’s Largest Power Utility?

Thurs., Oct. 8, 8:00 pm

New

 

A multi-billion dollar deal merging Hawaiian Electric and its subsidiaries with
Florida energy company NextEra Energy is on the table. NextEra Energy says it
will provide a more affordable clean energy future for Hawaii, but opponents have
concerns over how a merger might impact consumers and Hawaii’s renewable energy
goals. The pending deal has also prompted some to examine the merits of other
available options, such as utility cooperatives or county-run utilities. Kauai
Island Utility Cooperative President and CEO David Bissell, President of NextEra
Energy Hawaii Eric Gleason, Governor David Ige, and HECO President and CEO Alan
Oshima will participate in the discussion.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAII is a live public affairs show that is also streamed live
on PBSHawaii.org. Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email, or
Twitter. You may also email your questions ahead of time to insights@pbshawaii.org or
post them to our Facebook page www.facebook.com/PBSHawaii.

 

WASHINGTON WEEK WITH GWEN IFILL

Fri., Oct. 23, 7:30 pm

New

 

For 40 years, WASHINGTON WEEK has delivered one of the most interesting
conversations of the week. Hosted by Gwen Ifill, it is the longest-running
public affairs program on PBS and features a group of journalists
participating in roundtable discussion of major news events.

 

CHARLIE ROSE – THE WEEK

Fri., Oct. 23, 8:00 pm

New

 

This weekly series features the iconic TV anchor’s focus on the events and
conversations shaping this week and the week ahead. Drawing on conversations
from his nightly PBS program and new insightful perspectives from around the
world, it captures the defining moments in politics, science, business,
culture, media and sports.

 

THE MCLAUGHLIN GROUP

Fri., Oct. 23, 8:30 pm

New

 

THE MCLAUGHLIN GROUP is an unscripted forum featuring some of the greatest
political analysts in the nation.

 

SCIENCE & NATURE

 

NATURE

Pets: Wild at Heart: Playful Creatures

Wed., Oct. 21, 8:00 pm

New

 

In this program filled with innovative photography and scientific revelation,
we investigate how our favorite pets get in touch with their wild side through
play. From talkative budgies, marathon-running hamsters, wall-climbing cats and
diving dogs, discover how our pets’ playful games are just a whisker away from
the wild.

 

NOVA

Sinkholes: Buried Alive

Wed., Oct. 21, 9:00 pm

Encore

 

In Tampa, Florida, in February 2013, a giant hole opened up under the bedroom
floor of Jeffrey Bush, swallowing the 36-year-old as he slept. His body was
never found. Bush was a victim of a sinkhole – a growing worldwide hazard that
lurks wherever limestone and other water-soluble rocks underpin the soil. When
carbon dioxide in the air dissolves in rainwater, it forms a weak acid that
attacks the soft rocks, riddling them with holes. Sinkholes can occur gradually
when the surface subsides into bowl-shaped depressions or suddenly, when the
ground gives way – often catastrophically. With compelling eyewitness video of
dramatic collapses, NOVA follows scientists as they explore the underlying
forces behind these natural disasters, traveling the globe to investigate what
it’s like to have your world vanish beneath your feet.

 

THE BRAIN WITH DAVID EAGLEMAN

What Makes Me?

Wed., Oct. 21, 10:00 pm

New

 

Neuroscientist David Eagleman explores the human brain in an epic series that
reveals the ultimate story of us – why we feel and think the things we do. This
ambitious series blends science with innovative visual effects and compelling
personal stories.

 

What Makes Me?
Explore how we are our brains: how our personality, emotions and memories are
encoded as neural activity. The process of becoming continues through our lives.
We change our brains and our brains change us.

 

HISTORY

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE

The Forgotten Plague

Tues., Oct. 20, 9:00 pm

Encore

 

By the dawn of the 19th century, the deadliest killer in human history,
tuberculosis, had killed one in seven of all the people who had ever lived.
The disease struck America with a vengeance, ravaging communities and
touching the lives of almost every family. The battle against the deadly
bacteria had a profound and lasting impact on the country. It shaped medical
and scientific pursuits, social habits, economic development, western expansion,
and government policy. Yet both the disease and its impact are poorly understood:
in the words of one writer, tuberculosis is our “forgotten plague.”

 

DIY

 

AMERICAN WOODSHOP

Home Trims

Sat., Oct. 24, 2:00 pm

New

 

Host Scott Phillips guides us through the creations of many unique pieces,
from spice cabinets to decorative picture frames and mirrors to a plantation
table – all things you can make in your woodshop at home.

 

Home Trims
Scott features scrolling brackets for doorways, carving weather vanes and
totem accents.

 

ASK THIS OLD HOUSE

Sat., Oct. 24, 2:30 pm

New

 

A driveway pothole is more than meets the eye for Roger. See what he found and
how he patches it. Watch Tom and Kevin get a history lesson from the Shakers to
build a nightstand and see Scott dust off an old railroad lantern and give it
new life.

 

THIS OLD HOUSE

Bracing the Basement

Sat., Oct. 24, 3:00 pm

New

 

Tommy replaces rotten lally columns in the basement. Norm removes the marble
sink and claw-foot tub from the guest bath to restore them. Richard discovers
a historic house with 19th-century air conditioning and plumbing. Tom saves
hardwood floors.

 

MARTHA BAKES

Celebration Cakes

Sat., Oct. 24, 4:00 pm

New

 

Martha Stewart makes three easy-to-prepare layer cakes to mark a special
celebration: a sprinkle cake; a fanciful hedgehog cake with meringue spikes;
and her daughter’s coconut-covered heart cake.

 

COOK’S COUNTRY FROM AMERICA’S TEST KITCHEN

Break Out the Bourbon

Sat., Oct. 24, 4:30 pm

New

 

Test cook Julia Collin Davison uncovers secrets to perfect smoked bourbon
chicken. Then, test cook Bridget Lancaster shows host Christopher Kimball how
to make the ultimate sweet potato pie at home.

 

LIDIA’S KITCHEN

A Perfect Weeknight Meal

Sat., Oct. 24, 5:00 pm

New

 

Chef Lidia Bastianich conjures simple, seasonal and economical dishes with
grace, confidence and love. She teaches viewers to draw on their roots, allow
for spontaneity and cultivate a sense of home in the kitchen. Filled with tips
and techniques collected through years in the kitchen and at the family table,
Lidia channels her passion for teaching into a fun and trustworthy curriculum
of kitchen wisdom.

 

A Perfect Weeknight Meal
Lidia shares some of her quickest and simplest recipes that will work in any
kitchen. The menu includes: carrot and apple salad; salmon fillets served with
savory potatoes; and a crumble that can be made with almost any seasonal fruit.

 

SIMPLY MING

Tiffani Faison

Sat., Oct. 24, 5:30 pm

New

 

SIMPLY MING returns for another season of mouth-watering recipes, celebrity
appearances and culinary road trips. Each episode kicks off with a technique
demonstration, followed by two dishes — one prepared by a nationally renowned
guest chef and one by host Ming Tsai. This season focuses on comfort food —
from childhood classics to melting-pot dishes from around the world.

 

Tiffani Faison
Top Chef all-star Tiffani Fasion stops by the loft kitchen to make
savory pancakes, including banh xeo, a Vietnamese fried pancake loaded with
shrimp. Ming follows up with a clam okonomiyaki, Japanese savory pancake topped
with a variety of ingredients.

 

PROGRAM LISTINGS
Oct. 11 – 17, 2015

 

Arts, Drama, Culture

 

THE GREAT BRITISH BAKING SHOW

Biscuits and Traybakes

Sun., Oct. 11, 1:00 pm

New

 

Follow the trials and tribulations of 13 passionate amateur bakers whose goal is
to be named the U.K.’s best amateur baker. Each week, the bakers tackle a different
skill, the difficulty of which increases as the competition unfolds. Hosts Mel
Giedroyc and Sue Perkins coax them through their Signature, Technical and
Showstopper challenges, under the scrutiny of judges Mary Berry and Paul
Hollywood. After 10 weeks of whisking, crimping and piping, only one can emerge
victorious.

 

Biscuits and Traybakes
Join the remaining eight bakers as they produce favorite traybakes, offering
twists on everything from bakewell tarts to banoffee pies to brownies. The
Technical challenge is a French classic: tuiles. For the Showstopper,
they construct biscuit towers of epic proportions.

 

HOME FIRES ON MASTERPIECE

Part 2 of 6

Sun., Oct. 11, 7:00 pm

New

 

Witness the bitter rivalry between Frances Barden (Samantha Bond of Downton
Abbey
fame) and Joyce Cameron (Francesca Annis) to control the Women’s
Institute in a rural English town as it struggles with the onset of World War II.

 

Part 2 of 6
The Women’s Institute is back, and the RAF arrives in town. Pat endures abuse.
Alison’s dog has a close call. The local doctor faces up to his fate.

 

INDIAN SUMMERS ON MASTERPIECE

Part 3 of 9

Sun., Oct. 11, 8:00 pm

New

 

Julie Walters stars as the glamorous doyenne of an English social club in the
twilight era of British rule in India. Set in a subtropical paradise, the series
dramatizes the collision of the high-living English ruling class with the local
people agitating for Indian independence. As the drama unfolds, the two sides
alternately clash and merge in an intricate game of power, politics and passion.
Also starring in the lavish production are Henry Lloyd-Hughes, Jemima West,
Nikesh Patel, Roshan Seth and Lillete Dubey.

 

Part 3 of 9
Sooni gets into trouble. Witness-tampering runs riot. Ramu confronts Armitage
at the annual fair. Dougie confesses to Sarah.

 

THE WIDOWER

Part 2 of 3

Sun., Oct. 11, 9:00 pm

Tues., Oct. 13, 11:00 pm

New

 

This is the true story of Malcolm Webster (Reece Shearsmith), a nurse by
profession and, on the surface, a perfect gentleman – well-spoken, personable
and charming. He’s also a spendthrift and a killer. He marries, and then
attempts to kill, a succession of women to cash in their life insurance policies.

 

Part 2 of 3
After two failed attempts on Felicity’s life, Malcolm returns to Scotland and
reinvents himself – this time as the perfect boyfriend to Simone. However, DS
Henry is hot on his heels and will stop at nothing to prevent the next murder.

 

NA MELE

Ledward Kaapana and Family

Mon., Oct. 12, 7:30 pm

Encore

 

On most Friday evenings, slack key artist Ledward Kaapana gets together with
his neighbors to share potluck dishes, laughter and music. For Ledward, it’s a
tradition that goes back to his younger days in Kalapana on the island of Hawaii.
“When I was growing up, we used to have kani ka pila…everybody sit down
and enjoy, listen to music,” Ledward remembers. This special Na Mele features
Ledward and his sisters Lei Aken, Lehua Nash, and Rhoda Kekona, playing their
music in Ledward’s garage. Ledward’s falsetto voice leads off with “Nani,” and
Lei, Lehua and Rhoda take vocal solos on “Kanohe,” “Kalapana” and “Holei.” Sit
back and enjoy!

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW

Seattle, WA, Part 2 of 3

Mon., Oct. 12, 8:00 pm

Encore

 

It wouldn’t be a visit to Seattle without a ride up the Space Needle! Host Mark L.
Walberg and appraiser Nicholas Lowry visit the tower to talk about World’s Fair
posters. Seattle’s discoveries run the gamut with a circa 1964 Star Trek
script and pitch letter; a Civil War dog collar; and Harriet Frishmuth bookends
valued at $10,000.

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW

Albuquerque, Part 3 of 3

Mon., Oct. 12, 9:30 pm

New

 

Albuquerque reveals classic items from the past, including a 1962 sonic blue
Fender Stratocaster; a 1965 Beatles-signed photo and letter; and French filigree
earrings, ca. 1775. Learn which is valued at $45,000!

 

I’LL HAVE WHAT PHIL’S HAVING

Paris

Mon., Oct. 12, 10:00 pm

New

 

Journey with Phil Rosenthal, creator of the TV series Everybody Loves
Raymond
, as he learns from chefs, vendors, culinary leaders and style-setters.
Rosenthal visits the kitchens on and off the well-worn gastronomic path that keep
traditions alive and create new ones.

 

Paris
Join Phil in the place he calls the “City of Sweets” as he indulges in some of
the finest hot chocolate and football-sized croissants. He also searches for the
best roast chicken and vegetable-centric dishes.

 

JAPANESE AMERICAN LIVES

Mrs. Judo: Be Strong, Be Gentle, Be Beautiful

Mon., Oct. 12, 11:00 pm

Encore

 

Using rare archival footage, intimate interviews and plenty of on-the-mat action,
filmmaker Yuriko Gamo Romer eloquently brings to life the inspiring story of a
remarkable woman and judo master. At a time when women went from childhood home
to wife and homemaker, Keiko Fukuda made an unpopular choice and took a
different path, saying, “This [judo] was my marriage…this is when my life
destiny was set.” This documentary beautifully showcases the life of Sensei
Fukuda, presenting her as not only a pioneer for women but as an inspiration.

 

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX

Benny Rietveld

Tues., Oct. 13, 7:30 pm

New

 

Benny Rietveld’s first experience playing music was at the age of six, in the
piano department at Gem’s in Kapalama. “I liked the idea that you could press
something, and it creates this…cool sound,” Rietveld remembers. He was mentored
by band director Henry Miyamura at McKinley High School, and played in local
jazz and rock bands before moving to San Francisco and touring with Sheila E.
and Miles Davis. Today, Benny Rietveld plays bass for Carlos Santana, and still
sits in with the Hawaii musicians he grew up with.

 

This program will be rebroadcast on Wednesday, Oct. 14 at 11:00 pm and Sunday,
Oct. 18 at 4:00 pm.

Mary Tyler Moore: A Celebration

Tues., Oct. 13, 8:00 pm

New

 

Mary Tyler Moore “turned the world on with her smile” on The Dick Van Dyke
Show
, The Mary Tyler Moore Show and on the silver screen. This special
features classic clips plus comments from Betty White, Ed Asner, Valerie
Harper, Cloris Leachman, Gavin MacLeod, John Amos, Carl Reiner, Dick Van Dyke,
and Moore herself. Plus, Oprah Winfrey recounts Mary Tyler Moore’s critical
role as TV’s first independent career woman.

 

A CHEF’S LIFE

Chicken Lickin’

Wed., Oct. 14, 7:30 pm

New

 

A Chef’s Life is a cooking and documentary series that takes viewers inside the
life of Chef Vivian Howard, who, with her husband Ben Knight, opens a fine
dining restaurant in her small hometown in Eastern North Carolina. Each episode
follows Vivian out of the kitchen and into cornfields, strawberry patches and
hog farms as she hunts down the ingredients that inspire her menus. Using a
chef’s modern sensibilities, Vivian explores Southern cuisine, past and present
– one ingredient at a time. A celebration of true farm-to-table food, the series
combines the action and drama of a high-pressure business with the joys and
stresses of family life.

 

Chicken Lickin’
As Vivian waits for spring’s vegetables to appear, she pauses to appreciate
chicken’s endless capacity as an ingredient. The restaurant’s new best-seller
is a whole chicken, pounded and stuffed with broccoli salad. An old family
friend fries a chicken the old-fashioned way, served with a side of banana
sandwiches.

 

PBS Hawaii: Celebrating 50 Years with Songs of Aloha

Thurs., Oct. 15, 8:00 pm

Encore

 

Robert Cazimero states, “It’s a testament to a time gone by, that really might
not be seen again.” Jon de Mello, owner and CEO of Mountain Apple Company, says,
“This show is the top of Hawaiian music in the 20th century.”

 

Robert Cazimero and Jon de Mello are referring to Hawaii: Songs of Aloha, a
program originally broadcast to a national PBS audience in the year 2000 that
gathered some of Hawaii’s brightest stars on one stage: The Brothers Cazimero,
Amy Hānaiali‘i Gilliom, Willie K, O’Brian Eselu, Makaha Sons, Jake
Shimabukuro, Nā Leo, Hapa, Ledward Kaapana, Cyril Pahinui and the
Kamehameha Schools Concert Glee Club. On Monday, October 5 at 7:30 pm, to
commemorate 50 years of public television in Hawaii, PBS Hawaii will bring back
this historic treasure as PBS Hawaii: Celebrating 50 Years with Songs of Aloha.
Join PBS Hawaii President and CEO Leslie Wilcox and co-host Robert Cazimero as
PBS Hawaii presents a timeless program that captures magical moments of
Hawaiian music and dance.

 

LIVE FROM LINCOLN CENTER

Kern & Hammerstein’s Show Boat

Fri., Oct. 16, 9:00 pm

New

 

This groundbreaking musical redefined entertainment and changed the face of
American theater. Spanning the years from 1880 to 1927, Jerome Kern and Oscar
Hammerstein II’s lyrical masterpiece concerns the lives, loves and heartbreaks
of three generations of show folk on the Mississippi River, in Chicago and on
Broadway. The musical’s impact remains unparalleled, addressing racial
prejudice, and introduced a bi-racial cast to Broadway at its premiere while
also pointing the way toward a new synthesis between music and spectacle. This
New York Philharmonic production features an all-star cast led by Vanessa
Williams and Downton Abbey’s Julian Ovenden, with Norm Lewis, Jane
Alexander, Fred Willard and Lauren Worsham. The Philharmonic’s full sound
highlights the lush musical score at the center of this epic show.

 

THE MIND OF A CHEF

Hustle

Sat., Oct. 17, 7:00 pm

New

 

Ever since 1999, when Chef Gabrielle Hamilton put canned sardines and Triscuits
on the first menu of her tiny, 30-seat East Village restaurant, Prune, she has
nonchalantly broken countless rules of the food world. Prune has always been
an idiosyncratic restaurant, with no culinary mission other than to serve what
Hamilton likes to eat in an environment in which she wants to eat. Hamilton
won the James Beard Foundation’s Best Chef NYC in 2011 and is author of a
best-selling memoir, Blood, Bones and Butter, which garnered a James
Beard Award for Writing and Literature in 2012.

 

Hustle
Roll up your sleeves and learn why hustle is at the core of the restaurant game.
Chef Gabrielle meets up with an old friend to talk about harder times and the
joys of cooking humble and memorable dishes.

 

JOSEPH ROSENDO’S TRAVELSCOPE

Adventures in California’s Tri-Valley

Sat., Oct. 17, 7:30 pm

New

 

Joseph sets out on a California exploration through the state’s Tri-Valley
region. In his visit to the Amador, Livermore and San Ramon valleys he learns
that while searching the world for the exotic, often we miss the exciting,
surprising and pleasurable experiences that await close to home. In the Tri-
Valley cities of Pleasanton, Livermore, San Ramon and Dublin and the town of
Danville, Joseph discovers a slew of little-known attractions that include a
thriving wine region, historic towns, a diverse culinary scene and art, music
and cultural festivals. And what is most impressive, is that although just 33
miles from San Francisco, California’s Tri-Valley region continues to honor its
historic roots, which date back centuries, while it enthusiastically celebrates
its new communities.

 

Simon & Garfunkel: The Concert in Central Park

Sat., Oct. 17, 8:00 pm

Encore

 

Join the iconic duo and the more 500,000 fans who came out for this once-in-a
-lifetime 1981 benefit concert for the world’s most famous urban park. The
concert features the Simon and Garfunkel’s greatest hits, including “Mrs.
Robinson,” “The Sounds of Silence,” “Bridge Over Troubled Water,” “59th St.
Bridge Song (Feelin’ Groovy)” and many others.

 

The Tenors: Under One Sky

Sat., Oct. 17, 9:30 pm

Encore

 

The Tenors – Remigio Pereira, Victor Micallef, Fraser Walters and Clifton Murray
– deliver a blend of classical and contemporary pop that developed from their
backgrounds: two members are classically trained opera singers and two are from
the world of pop and stage music. Thrill to their rich and soulful voices as
they sing arrangements beloved songs, including “Lean on Me,” “Besame Mucho”
and “You Are So Beautiful.”

 

AUSTIN CITY LIMITS

Cassandra Wilson

Sat., Oct. 17, 11:00 pm

New

 

Jazz singer Cassandra Wilson celebrate Billie Holiday was she performs “Strange
Fruit,” “Don’t Explain, “Good Morning Heartache” and other Holiday classics from
the tribute album Coming Forth by Day.

 

Public Affairs

 

THE OPEN MIND

Sun., Oct. 11, 6:00 pm

New

 

Hosted by Alexander Heffner, this weekly public affairs program is a thoughtful
excursion into the world of ideas, exploring issues of national and public
concern with the most compelling minds of our times.

 

FRONTLINE

My Brother’s Bomber, Part 3

Tues., Oct. 13, 10:00 pm

New

 

For some 25 years, FRONTLINE producer Ken Dornstein has been haunted by the
bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland – the terrorist act that
killed 270 people, including his older brother David. Now, in this emotional
and suspenseful three-part special, Dornstein sets out to find the men
responsible for one of the worst attacks on Americans before 9/11. From the
ruins and chaos of post-Qaddafi Libya, Dornstein hunts for clues to the
identities and whereabouts of the suspects, whom he tracks for almost five
years across the Middle East and Europe. With each episode, Dornstein encounters
new witnesses and unearths fresh evidence that brings him closer to the truth.
Watch this rare, real-life spy thriller that’s also a timely reflection on the
legacy of America’s long war on terror and a meditation on loss, love, revenge
and the nature of obsession.

 

HIKI NŌ

Thurs., Oct. 15, 7:30 pm

New

 

This is the premiere episode of HIKI NŌ Season 7, and the first in a series
of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value.

 

The Hawaiian value for this show is ho’omau, which means to persevere,
perpetuate, or continue.

 

The top story comes from the students at Maui High School, who follow
former UH Wahine Volleyball star Cecilia Fernandez as she battles
adenocarcinoma, a rare form of lung cancer. As a former athlete, Cecilia
is used to contesting opponents by following a carefully devised game-plan.
But because so little is known about this disease, Cecilia must persevere
against an enemy she is not familiar with: uncertainty.

 

Also featured are these student stories:
Roosevelt High School on Oahu tell the story of Papahana Kuaola, a non-profit
organization in Kaneohe that contributes to the preservation of Hawaiian
culture through the preservation of land and native plants, public awareness
and the use of chant.

 

Kapolei High School on Oahu profile Kapolei football player Papu Uti, who lost
his leg from a debilitating accident but expects to return to playing football
with a prosthetic leg.

 

Connections Public Charter School on Hawaii Island feature world-renowned
slack key guitarist Cyril Pahinui, who continues his father Gabby Pahinui’s
legacy by using his father’s teaching methods at workshops.

 

Ke Kula Niihau O Kekaha Public Charter School on Kauai tells the story of
teacher Hope Kaimi Strickland who, raised on Niihau Island, honors her
deceased husband’s wishes for their children to learn her Hawaiian culture
and Niihau Hawaiian dialect.

 

Waianae Intermediate School on Oahu feature fellow student Crystal Cebedo.
Crystal deals with the uncontrollable aspects of her life, such as her mother’s
cancer, by keeping busy and meeting life’s challenges.

 

Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island shows us how the Kona Historical
Society built an authentic, old-fashioned Portuguese oven for baking bread
as a part of its efforts to recreate the traditions of old Kona.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students from Radford High School on Oahu.

 

This program encores Saturday, Oct. 17 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, Oct. 18 at
3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website,
www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

WASHINGTON WEEK WITH GWEN IFILL

Fri., Oct. 16, 7:30 pm

New

 

For 40 years, WASHINGTON WEEK has delivered one of the most interesting
conversations of the week. Hosted by Gwen Ifill, it is the longest-running
public affairs program on PBS and features a group of journalists participating
in roundtable discussion of major news events.

 

CHARLIE ROSE – THE WEEK

Fri., Oct. 16, 8:00 pm

New

 

This weekly series features the iconic TV anchor’s focus on the events and
conversations shaping this week and the week ahead. Drawing on conversations
from his nightly PBS program and new insightful perspectives from around the
world, it captures the defining moments in politics, science, business, culture,
media and sports.

 

THE MCLAUGHLIN GROUP

Fri., Oct. 16, 8:30 pm

New

 

THE MCLAUGHLIN GROUP is an unscripted forum featuring some of the greatest
political analysts in the nation.

 

SCIENCE & NATURE

 

FIRST PEOPLES

Europe

Sun., Oct. 11, 10:00 pm

Encore

 

See how the mixing of prehistoric human genes led the way for our species to
survive and thrive around the globe. Archaeology, genetics and anthropology
cast new light on 200,000 years of history, detailing how early humans became
dominant.

 

Europe
When Homo sapiens turned up in prehistoric Europe, they ran into the Neanderthals.
The two types of human were similar enough to interbreed – and they were just
as capable of making artifacts. But as more Homo sapiens moved into Europe,
there was an explosion of art and symbolic thought. The balance of power had
shifted and Neanderthals were overwhelmed.

 

NATURE

Soul of the Elephant

Wed., Oct. 14, 8:00 pm

New

 

Ironically, every dead elephant with its ivory intact is a reason to celebrate.
It means an elephant died of natural causes, not bullets, snares or poison, and
a soul was allowed to be celebrated and mourned by its herd. Award-winning
filmmakers Dereck and Beverly Joubert start with the remains of two bull
elephants and through a series of key flashbacks, look at the lives they would
have led, the dramas they may have seen, their great migrations for water with
their families, and their encounters with lions and hyenas. This film, shot over
two years, is an intimate look at elephants through the lens of two great
storytellers of natural history.

 

NOVA

Cyberwar Threat

Wed., Oct. 14, 9:00 pm

New

 

Through startling, previously unreported detail, delve into the chilling new
reality of cyberwar, in which cyber weapons can inflict physical damage on our
factories, power plants and pipelines, leaving us vulnerable to crippling
attacks.

 

THE BRAIN WITH DAVID EAGLEMAN

What is Reality?

Wed., Oct. 14, 10:00 pm

New

 

Neuroscientist David Eagleman explores the human brain in an epic series that
reveals the ultimate story of us – why we feel and think the things we do.
This ambitious series blends science with innovative visual effects and
compelling personal stories.

 

What is Reality?
Dr. Eagleman takes viewers on an extraordinary journey, exploring how the brain,
locked in silence and darkness, without any direct access to the outside world,
constructs multi-sensory reality and conjures up the rich and beautiful world we
all take for granted.

 

HISTORY

 

SECRETS OF THE DEAD

The Real Trojan Horse

Tues., Oct. 13, 9:00 pm

New

 

Discover new archeological evidence that suggests Troy and the Trojan War may
be more than myth. If the legendary siege did happen, was there really a wooden
horse that brought enemy soldiers inside the fortified city?

 

DIY

 

AMERICAN WOODSHOP

Headboards & Bedsteads

Sat., Oct. 17, 2:00 pm

New

 

Host Scott Phillips guides us through the creations of many unique pieces, from
spice cabinets to decorative picture frames and mirrors to a plantation table –
all things you can make in your woodshop at home.

 

Headboards & Bedsteads
Scott demonstrates how to make handcrafted bed accents from century-old
yellow pine.

 

ASK THIS OLD HOUSE

Sat., Oct. 17, 2:30 pm

New

 

From chaps to eye protection, watch Roger and Kevin go over the dos and don’ts
of chainsaw use. See Scott work with a homeowner to improve the electrical
connection to a garage. Tom helps a new mom by silencing squeaky floors in her
baby’s room.

 

THIS OLD HOUSE

The Kitchen Came Tumbling Down

Sat., Oct. 17, 3:00 pm

New

 

Roger saves the plants that are removed to make way for the Victorian’s porch.
Tom starts demo to open up the kitchen and determine how he’ll support the weight
of the house. Norm learns about details. The window pulley systems are repaired.

 

MARTHA BAKES

Pulled Doughs

Sat., Oct. 17, 4:00 pm

New

 

Join
Martha Stewart to learn expert tips you’ll need to prepare pizza, pretzels and
strudel – all Old World European specialties that involve pulling dough.

 

COOK’S COUNTRY FROM AMERICA’S TEST KITCHEN

All-American Sweet Dough Desserts

Sat., Oct. 17, 4:30 pm

New

 

Test cook Julia Collin Davison revives a classic recipe for peach kuchen.
Then, tasting expert Jack Bishop challenges host Christopher Kimball to a
tasting of peach jam. Finally, test cook Erin McMurrer shows Chris how to make
the perfect kolaches.

 

LIDIA’S KITCHEN

Cozy Wintertime Kitchen

Sat., Oct. 17, 5:00 pm

New

 

Chef Lidia Bastianich conjures simple, seasonal and economical dishes with grace,
confidence and love. She teaches viewers to draw on their roots, allow for
spontaneity and cultivate a sense of home in the kitchen. Filled with tips and
techniques collected through years in the kitchen and at the family table,
Lidia channels her passion for teaching into a fun and trustworthy curriculum
of kitchen wisdom.

 

Cozy Wintertime Kitchen
The combination of potatoes and pasta in one dish is not unusual in Italy,
and in her pipette with sweet potatoes, Lidia adds a beloved American
ingredient to give it a complex finish. She also prepares veal stew with onion
and squash is a perfect one-pot meal, in which the protein and vegetables come
together.

 

SIMPLY MING

Ed Lee

Sat., Oct. 17, 5:30 pm

New

 

SIMPLY MING returns for another season of mouth-watering recipes, celebrity
appearances and culinary road trips. Each episode kicks off with a technique
demonstration, followed by two dishes — one prepared by a nationally renowned
guest chef and one by host Ming Tsai. This season focuses on comfort food —
from childhood classics to melting-pot dishes from around the world.

 

Ed Lee
This week it’s all about steak in Ming’s loft kitchen! Chef Edward Lee of 610
Magnolia stops by to grill up a rich rib eye with spicy gochujang butter, while
Ming whips up a delicious shitake-umami glazed steak.

 

Special Programming

 

Suze Orman’s Financial Solutions for You

Thurs., Oct. 15, 10:00 pm

Encore

 

Up-to-date advice on a broad set of financial issues from Suze Orman, America’s
most recognized expert in personal finance, includes: how to invest; whether to
buy or rent a home; saving for retirement; what kind of life insurance to buy;
wills and trusts; student loans and more. Orman offers tangible information on
managing money today and how to make smarter choices for a more economically
secure future.

 

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