Human Resources

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Managing Tourism

 

Hawaiʻi’s tourist industry is thriving. Last year, nearly 10 million visitors spent almost 18 billion dollars here, according to the Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority. However, many residents complain of beaches and trails being overrun, and of the wear and tear on Hawaiʻi’s infrastructure. More and more, we hear people saying that the industry needs to be managed, but what does that look like?

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 


Has Sexual Harassment Changed in the Last 20 Years?

 

 

In 1998, University of Texas at Arlington researcher James Campbell Quick published his review of sexual harassment research in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology.

 

Two decades later, Quick teamed up with M. Ann McFadyen, a colleague at UTA, to see just how much—if anything—had changed since he diagnosed the chronic workplace problem in the late ’90s.

 

Sexual Harassment pbs rewire
Source: American Sociological Review

 

In some ways, they learned, the climate of workplace sexual harassment appeared to improve—there has been a 28 percent decline in complaints since 1998, according to Quick and McFadyen’s analysis of U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and Fair Employment Practices Agencies data.

 

But—as has been made clear in headlines over and over the past few months—sexual harassment is an insidious problem that continues to plague workplaces across industries. And the changing demographics of workplaces and methods of harassment make it tougher to track than researchers would like.

 

Not just a ‘woman’s problem’

Though complaints are down overall, complaints filed by men have increased by 15 percent in the past 20 years, the researchers found.

 

This probably doesn’t mean that incidents of sexual harassment against men are increasing—the researchers pointed out that “males in the workplace are simply more willing to file complaints given the reduced stigma around males making complaints. This may be indeed because of increased awareness of what constitutes (sexual harassment) and how to report” it.

 

This probably goes hand in hand with a more inclusive concept of what sexual harassment is. Though there are still stereotypes and misunderstandings surrounding sexual harassment, it’s no longer considered solely a “woman’s problem” as it was 20 years ago, the researchers wrote. Recent studies show that 30 percent of working men experience sexual harassment, as do 50 percent of working women. Men in the military are 10 times more likely to be sexually harassed than civilian men, but 81 percent do not report it.

 

One study the researchers looked at suggested that sexual harassment might be even more damaging to mental health to male victims.

 

“When a man is sexually harassed, it may be more unexpected, have a more stigmatizing effect, and consequently, be more detrimental to mental health,” mental health researcher Dawne Vogt and her team wrote in their paper. “On a related note, it is likely that there is generally more social support available to women compared with men who experience sexual harassment.”

 

A shift in the right direction

These days, the EEOC, the government organization that handles elevated work discrimination complaints, is more likely to find in the favor of the accuser when a sexual harassment complaint is filed than it was 20 years ago. Quick and McFadyen found that “merit resolutions”—findings that indicate the accuser’s complaint had merit—had increased by nearly 40 percent. And the amount of money the EEOC collects on behalf of sexual harassment victims has increased by 6 percent.

 

It’s rare, however, that sexual harassment claims make it that far. In the EEOC’s 2016 report on harassment in the workplace, task force co-chairs Chai R. Feldblum and Victoria A. Lipnic wrote that most cases continue to go unreported. Victims will often change jobs rather than file a formal complaint “because they fear disbelief of their claim, inaction on their claim, blame, or social or professional retaliation.”

 

Sexual Harassment pbs rewire
Source: EEOC and FEPA data

“The least common response to harassment is to take some formal action—either to report the harassment internally or file a formal legal complaint,” Feldblum and Lipnic wrote. “Roughly three out of four individuals who experienced harassment never even talked to a supervisor, manager or union representative about the harassing conduct.”

 

A diversifying workforce

Changing demographics in the workplace also make for some conflicting findings on the realities of sexual harassment. With a growing number of young, educated women in the workforce, some scholars believed sexual harassment would peter out as norms changed. Yet the persistence of sexual harassment, even as workplaces become more superficially equal, supports researcher Berdahl’s belief that harassers might feel threatened by an increase in women in the workplace and double down on harassment as a means of maintaining the status quo, Quick and McFadyen pointed out.

 

More and more attention is being paid to how other identities intersect with sexual harassment—in the majority of past research on sexual harassment, white women were the focus. The black and hispanic subjects of a 2009 study on the intersection of race and sexual harassment published in the Western Journal of Communication “reported sexual harassment experiences that were intertwined with racial discrimination.”

 

Members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer community are more likely to be sexually harassed based on sexual orientation than on gender alone, a recent study by Verónica Caridad Rabelo and Lilia M.Cortina found. These researchers argued this evidence could be used to expand formal sexual harassment protections to include harassment based on sexual orientation.

 

Quick and McFadyen believe more academic attention needs to be paid to these intersections as employers and employees try to snuff out workplace sexual harassment.

 

“There has been progress on some fronts but not on others and the problem has morphed, becoming more complicated for a variety of reasons,” they wrote. “We know that the makeup of the workforce is changing. … We also know little about millennials’ view of what constitutes (sexual harassment) in the workplace, important as this generation is larger than the baby-boomer generation, and have a much different attitude toward work, sexual behavior and responsibility.”

 

Katie Moritz

Katie Moritz is Rewire’s web editor and a Pisces who enjoys thrift stores, rock concerts and pho. She covered politics for a newspaper in Juneau, Alaska, before driving down to balmy Minnesota to help produce long-standing public affairs show “Almanac” at Twin Cities PBS. Now she works on this here website. Reach her via email at kmoritz@tpt.org. Follow her on Twitter @katecmoritz and on Instagram @yepilikeit.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Retain & Recruit

 

Hawai‘i is now at “full employment,” meaning our statewide, adjusted unemployment rate has fallen below 3 percent. In this tight job market, local and national businesses, big and small, are competing for the most qualified employees. While the gap widens between Hawai‘i’s high cost of living and the average salary scale, how can Hawai‘i workers take advantage of this situation – and how can local companies get creative with attracting qualified job candidates?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 





PBS Hawai‘i hires Cheryl Oncea as new Advancement VP

PBS Hawaii

 

PBS Hawaii hires Cheryl OnceaHONOLULU, HI – PBS Hawai‘i has hired Cheryl Oncea as its new Vice President of Advancement. Oncea will head fundraising initiatives at PBS Hawai‘i, a non-profit media organization and Hawai‘i’s only statewide public television station.

 

Oncea has 25 years’ experience in Hawai‘i’s media landscape, leading sales and advertising teams at KSSK Radio, KHON2, Pacific Business News, KGMB and most recently, Hawaii News Now.

 

PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO Leslie Wilcox said, “Cheryl is very skilled and creative in generating revenue support for media enterprises. We’re her first nonprofit, but she knows us well, as an avid viewer and industry colleague.”

 

“I am thrilled that my career path has led me to this opportunity to join PBS Hawai‘i,” Oncea stated. “It is a rare chance to work at a locally owned television station with the specific mission of serving our community and advancing learning and discovery.”

 

Download this Press Release

 

For questions regarding this press release:

 

Contact: Liberty Peralta
Email: lperalta@pbshawaii.org
Phone: 808.973.1383

 

PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. PBSHawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

PBS Hawai‘i hires Jason Suapaia as new Creative Services VP

PBS Hawaii

 

Jason SuapaiaHONOLULU, HI – PBS Hawai‘i has hired Jason Suapaia, a longtime creative professional and executive in Hawaii, as its new Vice President of Creative Services.

 

Suapaia will lead a team of creatives in producing local programs and multimedia content that capture Hawai‘i’s unique stories, music, culture and public affairs.

 

Suapaia, who is leaving his position as President and Executive Producer at Hawai‘i-based creative media agency, 1013 Integrated, said he has enjoyed his commercial career and looks forward to applying his skills at a beloved nonprofit institution.

 

“I’m looking forward to creating content that the people of Hawai‘i find enlightening and meaningful,” he said.

 

“Jason is well-regarded as a team builder and creative problem solver, and he’ll be putting his considerable skills to use in developing and producing quality local programming,” said Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO.

 

Suapaia is an alumnus of the Pacific Century Fellows, Board President of the Film and Video Association of Hawai‘i, co-founder of ‘Ohina The Short Film Showcase, and in 2011 was named as a young business stand-out (Forty Under 40) by Pacific Business News.

 

Download this Press Release

 

For questions regarding this press release:

 

Contact: Liberty Peralta
Email: lperalta@pbshawaii.org
Phone: 808.973.1383

 

PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. PBSHawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

PBS Hawaii hires Linda Brock for content strategy position

Press Release Header

 

HONOLULU, HI – PBS Hawaii welcomes back longtime television and multimedia marketing executive Linda Brock as its first-ever Chief Content Officer. In this newly created role, Brock will lead development of an integrated content strategy, in order to deliver programming in multiple ways to better serve the public.

 

“Linda is a strategic thinker and game changer who researches how people want to consume media,” said Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawaii President and CEO.

 

“She rejoins us as we move to a new building and look forward to offering more collaborations in storytelling, more robust local content, and more interactivity,” Wilcox said.

 

Brock has worked at Honolulu commercial television stations and in the telecommunications industry in Asia. As PBS Hawaii’s previous Vice President of Programming and Communications, Brock was involved in discussions that gave birth to HIKI NŌ, Hawaii’s statewide student news network.

 

Download this Press Release

 

For questions regarding this press release:

 

Contact: Liberty Peralta
Email: lperalta@pbshawaii.org
Phone: 808.973.1383

 

PBS Hawaii is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Hawaii’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawaii and Hawaii to the world. PBSHawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

Jobs

PBS Hawai‘i is an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer, offering jobs in a variety of disciplines such as fundraising, creative services, programming, engineering, information technology, communications and administration. All vacancies are advertised on our website, in print and online recruiting services.

 

See below for a description of the following vacancy (3):

 

• Director of Business Support | Full-Time
• Chief Development Officer | Full-Time
• Clerical Student | Part-Time

 

Full-time employees receive the following benefits:

  • Comprehensive medical, dental, vision and drug plan
  • Life and disability insurance
  • 401k plan available
  • Flexible spending accounts for qualified expenses such as insurance premiums and medical, dependent care, and parking expenses
  • Paid personal time off
  • 11 holidays per year

 

We occasionally have paid and unpaid part-time internships available for students interested in production. Learn more about student positions at PBS Hawaiʻi.

 


Director of Business Support
Full-Time

 

Hawaiʻi’s only locally owned and nonprofit statewide television system, PBS Hawaiʻi, is seeking a savvy, mission-driven sales executive to retain and grow sponsorships of our quality programming.

 

This position requires a creative approach, as sponsorship messages on PBS Hawaiʻi are understated and briefer than in commercial media, and appear in a calm, uncluttered media environment. Sponsors may be businesses, individuals, foundations, government and fellow nonprofits.

 

The Director oversees the full account portfolio, reports to the Vice President of Advancement, and is an important voice in setting rates.

 

Ideal candidate provides excellent service to current supporters and develops connections leading to new sponsors. Responsible for crafting sponsorship proposals, coordinating ad production, and working with support staff on invoicing and scheduling.

 

The successful applicant is organized, outgoing and eager to champion PBS Hawaiʻi’s mission of advancing learning and discovery through storytelling. Bachelor’s degree or relevant success required.

 

To apply, please download PBS Hawaiʻi’s full-time job application (PDF), and submit your completed application, along with your resume and cover letter, by June 25, 2019 by mail, email or fax to:

 

PBS Hawai‘i
Attn: Human Resources
PO Box 29805
Honolulu, HI  96820

Email: humanresources@pbshawaii.org

Fax: 808.462.5090

 

EEO

 

Right/Option Click to Download and Save the PBS Hawai‘i Full-Time Employment Application Form (PDF)

 

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Chief Development Officer
Full-Time

 

The Chief Development Officer serves as a key member of the Advancement Department and will be a lead player in strategy related to major giving to this educational multimedia organization.

 

The successful candidate will forge and maintain relationships to build PBS Hawaiʻi’s community impact and financial resources.

 

Working with the CEO and reporting to the Vice President of Advancement, this professional will have primary responsibility for establishing and implementing a progressive program in major and planned gifts, including the development of key external alliances in philanthropy.

 

Responsibilities

  • Work with the VP of Advancement and other top staffers to develop and implement the organization’s fundraising vision
  • Have primary responsibility for development and execution of proposals and gift agreements
  • Oversee and research funding sources and trends
  • Implement a stewardship program aimed at cultivating deeper ties with donors.
  • Monitor and report regularly on the progress of the major gifts program

Experience

  • Demonstrated success in forging, keeping and expanding relationships with donors; and proven ability to secure major gifts
  • Excellent communications skills, both written and oral; ability to influence and engage a wide range of donors and build long-term relationships
  • Ability to work without close oversight, with excellent organizational and time management skills, and a team player who will productively engage with others at varying levels of seniority within and outside of PBS Hawaiʻi
  • Authenticity, high energy and passion for PBS Hawaiʻi mission
  • Donor-centric vision
  • A professional and resourceful style; takes initiative, and is able to manage multiple tasks and projects at a time
  • Bachelor’s degree or relevant work experience

 

To apply, please download PBS Hawaiʻi’s full-time job application (PDF), and submit your completed application, along with your resume and cover letter, by May 31, 2019 by mail, email or fax to:

 

PBS Hawai‘i
Attn: Human Resources
PO Box 29805
Honolulu, HI  96820

Email: humanresources@pbshawaii.org

Fax: 808.462.5090

 

EEO

 

Right/Option Click to Download and Save the PBS Hawai‘i Full-Time Employment Application Form (PDF)

 

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Clerical Student
Part-Time

 

This student position is an entry-level clerical position within PBS Hawai‘i’s Engineering department. Duties include preparation of purchase orders, processing vendor invoices, tracking payments made to vendors, assist with equipment inventory and receptionist coverage.

 

No experience necessary. Starting pay is $11.00 per hour. This position reports directly to the Chief Engineer. There is flexibility in scheduling work hours.

 

To apply, please download PBS Hawai‘i’s part-time job application (PDF), and submit your completed application, along with your resume and cover letter, by May 31, 2019 by mail, email or fax to:

 

PBS Hawai‘i
Attn: Human Resources
PO Box 29805
Honolulu, HI  96820

Email: humanresources@pbshawaii.org

Fax: 808.462.5090

 

EEO

 

Right/Option Click to Download and Save the PBS Hawai‘i Part-Time Employment Application Form (PDF)

 

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