Hurricane

BREAKING BIG
Mayor Carmen Yulin Cruz

BREAKING BIG: Mayor Carmen Yulin Cruz

 

Track the route of San Juan’s Mayor Cruz after Puerto Rico was slammed by a catastrophic hurricane. The city leader stood up and fought for relief aid, becoming the heroic voice of her struggling island and the Puerto Rican people.

 

Preview

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 906 – 2017 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge

 

This episode features stories from the 2017 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge. In September of 2017, five high schools and nine middle schools participated in a challenge in which teams had exactly four days to conceptualize, shoot, write, and edit a HIKI NŌ story based on a specific theme. No work could be done on the stories prior to the production window because the theme was not revealed until the start of the four-day sprint. The theme of this challenge was “What it’s Like to Walk in Another Person’s Shoes.” No teachers, or adults of any kind, could provide hands-on assistance. It was all up to the students.

 

TOP STORIES
Included in this episode are the winners of the Middle School and High School Divisions of the 2017 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge. The Middle School winners were from ‘Ewa Makai Middle School in the ‘Ewa district of O‘ahu. Their story “Lolita” features a drag queen in his early 20s who explains how taking on his drag persona of Lolita gives him confidence and helps him cope with a sometimes difficult life. The winning High School story, “Hurricane Harvey Relief,” was created by students at Kalaheo High School in Windward O‘ahu. It follows a group of volunteers who put themselves in the shoes of Houston’s Hurricane Harvey victims and helped to collect goods toward the relief effort.

 

ALSO FEATURED
–Students from Maui High School created a story about what it’s like to walk in the shoes of a teen transitioning to a new gender.

 

–Students from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i featured the school band president who is successful at what he does because he tries to walk in the shoes of his fellow musicians.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu stress the importance of empathy in dealing with people who suffer from a very painful condition known as Fibromyalgia.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle show us that walking in the shoes of someone who moved to Hawaiʻi for a better life helps us to better appreciate our island home.

 

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i help us to consider what it’s like being a teenager who is prone to suicide.

 

–Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului tell the story of a cobbler who creates custom shoes for people who can’t wear conventional footwear.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 8, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 9, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Value: Mālama

 

This episode is the final in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is mālama, which means to care for, protect and maintain.

 

The top story comes from the students at Aliamanu Middle School on Oahu, who report on the efforts of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and its community of volunteers to mālama the Hawaiian Monk Seal.

 

Also featured are student stories from the following schools:

 

Seabury Hall Upper School (Maui): Paul Higashino of the Kahoolawe Island Reserve Commission welcomes and relies on the valuable assistance from volunteers in restoration and re-vegetation efforts on Kahoolawe Island, which for decades was used as a target in military exercises.

 

Kauai High School (Kauai): Students cover five key steps in preparing for a hurricane.

 

Maui High School (Maui): Maui resident Martha Watkins learns valuable lessons from caring for her Alzheimer’s Disease-stricken mother.

 

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kauai): Residents of Kauai mālama the traditional process practiced by their ancestors for generations of collecting pa’a’kai – sea salt –from a salt pond in Hanapepe.

 

Waianae Intermediate School (Oahu): Students at Waianae Intermediate School mālama students with severe disabilities by acting as peer tutors in their adapted physical education class.

 

Punahou School (Oahu): Punahou Student Dakota Miller, the youngest beekeeper in Hawaii, cares for an apiary to help protect Hawaii’s dwindling bee population.

 

Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle (Maui): A community rebuilds Koieie Loko Ia, an ancient, royal fishpond in Kihei, Maui.

 

This episode is hosted by Hana K-12 School in Hana, Maui.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 10 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 81 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Ewa Makai Middle School

 

TOP STORY:
Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of Bristyl Dempsey, a thirteen-year-old girl who suffers from Tourette Syndrome – a neurological disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements and vocalizations called tics. Bristyl’s symptoms surfaced when she was in intermediate school. Her tics made her the target of teasing and ridicule by fellow students, and one teacher mistook Bristyl’s involuntary tics as intentional misbehaving in class. Given the pressures this caused, Bristyl’s mother thought it would be better for her daughter to be home-schooled. During her year of home-schooling, Bristyl’s symptoms improved with therapies such as meditation, and her self- esteem increased. She entered Maui High School this year as a freshman and looks forward to a mainstream school experience with her friends and extra-curricular activities such as cheerleading.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
Students from Mid-Pacific Institute on Oahu profile ukulele phenom Jody Kamisato, who chose the high-risk/high-reward route of opening his own music school over the option of being an employee of someone else’s school.

 

Students from Wheeler Middle School in Central Oahu offer tips on how to prepare an emergency kit in the event of a hurricane.

 

Students from Kalani High School in East Honolulu introduce us to The Canvas, a student-designed, student-run work/play space in Kalihi.

 

Continuing with the theme of students creating their own venues of expression, we take a look at a past HIKI NŌ story from Maui Waena Intermediate School about a high school student who created a youth version of TEDex.

 

Students from Kapolei High School in Central Oahu tell the story of a youth volunteer at the no-kill animal shelter OSPCA (Oahu Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals).

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Ewa Makai Middle School.

 

This program encores Saturday, March 12 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, March 13 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


Katrina Ten Years After:
A Second Life, A Second Chance

Katrina Ten Years After: A Second Life, A Second Chance

 

This program looks at how, ten years later, the city of New Orleans has achieved what seemed almost unimaginable a decade ago: the resurrection of one of America’s most beloved cities.