industrial

INDEPENDENT LENS
My Country No More

INDEPENDENT LENS: My Country No More

 

Between 2011 and 2016, oil drilling in rural North Dakota reached its peak, setting off a modern-day gold rush in the quiet, tight-knit farm town of Trenton, North Dakota, population less than 1000. With billions of dollars to be gained in an industry-friendly state with a “reasonable regulation” climate, small towns like Trenton became overwhelmed by an influx of workers, and countless acres of farmland were repurposed for industrial development. Through the voices of Trenton’s residents, My Country No More challenges the notion of “progress” and questions the long-term human consequences of short-term approaches to land use, decisions that ultimately affect all Americans, rural and urban alike.

 

Preview

 

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
What Lies Upstream

 

In the unsettling exposé What Lies Upstream, investigative filmmaker Cullen Hoback travels to West Virginia to study the unprecedented loss of clean water for over 300,000 Americans in the 2014 Elk River chemical spill. There he uncovers a shocking failure of regulation from both state and federal agencies and a damaged political system where chemical companies often write the laws that govern them. While he’s deep into his research in West Virginia, a similar water crisis strikes Flint, Michigan, revealing that the entire system that Americans assume is protecting their drinking water is fundamentally broken.

 

 

GLOBE TREKKER
Road Trip: Rust Belt Highway, USA

 

Trekker Megan McCormick takes to the road to explore the industrial heartland of America, through some of America’s most underrated regions and beautiful countrysides. Megan takes us through the cities of Pittsburgh, Detroit and Flint, Michigan, along the famous Highway 61 before we skirt the shores of the Great Lakes. In Ohio, she visits Cleveland, Toledo and Akron, the former “Rubber Capital of the World.”

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #803

 

TOP STORY:
Students from H.P. Baldwin High School in Wailuku, Maui tell the story of Karina Bhattacharya, a young artist diagnosed with bi-polar disorder. Bi-polar disorder, also known as manic depression, is a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity levels and the ability to carry out day-to-day tasks. Although her condition has presented Karina with many challenges, she tries to keep a positive outlook. Studies have shown that one silver-lining of bi-polar disorder is its possible link to increased creativity. Karina feels that it has had a positive effect on her painting. “I could see everything the way it was,” says Karina, “and I even started noticing small details. I noticed that my paintings became more vivid. I use new colors…” The ability to express herself through her art has also helped Karina deal with her disorder.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
Students at Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a young man who restored his religious beliefs by organizing musical events for a faith-based community organization.

 

Students from Pacific Buddhist Academy on O‘ahu demonstrate the steps involved in a traditional Buddhist incense ritual.

 

The journalists from Mililani Middle School in Central O‘ahu highlight the efforts of fellow students who are restoring ancient Hawaiian fishing areas around Mokauea Island in the airport industrial area.

 

Students from Kaua‘i High School in Lihu‘e show us the ins and outs of a bio-mass plant on the Garden Isle.

 

And the students at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i show us how a family that drag races together, stays together.

 

This program encores Saturday, Dec. 3 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Dec. 4 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



“Won’t You Be My Neighbor?”
–Mister Rogers

Trolley: Thank you for being our neighbor!

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiYour team at PBS Hawai‘i took a cue from our favorite guy in a sweater, Mister Rogers, and invited scores of neighboring businesses to an open house. After a half-century in Manoa, we’re newbies in a new home across town at Nimitz Highway and Sand Island Access Road. We’re honored to occupy this building created by the people of Hawai‘i.

 

Staff members took individuals and groups on tours through our building, and there was time along the way to stop and get acquainted. “I watched your building going up,” said Curtis Sasaki of next-door office-supplies distributor Conrad Enterprises, a family business. “Thanks for having me over. I’m curious to see the inside, the TV part.” He told us about his own company’s move into the neighborhood, back in 1988, from Kakaako.

 

Our other next-door neighbor is Storage Castle, with the turret wall on Nimitz. The self storage company’s Richard Parry made a good point: “A lot of people think of residential communities when they think of neighbors. But when you think of how much time you spend at work, we need to think of fellow businesses as neighbors and support each other if we can.”

 

We felt terrific support even before we moved in, as the big dog in the ‘hood, Matson, contributed $50,000 to our NEW HOME Campaign.

 

Matson’s affable Gary Nakamatsu motioned to the windows facing Nimitz. “All those drivers go past this area on Nimitz Highway – they just drive right by and they don’t see the great variety of businesses here that do a lot for our state.”

 

Variety, indeed! The Sand Island business district is a crazy quilt of industry and industriousness. Construction companies, candy sales, landscapers, document-shredding, a bakery, garbage collection, balloons, restaurants, dry cleaning, a cement maker, musical instruments. And of course, the Coast Guard. Among organizations that came by to say hi and check out our open, cheerful new work space were Honolulu Disposal Service, McDonald’s, First Hawaiian Bank, New Hope Oahu, Office Pavilion, and a scrappy entrepreneur, Primo Popcorn, owned by the multi-generational Sato family. They’re fearless in translating new flavors to popcorn. Prime rib, end cut? You got it. Kim chee? No problem. Baked potato? Here you go.

 

Each establishment has a story. And of course, we love stories. Our mission is advancing learning and discovery, through multi-media storytelling.

 

We’re glad to add another dash of variety to the neighborhood mix. Thank you, Sand Island area businesses, for being our neighbors.

 

A hui hou kakou—until next time,
Leslie signature

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Edison

 

The holder of more patents than any other inventor in history, Thomas Alva Edison had amassed a fortune and achieved glory as the genius behind such revolutionary inventions as sound recording, motion pictures and electric light. This film offers new perspectives on the man and his milieu, and illuminates the nature of inventing and its role in turn-of-the century America’s rush to the future.