Hawaiʻi Island

HIKI NŌ
Compilation Show from the Spring Quarter of the 2018-2019 School Year

 

This compilation show features some of the top stories from the Spring Quarter of the 2018-2019 school year. Besides being excellent stories, these pieces all explore the connections between people and, in some cases, between people and other living things.

 

Students from McKinley High School in Honolulu tell the story of teenagers who connect with senior citizens in ways that bridge the generation gap.

 

Students from Waiʻanae High School in Central Oʻahu tell the story of a young tattoo artist who uses his art form to connect with his Hawaiian heritage.

 

Students from Konawaena High School on Hawaiʻi Island feature a 96-year-old Holocaust survivor who connects with Big Island students by teaching them about the devastating effects of bigotry and racism.

 

Students from Hilo Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island focus on the special connection between a bone marrow donor and the recipient of that donation who discover (despite the astronomical odds against it happening) that they live just minutes away from one another.

 

Students from Kua O Ka Lā Miloliʻi Hipuʻu Virtual Academy on Hawaiʻi Island follow conservationists who are facilitating the connection between male and female members of an endangered Hawaiian crow in order to save the species from extinction.

 

Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauaʻi introduce us to a singing nun who uses music to help students connect with the values she tries to instill in them.

 

Students from Maui High School in Kahului show us how a disabled student makes profound connections with her non-disabled peers through a program developed by the Special Olympics.

 

Students from Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a pet placement service that connects homeless canines with their forever owners.

 

This special episode is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ graduate from Waiʻanae High School on Oʻahu who has just completed her junior year at Menlo College in Northern California, where she majors in marketing and human resources.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Unified Sports

 

TOP STORY

 

“Unified Sports”
Students from Maui High School in Kahului feature fellow student Britney Bautista. Britney, who has a developmental delay syndrome, has gained a sense of belonging through the school’s Special Olympics Unified Sports program. This program brings students with and without disabilities together to participate in sports, socials, and other extracurricular activities. Britney is also one of only twelve U.S. youth ambassadors to the Special Olympics, which gives her a voice to advocate for the advancement of inclusive youth leadership. “My goal is to introduce Special Olympics to the younger generation,” says Britney. “I want them to learn that everyone is the same, and nobody should be judged by what their physical characteristics look like.”

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

Students from Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy in Waimea on Hawaiʻi Island introduce us to a wahine paniolo champion.

 

Students from Hilo Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a bone marrow donor in Hilo who discovered that the recipient of his bone marrow lives just a few minutes away from him.

 

Students from Hawaiʻi Technology Academy on Oʻahu profile Hawaiʻi’s fledgling ice hockey league.

 

Students from Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a dedicated group of dog lovers who place homeless canines with their new, forever owners.

 

Students from Mililani High School in Central Oʻahu share a public service announcement about simple changes people can make that will have a positive impact on life in Hawaiʻi.

 

Plus, a montage of HIKI NŌ stories from Saint Francis School on Oʻahu, whose 95-year-old history is ending at the close of this school year.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ also features students’ profiles on their HIKI NŌ teachers.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Return of the ʻAlalā

 

TOP STORY

 

“Return of the ʻAlalā”
Students from Kua O Ka Lā Miloliʻi Hipuʻu Virtual Academy Public Charter School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of efforts to save an almost extinct bird: the ʻalalā, or Hawaiian Crow, a native species endemic to the forests of Hawaiʻi Island. As of 2002, there were no ʻalalā left in the wild. Thanks to a program spearheaded by the Keauhou Bird Conservation Center in Volcano, ʻalalā were bred in captivity and released into the wild in 2016. The release was not successful and the birds did not survive. But since 2018, a new set of birds released by the center are demonstrating signs of survival and have even split into breeding pairs, a major milestone in the recovery of a lost species.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Aliamanu Middle School on Oʻahu follow administration and staff members at their school who have taken on the challenge of getting fit through walking.

 

–Students from Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui find out how some brand-new drivers are learning to take responsibility behind the wheel.

 

–Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tell the story of a high school track star who was inspired to excel by his father’s courage during a life-threatening illness.

 

–Students from Waiʻanae High School in West Oʻahu tell the story of young tattoo artist who is discovering his identity as a Hawaiian by “making his mark.”

 

Plus, a public service announcement from students at Saint Francis School on Oʻahu on the importance of eliminating plastic straws.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students from Kalani High School in East Oʻahu.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Piano Prodigy

 

TOP STORY

 

“Piano Prodigy”
Students from Island School on Kauaʻi feature 10-year-old piano prodigy Jannik Evanoff. A Kauaʻi resident and Island School 6th grader, Jannik started playing piano when he was six and by the age of eight had already won an international piano competition: the Stage 4 Kids competition in Hamburg, Germany. Jannik now performs internationally and says he does not get nervous before performances, unless it is in front of an audience of 600 or more. His daily piano and violin practices begin at 5:30 am and end at 7:30 pm, with school in between). Jannik was home-schooled for a good part of his childhood in order to keep a schedule that accommodated his music. He is also a gifted student and advanced from the 4th to the 6th grade soon after entering Island School. Although Jannik cannot predict exactly what the future holds for him, he knows that music will remain a major part of his life.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Konawaena High School on Hawaiʻi Island profile 96-year-old Holocaust survivor Goldina Lefkowitz, who speaks at school assemblies about the importance of tolerance and understanding.

 

–Students from Maui High School in Kahului feature a family-run shave ice business that operates out of a classic VW bus.

 

–Students from Kaʻala Elementary School in Central Oʻahu profile a teacher at the school who finds joy in making haku lei and instructs others on how to do the same.

 

–Students from Kealakehe Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island offer a tip on how to save our reefs.

 

–Students from Kalani High School in East Oʻahu find out what makes their wrestling coach tick.

 

–Students from Hongwanji Mission School on Oʻahu tell the story of Taylor Inouye – a young baker at their school who became a finalist in the Food Network’s Kids Baking Championship.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students from Hāna School in East Maui.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
2019 Legislative Wrap-up

 

State lawmakers went into this year’s legislative session with bills regarding prison reform, loosening marijuana laws, raising the minimum wage, plastic waste, disaster relief, more money for schools and resolving water rights issues across the state. What were the successes and failures? And what else should have been talked about?

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 


HIKI NŌ
#1014 – Top Stories from the Winter Quarter of the 2018-2019 School Year

HIKI NŌ #1014 – Top stories from the Winter Quarter of the 2018-2019 school year

 

This compilation show features some of the top stories from the Winter Quarter of the 2018-2019 school year:

 

–Students from Maui High School in Kahului introduce us to Maui High robotics captain John Fabella. John’s mother passed away when he was just seven years of age, and his father was deported. Growing up without his biological parents, John found an extended family in his Maui Waena Intermediate School robotics team and later, in the Maui High School team.

 

Program

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School on tell the story of a female wrestler who used to be teased and bullied about her weight, and lost the pounds to regain her self-esteem.

 

–Students from Kalāheo High School in Windward O‘ahu focus on the importance of taking responsibility while driving. Their story is framed by the recent traffic fatalities in the Kaka‘ako neighborhood of O‘ahu and how that tragedy sparked a family’s memories of losing their daughter in a drunk driving incident.

 

–Students from Hawai‘i Preparatory Academy Middle School in the Waimea district of Hawai‘i Island show us the proper way to saddle a horse.

 

–Students from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu feature two cancer survivors who battled with their diseases at a very early age: Lily Mallory, who was undergoing treatment for her cancer at the age of three, and Emi Robison, who was battling leukemia at the age of seven.

 

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i introduce us to Mike Coots, a surfer and photographer from Kīlauea, Kaua‘i, who lost his leg in a shark attack and now, ironically, works to protect sharks against the ravages of the shark fin soup industry.

 

–Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului feature a food truck owner who starts a pay-it-forward campaign to help feed workers affected by the recent federal government shutdown.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu introduce us to figure skater and Moanalua High School senior Kyra Fukumoto. While Hawai‘i has only one ice skating rink, and its resources for training figure skaters is very limited compared to the Mainland, Kyra is adamant about being based out of her home state. She is very proud of being from Hawai‘i and looks forward to representing the islands in her career as a figure skater.

 

This special episode is hosted by Tyler Bright, a 2018 HIKI NŌ graduate from Wai‘anae High School on O‘ahu who is currently studying biology at Chaminade University in Honolulu, with hopes of becoming either a canine rehabilitation therapist or a physical therapist.

 

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
HIKI NŌ Class of 2018 Special, Part 2 of 4

HIKI NŌ Episode #923: Class of 2018 Part 2 of 4

 

This is the second of four specials in which outstanding HIKI NŌ graduates from the Class of 2018 gathered at PBS Hawaiʻi to discuss their HIKI NŌ experiences and how they feel the skills they learned from HIKI NŌ will help them in college, the workplace and life.

 

 

This episode features Tyler Bright, who graduated from Waiʻanae High School in West Oʻahu and is now majoring in biology at Chaminade University in Honolulu; Ronald Crivello-Kahihikolo, who graduated from Konawaena High School on the Kona side of Hawaiʻi Island and is now majoring in journalism at Emerson College in Boston; and Marlena Lang, who graduated from Kauaʻi High School in Līhue and is now majoring in broadcast journalism at Biola University in Southern California.

 

To start off the show, each graduate shows a HIKI NŌ story that they worked on and discusses what they learned from the experience of working on that particular story. Tyler presents her story “Voyaging Through Time,” about how members of the Polynesian Voyaging Society are passing their knowledge to the next generation. Ronald shows “The Red-Headed Hawaiian,” about a fair-skinned, red-headed Native Hawaiian who shed his unmotivated attitude toward school when he decided he wanted to become a doctor. Marlena cites her story “The Fact of You,” a personal essay about the search for one’s own truth in this often superficial age of social media and 24/7 news coverage.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 29 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 30 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.