immigrant

HIKI NŌ 2|6|20: Mele Murals and Other Stories | Program

 

TOP STORY

 

“Mele Murals”
Students from Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy in the Waimea district of Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of volunteers from an arts organization known as Mele Murals who taught Waimea area students how to use meditation to guide them through the painting of a mural at the Waimea Community Center.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

“Kitten Yoga”
Students from Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of an inventive program launched at the Hawaiʻi Island Humane Society—Kitten Yoga. Kittens for whom the Human Society is trying to find forever homes are allowed to roam around during a yoga class attended by potential cat owners. The play and bonding that goes on between the kittens and the yoga practitioners often lead to adoption.

 

“Goteborg Musubi”
Students from Kapaʻa Middle School on the Garden Island show us how to make a type of musubi (rice ball) unique to Kauaʻi—the Goteborg Musubi, made with a smoked sausage that was introduced to the island by a German stonewall builder during the plantation era.

 

“Malorie Arisumi”
Students from ʻIao School on Maui tell the story of a Maui-based artist who had started a family during her senior year in high school and, consequently, had to delay her college-level art training to a later period in her life.

 

“Working Mom”
Students from Farrington High School in the Kalihi district of O’ahu tell the story of an immigrant from the Philippines who works three jobs in order to make ends meet, much to the chagrin of her teenaged son, who feels his mother is not able to spend enough time with him.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ also features profiles on the unique sports programs offered at some of the schools in the show.

 

 

 

Connecting through Storytelling

 

CEO Message

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO

Over the course of 13 years as CEO of PBS Hawaiʻi, I’ve had ample opportunity to experience something very delightful about our viewers:

 

Many of them are every bit as compelling in communicating as our professional storytellers.

 

Good storytellers know their audience. They know how to connect with emotion and imagination. I think that’s why many of our programs evoke strong responses; and it’s why our viewers’ letters “get” to us.

 

In correspondence, some of our viewers relate family stories passed down through the generations, describing intimate conversations at pivotal times of history, such as the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy, the Pearl Harbor attack and closely fought elections.

 

CEO Message: Connecting through Storytelling

 

It’s a wonderful exchange – viewers writing to amplify something they saw in one of our programs, or to add context, or to riff on a related thought. Often they’re telling of their own experience, after a story that aired on PBS Hawaiʻi has struck a chord in their life.

 

Responding to PBS NewsHour coverage of the crackdown on immigrants seeking shelter and work in the U.S., a Honolulu viewer wrote that more immigrants should be welcomed: “My grandfather, who came from Japan, worked from morning to night for three dollars a day. I am third generation and educated … I will not work at a job where I get dirty. I will not work at a job where I get smelly. I will not work at a job that requires me to carry more than five pounds. I am a typical third-generation immigrant.”

 

Another viewer reached out after seeing the American Experience episode about the Pacific search for Amelia Earhart. Just as if she were having an in-person conversation, she noted that the investigation didn’t seem to include the hypothesis that the ocean had swallowed all trace of evidence.

 

“I think that is really what happened,” she wrote. “But empirical research is never really satisfied with a ‘nothing’ outcome. There has to be something ‘real.’ And more importantly, there has to be ‘closure,’ which may not be true.”

 

As author Annette Simmons said, “Story gives people enough space to think for themselves. The story develops and grows in the mind of the listener …”

 

We’re all the richer for connecting through storytelling.

 

Mahalo nui,

Leslie signature

 

 

NORMAN MINETA AND HIS LEGACY:
AN AMERICAN STORY

NORMAN MINETA AND HIS LEGACY: AN AMERICAN STORY

 

The child of immigrants, Norman Mineta’s uniquely American story charts a path from the shame he experienced as a Japanese American inside a U.S. internment camp during World War II to his triumphant rise to political prominence that has shaped every level of government, and made him one of the most influential Asian Americans in the history of our nation. His distinguished career has been a continuous unmatched slate of firsts, including 20 years in the United States Congress and eventually serving in the cabinets of two presidents from different political parties: Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. Still thriving today in his 80s, he is celebrated as a bipartisan visionary who preached political civility, yet was a bold change-maker with a deft political touch and an inclusive vision of the future.

 

Preview

 

 

 

Chefs Marcus and Vivian:
A Taste of What’s Next

Chefs Marcus and Vivian: A Taste of What’s Next

 

Vivian Howard & Marcus Samuelsson have been traveling around the country to better understand immigrant foodways. While in Los Angeles, the two chefs visit Grand Central Market to meet new friends who contribute to the richness of L.A.’s food scene.

 

 

 

FRONTLINE
Kids Caught in the Crackdown

 

Exposing the traumatic stories of migrant children detained under Trump’s immigration policies. An investigation with The Associated Press into the widespread consequences – and business – of the mass confinement of migrant children. Also, a report on the sexual exploitation of women in Iraq.

 

 

 

FINDING YOUR ROOTS
Black Like Me

 

This acclaimed series with Professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. explores the mysteries, surprises and revelations hidden in the family trees of popular figures.

 

Black Like Me
Bryant Gumbel, Tonya Lewis-Lee and Suzanne Malveaux discover a tapestry of the unexpected in their ancestry, revealing slaves and free people of color, Civil War legacies and forgotten European origins.

 

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
Harvest Season

INDEPENDENT LENS: Harvest Season

 

A story usually hidden behind a more glamorous front, Harvest Season probes the lives of the multigenerational Latinos, temporary laborers, and permanent residents intimately connected to the production of premium wines in the Napa and Sonoma regions of Northern California — in the midst of one of the most dramatic grape harvests in recent memory.

 

Preview

 

 

 

POV
The Feeling of Being Watched

 

In the Chicago suburb where journalist Assia Boundaoui grew up, most residents in her Muslim immigrant neighborhood believe they are under surveillance. Assia investigates and uncovers FBI documents about “Operation Vulgar Betrayal,” one of the largest pre-9/11 counterterrorism probes conducted on domestic soil, right in Assia’s hometown.

 

 

 

FINDING YOUR ROOTS
Hollywood Royalty

 

Henry Louis Gates, Jr. helps actors Isabella Rossellini, Anjelica Huston and Mia Farrow unearth surprising new revelations about their family histories, taking them generations beyond their famous cinematic forebears.

 

 

 

1 2 3 5