husband

HIKI NŌ 11|21|19:
2019 Fall Challenge

 

This special edition features stories from the 2019 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge.  On October 18, 2019, participating elementary, middle school and high school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the prompt: “Half of Hawaiʻi’s people are struggling financially even while many work two or three jobs.  Produce a story about a person or group of people who are dealing with this predicament.”   Teachers could not provide hands-on help.  The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own.  The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

1.) How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?

2.) How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?

3.) How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, first-place, second-place and third-place awards were given in both the middle school and high school divisions. The following awardees will be featured in the special:

 

First Place in the High School Division:

“Chazz’s World”

The challenge team from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tells the story of Chazz—a high school student who has to work at a pizza parlor to help his family pay the bills.  The story explores the stress and other emotional hardships the situation causes for Chazz.

 

First Place in the Middle School Division:

“Working for Love”

The challenge team from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School tells the story of a wife and husband who are both full-time teachers yet have to work additional jobs in order to make ends meet. (She cleans condos and he runs a yard service.)

 

Second Place in the High School Division:

“For the Family”

The challenge team from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu tells the story of a woman who lost her husband to leukemia and must now raise her daughters as a single mother.

 

Second Place in the Middle School Division:

“Hero Mom”

The challenge team from Maui Waena Intermediate School tells the story of a woman who holds down three jobs to support her family and whose dedication and sacrifice has made her a hero in her daughter’s eyes.

 

Third Place in the High School Division:

“Handling Hawaiʻi’s Financial Demands”

The challenge team from Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi tells the story of two young people who perform in a Polynesian revue but also hold down additional jobs to make ends meet.

 

Third Place in the Middle School Division:

“Go Jimmy Go”

The challenge team from Highlands Intermediate School on Oʻahu tells the story of a saxophone player who heads a very successful, nationally touring musical group but who also teaches at Highlands Intermediate to earn enough money to support his family.

 

First-place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Second-place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Third-place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

THE MINIATURIST ON MASTERPIECE
Part 2 of 3

 

Johannes makes a confession to Nella, promising no more secrets—but his enemies are already closing in. Otto disappears, and Marin reveals her own secret.

 

 

THE MINIATURIST ON MASTERPIECE
Part 1 of 3

 

In 17th-century Amsterdam, a bride’s new husband gives her an extraordinary wedding gift: a cabinet that is a miniature replica of their home that seems to predict and unravel the future with unsettling precision.

 

 

VICTORIA ON MASTERPIECE
Young England

 

This seven-part dramatic series follows Victoria (Jenna Coleman) from the time she becomes Queen in 1837 at the age of 18 through her relationship with Lord Melbourne (Rufus Sewell), her first prime minister and intimate friend, and her courtship and marriage to Prince Albert (Tom Hughes).

 

Young England
On the verge of delivering her first child, Victoria spurns advice and ventures among her subjects, attracting the devoted and demented alike. Miss Skerrett and Francatelli reach their decisive moment.

 

VICTORIA ON MASTERPIECE
Engine of Change

VICTORIA ON MASTERPIECE: Engine of Change

 

This seven-part dramatic series follows Victoria (Jenna Coleman) from the time she becomes Queen in 1837 at the age of 18 through her relationship with Lord Melbourne (Rufus Sewell), her first prime minister and intimate friend, and her courtship and marriage to Prince Albert (Tom Hughes).

 

Engine of Change
With a child on the way, Victoria must choose a regent in case she dies during childbirth. The Tory party disputes her choice, but she and Albert turn the tables with the aid of the latest in 19th-century technology.

 

VICTORIA ON MASTERPIECE
The Queen’s Husband

VICTORIA ON MASTERPIECE: The Queens Husband

 

This seven-part dramatic series follows Victoria (Jenna Coleman) from the time she becomes Queen in 1837 at the age of 18 through her relationship with Lord Melbourne (Rufus Sewell), her first prime minister and intimate friend, and her courtship and marriage to Prince Albert (Tom Hughes).

 

The Queen’s Husband
At loose ends in a foreign land, Albert finds a noble cause. Victoria gets her way at court and resorts to a folk cure in the bedroom. Francatelli does Miss Skerrett a favor – for a price.

 

A Royal Connection

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiBritain’s Queen Victoria, ruler of the most powerful nation in the world in her time, and Queen Emma of Hawai‘i, ali‘i of the most isolated archipelago, formed a friendship that bridged the long distance and the 17-year difference in their ages.

 

It was a friendship born of grief.

 

In the Hawaiian Journal of History, researcher Rhoda E.A. Hackler wrote about the queens’ 20-year, off-and-on correspondence.

 

Queen Victoria lost her husband and the father of their nine children when Prince-Consort Albert was just 42. The following year, the four-year-old son of Queen Emma and her husband, King Kamehameha IV (Alexander Liholiho), died of what was then described as “brain fever.” The child was named Albert, after Victoria’s husband.

 

Queen Victoria, still deeply mourning her husband’s death, reached out to Emma:

 

“As a mother you will understand how fully I am able to appreciate the depth of your grief…As a wife, I can sincerely hope that you may be spared the heavier blow which has plunged me into lifelong sorrow, but which makes my heart tenderly alive to all the sorrows of others.”

 

A year later, Emma wrote to Victoria:

 

“My heart is very, very heavy while I make known to Your Majesty that God has visited with me with that great trouble which in your kind and consoling letter you said you hoped I might be spared. On the 30th of November my Husband, of whose danger I had never entertained one thought, expired suddenly, almost while in the act of speaking to me, and it was a long while before they could make me believe that what I saw was death and that he had really left me alone for the remainder of my life.”

 

Victoria’s reply came quickly:

 

“…My bleeding heart can truly sympathize with you in your terrible desolation! A dear & promising only child & a beloved husband have both been taken from you within two years! Time does not heal the really stricken heart!..”

 

Two years after the death of Queen Emma’s husband, she traveled to England, raised money for the construction of the Cathedral of St. Andrew in Honolulu, and met Queen Victoria.

 

Victoria penned in her journal:

 

“Nothing could be nicer or more dignified than her manner…She was dressed in just the same widow’s weeds as I wear.”

 

Later in Emma’s trip, she was accorded the honor of being asked to spend the night at Windsor Castle.

 

Over the years, the queens shared personal news, much of it sad. Victoria lost a grandchild to diphtheria; Emma noted that typhoid fever was ravaging the Islands, killing “the young and the strong.”

 

Always, in this correspondence between royal “dear friends,” there is a sense of gratitude in being able to express profound loss and in being heard and understood.

 

Aloha a hui hou,
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