guitar

NĀ MELE
Ledward Kaapana and Family

 

On most Friday evenings, slack key artist Ledward Kaapana gets together with his neighbors to share potluck dishes, laughter and music. For Ledward, it’s a tradition that goes back to his younger days in Kalapana on the island of Hawaii. “When I was growing up, we used to have kani ka pila…everybody sit down and enjoy, listen to music,” Ledward remembers. This special Na Mele features Ledward and his sisters Lei Aken, Lehua Nash and Rhoda Kekona, playing their music in Ledward’s garage. Ledward’s falsetto voice leads off with “Nani,” and Lei, Lehua and Rhoda take vocal solos on “Kaneohe,” “Kalapana” and “Holei.”

 

 




NĀ MELE
Waipuna

 

Kale Hannahs, David Kamakahi and Matt Sproat of the acclaimed Hawaiian music group Waipuna present their interpretation of Hawaiian music, accompanied by hula dancer Jaimie Kennedy. From “Malama Mau Hawai‘i,” a selection from Waipuna’s first album, to “E Mau Ke Aloha,” composed by David’s father, Dennis Kamakahi, Waipuna will take you through a joyful musical cycle.

 

 

THE KATE
Jimmy Webb with Ashley Campbell

 

The legendary Grammy-winning songwriter (“Wichita Lineman,” “MacArthur Park,” “Up, Up and Away,” “Highwayman”) shares hits and demonstrates his storytelling prowess. In an emotional set, Webb introduces rising country star Ashley Campbell, daughter of his best friend, the late Glen Campbell. The elegant duo is accompanied by guitar and string quartet.

 

 

NĀ MELE
Richard Ho‘opi‘i and George Kahumoku Jr.

 

Richard Ho‘opi‘i and George Kahumoku Jr. walked into the PBS Hawai‘i studio, sat down with their instruments, and began to play. George, with his mellow slack key guitar and soothing voice, performing alongside Richard, with his never ending smile and his beautiful falsetto, offered song after song, with talk story in-between. This impromptu concert can only be described as pure joy.

 

 

NĀ MELE
Natalie Ai Kamauu and Family

 

Natalie Ai Kamauu’s voice fills the PBS Hawaii studio.  Natalie performs with a passion that comes from the origins of the songs she sings, and the love she has for her family. She is joined by her husband, Iolani Kamauu, on guitar and vocals, and their daughter, Sha-Lei Kamauu, who accompanies the music with hula.

 

Among the songs featured are “Pili Aloha,” which connects Natalie to her mother, kumu hula Olana Ai, and “Shower Tree,” which was written for Natalie and Iolaniʻs son, Chaz. Sha-Lei joins Natalie and Iolani with hula, including the playful “Hula Tease,” and a graceful accompaniment to Natalie and Iolaniʻs performance on “Uhiwai.”

 

NĀ MELE
Keauhou

 

Young trio Keauhou stand framed by red velvet curtains, white columns and koa furniture – a recreation of a bygone era, when Waikiki was about opulence and old-world splendor. While these young men have no firsthand experience of this era, when they sing, their ringing falsetto sounds right at home. Composed of Zachary Lum (vocals and guitar), Jonah Kahanuola Solatorio (vocals and ‘ukulele), and Nicholas Lum (vocals and bass), the name Keauhou translates as “the new or renewed generation,” fitting for a group that plays traditional Hawaiian music from the early to mid-20th century with a modern approach. The program features original songs from the group, such as “Hanohano Haʻiku,” “Kahiko Kapalama,” and “Aloha Maunalua” as well as a special guest performance from mentor and musical legend Robert Cazimero.

 

 




AUSTIN CITY LIMITS
John Prine

AUSTIN CITY LIMITS: John Prine

 

Hailed as “the Mark Twain of American songwriting” by Rolling Stone, John Prine (who made his ACL debut on Season 3 in 1978) makes his highly-anticipated eighth appearance on Austin City Limits with a new batch of songs from his just-released The Tree of Forgiveness.

 

 

 

 

NĀ MELE
Keali‘i Reichel

NĀ MELE: Guest artist Keali'i Reichel

 

Keali‘i Reichel has long established himself as one of Hawai‘i’s premier artists. His dedication to the perpetuation of Hawaiian language, song, chanting and hula has evolved into unique and personal performances that showcase the depth of Hawaiian culture for international audiences. This performance, recorded at the PBS Hawai‘i studio, excellently showcases his artistry.

 

 

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