heroism

SECRETS OF THE DEAD
Mumbai Massacre

SECRETS OF THE DEAD: Mumbai Massacre

 

For many, what began as a typical day in a bustling cosmopolitan city turned into a nightmarish 60 hours of orchestrated terrorism broadcast live to the world via cell phones and internet, text and Twitter. The same social media tools used in consumer technology to relate vital real-time news of the escalating atrocities and information about victims’ situation were also used by terrorists to coordinate and plan their attacks. In a fascinating yet fatal twist, news media relying on recycled information for their headlines played a central role in a deadly game of cat and mouse between the terrorists and the victims. Told completely from the perspective of victims in their own words, voicemail messages, texts and improvised user-group postings made during the ordeal, “Mumbai Massacre” places viewers inside the harrowing experience as it was lived by survivors caught up in a sudden and indescribable horror. This remarkable program captures the desperation and courage of ordinary people in the face of death and shows how social media became a silent witness and simultaneously transformed news as it happened.

 

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AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
The Big Burn

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: The Big Burn

 

In the summer of 1910, an unimaginable wildfire devoured more than three million acres across the Northern Rockies, confronting the fledgling U.S. Forest Service with a catastrophe that would define the agency and the nation’s fire policy for the rest of the 20th century and beyond. The film provides a cautionary tale of heroism and sacrifice, arrogance and greed, hubris and, ultimately, humility in the face of nature’s frightening power.

 

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PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Lifeline: Pearl Harbor’s Unknown Hero

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS - Lifeline: Pearl Harbor's Unknown Hero

 

Narrated by actor Gary Sinise, PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS Lifeline: Pearl Harbor’s Unknown Hero tells the story of how Joe George became an unlikely hero, and how he was recognized with a Bronze Medal more than 70 years later. “Even though Pearl Harbor was attacked 77 years ago, this is a story people have never heard before,” said Gray, “Individual stories of heroism like this so easily fly under the radar. It is important that people hear them.

 

Read the program guide cover story on Joe George.

 

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Special “Lost Battalion” Film Screening for War Veterans

 

CEO Message

Special “Lost Battalion” Film Screening for War Veterans
World War II veterans Robert Kishinami, Henry Ishida and Takeo Ikeda

World War II veterans Robert Kishinami, Henry Ishida and Takeo Ikeda

 

It was a full house, as sons, daughters and other family members and friends came out in force with some of Hawai‘i’s World War II veterans of Japanese ancestry for a special screening of a documentary film, Rescuing the Lost Battalion: The Story Behind the Heroes. The film was made by the international arm of Japan’s public broadcaster, NHK.

 

It’s a painful war story that many people in Hawai‘i know. Many local boys of Japanese ancestry suffered grievously to save Texas soldiers who were pinned down by German gunfire in steep, dense woods in France. The Japanese Americans had volunteered for their country’s wartime infantry, patriotic to a government that distrusted them.

 

This epic battle is only now starting to become known throughout Japan. The film director, 30-something Yoichiro Sasagawa, and several NHK World-Japan executives came to Honolulu last month and gave local veterans an opportunity to view this English-language version of the film in person before it airs on PBS Hawai‘i next month.

 

Left image: Decorated war veteran Yasunori Deguchi told me he’s always mindful of the fallen soldiers. Center image: Film director Yoichiro Sasagawa (right) greets Laura Miho (seated), widow of veteran/lawmaker “Kats” Miho. Right image: Taeko Ishikawa lost her husband George, her brother Kazuo and her cousin Tsugio in WWII.

Left image: Decorated war veteran Yasunori Deguchi told me he’s always mindful of the fallen soldiers. Center image: Film director Yoichiro Sasagawa (right) greets Laura Miho (seated), widow of veteran/lawmaker “Kats” Miho. Right image: Taeko Ishikawa lost her husband George, her brother Kazuo and her cousin Tsugio in WWII.

 

Nine World War II vets in their 90s, including former Gov. George Ariyoshi, attended, as did four widows of veterans. They were among more than 400 attendees. Widow Taeko Ishikawa still makes every effort to represent her husband George, who passed away in 1970.

 

One of the attending vets, Takeo “Ike” Ikeda, opened up about his experiences in the battle for the Lost Battalion for the first time in his life, in an emotional interview that’s part of the film.

 

This hour-long documentary will air on PBS Hawai‘i at 8:00 pm on Saturday, August 4.

 

Aloha nui,

Leslie signature

 

Leslie Wilcox
President and CEO
PBS Hawai‘i

 

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
The Big Burn

 

In the summer of 1910, an unimaginable wildfire devoured more than three million acres across the Northern Rockies, confronting the fledgling U.S. Forest Service with a catastrophe that would define the agency and the nation’s fire policy for the rest of the 20th century and beyond. The film provides a cautionary tale of heroism and sacrifice, arrogance and greed, hubris and, ultimately, humility in the face of nature’s frightening power.