health

Dave Shoji

Cover story by Liberty Peralta, PBS Hawaiʻi

 

Hawaiʻi volleyball fans know him as one of the sport’s winningest coaches of all time. Dave Shoji, former University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa’s Wahine Volleyball Coach, is featured this month on a new episode of Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox.

 

After defeating Santa Clara University on September 6, 2013, Dave Shoji became the winningest coach in NCAA Division-I women’s volleyball at the time.

After defeating Santa Clara University on September 6, 2013, Dave Shoji became the winningest coach in NCAA Division-I women’s volleyball at the time.

 

During his 42-year career, Shoji’s teams won more than 1,200 matches, more than 85 percent – one of only a handful of coaches in the National Collegiate Athletic Association to have done so.

 

Despite his success as a volleyball coach, Shoji pursued other sports as a student athlete. Growing up in Southern California, Shoji played high school football, basketball and baseball. Of the three, he says baseball was his best sport; it led to an athletic scholarship to the University of California – Santa Barbara.

 

Left: Shoji (center) in 1969 in Knoxville, Tennessee with the UC Santa Barbara volleyball team after winning the national title against UCLA. Right: Shoji in 1994 coaching the UH Wahine volleyball team

Shoji (center) in 1969 in Knoxville, Tennessee with the UC Santa Barbara volleyball team after winning the national title against UCLA. Photo Courtesy of the Shoji FamilyShoji in 1994 coaching the UH Wahine volleyball team Courtesy of University of Hawaiʻi Media Relations

 

His college baseball career, however, didn’t last long. “I realized at that time that I wasn’t going to go anywhere in baseball,” Shoji says. “I was too small and my arm wasn’t good enough; I didn’t have any power. It’s just a different game in college.”

 

UC Santa Barbara ended up being the place where Shoji discovered volleyball, a relatively new collegiate sport at that time in the 1960s. With Shoji on the team, UCSB won a national championship in 1969, and he became an All-American player in the sport. He later took his volleyball chops with him to the Army, where he served on active duty for two years.

 

After completing college and his military service, Shoji moved to Hawai‘i in the early 1970s and helped set up UH’s new volleyball program – setting the stage for long-term success in the sport. Among his career highlights, he’s led the Rainbow Wahine team to four national championships and nine NCAA Final Four appearances.

 

Dave Shoji on Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox Tuesday, March 31, 7:30 pm

 

Now retired in Honolulu, Shoji is focused on his family, with three grandchildren in South Carolina and Poland. He is also focused on his health. Diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2016, Shoji says he’s grateful for the medical care and support he received during his treatment. “You never know,” he says. “You just pray and you try to live healthy. I’m pretty good right at this moment.”

 

 

 

Relieving Stress with Yoga
with Peggy Cappy

 

Discover how to relieve stress with yoga and special breathing techniques. Using simple strategies that can be added to a daily routine, Peggy shows how to calm the nervous system and ease symptoms of anxiety, including tensions, tightness and pain.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 2|20|20:
John Rao and Other Stories | Program

 

TOP STORY

 

“John Rao”
Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on the island of Kauaʻi tell the story of a man who slowly turned his life around as the result of a spiritual awakening.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

“Young Cartographer”
Students from Hongwanji Mission School in Nuʻuanu Valley on Oʻahu tell the story of a young cartographer who creates imaginative worlds through hand-drawn maps.

 

“How to Make Jewelry from Magazines”
Students from Roosevelt High School on Oʻahu show us a crafty way of making bracelets from old magazines.

 

“Vibrant Hawaiʻi”
Students from Waiākea Elementary School on the Big Island tell the story of a financially struggling, single mother and a visionary community movement that hopes to solve the island’s poverty epidemic.

 

“Hygiene Products for the Homeless”
Students from Aliamanu Middle School on the island of Oʻahu tell the story of middle school students who organized a hygiene drive to help address a prevalent health issue affecting the homeless.

 

“Chef to the Homeless”
Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani tell the story of a chef whose compassion for the disadvantaged led him to work at a homeless shelter.

 

Students from Ewa Makai Middle School host this episode of HIKI NŌ from their campus in Ewa Beach, Oʻahu.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
Suicide Prevention

 

It’s a stunning statement: Suicide is the leading cause of injury-related death in Hawaiʻi. Health officials report that an average of 190 people take their own lives each year. The reasons stem from depression, significant life changes and the trauma of abuse. Nearly a thousand other individuals survive a suicide attempt. But suicide can be prevented, and everyone can help. Join the discussion on Suicide Prevention on INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI. You can phone in or leave us a comment on Facebook or Twitter.

 

Suicide Prevention Hotlines. Oʻahu: 832-3100, Neighbor Islands: 1-800-753-6879

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
Cooked: Survival by Zip Code

 

Learn the story of a heat wave that overtook Chicago in July 1995, killing 739 residents, most of them poor, elderly and African American. The heat wave revealed a long-term crisis of poverty, racism, and economic and social isolation in the city.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
Should Hawaiʻi Increase Regulations on Vaping?

 

Should Hawaiʻi Increase Regulations on Vaping? More State lawmakers are viewing electronic cigarettes as a threat to public health, especially among youth and young adults. Up for consideration is proposed legislation to: 1) Include e-smoking devices in the definition of tobacco products; 2) Ban the sale of some flavored tobacco products; 3) Use money from hikes in fees and taxes for education and prevention programs. Join the conversation on INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI. You can phone in or leave us a comment on Facebook or Twitter.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

OZONE HOLE:
How We Saved the Planet

OZONE HOLE: How We Saved the Planet

 

Discover the forgotten story of the hole in the ozone layer and how the world came together to fix it. Hear from the scientists and politicians who persuaded Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher to take action and solve the planetary problem.

 

Preview

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 10|24|19:
Archers to Art and Other Stories

 

TOP STORY:

 

“Archers to Art”
Students from Ke Kula Niihau O Kekaha Public Charter School on Kauaʻi tell the story of how members of their school’s archery program created, through a process of problem solving, an activity that produces wildly colorful, spontaneous works of art. Student archers decided to place balloons onto the traditional archery targets with the intent of having the arrows burst the balloons. The wind caused the balloons to move around, so the students filled them with water to anchor them in place. They then decided to add paint to the water, and laid cardboard down to avoid messing up the surrounding area. Noticing the colorful designs the splatters created, they replaced the cardboard with watercolor paper. Thus was created this innovative genre of painting.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

“Waimea’s Rain Rock”
Students from Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy Middle School in the Waimea district of Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a legendary rain rock which was said to have saved Waimea from a devastating drought.

 

“Student Poet”
Students from Kauaʻi High School in Līhuʻe tell the story of a young poet who uses creativity to battle depression.

 

“Jiu Jitsu Preacher”
Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani tell the story of a martial arts school that is also a place of worship.

 

“How to Care for an Abandoned Baby Bird”
Students from Īʻao School on Maui show us how to nurse an abandoned baby bird back to health.

 

“Betty Santoki”
Students from Farrington High School on Oʻahu introduce us to a Class of 1962 Farrington graduate who has dedicated her life to keeping Japanese traditions alive in her community.

 

“Suburbia”
A student at H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui shares her inner-most thoughts about becoming a filmmaker in a personal video essay.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students at Montessori School of Maui in Makawao.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
Assisted Community Treatment

 

Additions to an existing law are designed to make it easier for state judges to order homeless people with mental illness into treatment. How does the law work, and does it protect civil liberties? Join the discussion on Assisted Community Treatment on INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI. You can phone in, or leave us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also streamed live on pbshawaii.org and PBS Hawaiʻi’s Facebook page.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

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