industry

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI: What’s it Going to Take?
Hawaiʻi’s Resilience Through the Pandemic

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI: What’s it Going to Take? Hawaiʻi’s Resilience Through the Pandemic

 

On this week’s INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI What’s it Going to Take?, we’ll discuss Hawaiʻi’s Resilience Through the Pandemic. Like the rest of the world, our state has had to pause and hit the reset button due to the novel coronavirus. While much uncertainty remains, there’s optimism that we will emerge from this crisis in a strong position to face the future. Communities across Hawaiʻi are helping those in need. But there’s still much work to do as we figure out a new normal. You can join the conversation by phoning in, or leave us a comment on Facebook or Twitter.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
What’s it Going to Take? Managing Tourism in Hawaiʻi

 

This week’s INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI is a special edition, expanded to 90 minutes, asking What’s it Going to Take? Managing Tourism in Hawaiʻi. The tourism industry is one of the State’s largest employers and has been the driving force of our economy. But there are costs to the arrival of more than 10 million visitors each year, including overcrowded beaches, traffic and the wear and tear on natural treasures. The coronavirus pandemic is now crippling the visitor industry. This could be a rare opportunity to reshape the future of tourism in Hawaiʻi. You can join the conversation by phoning in, or leave us a comment on Facebook or Twitter.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

PBS HAWAIʻI PRESENTS
Reel Wāhine of Hawaiʻi

 

Opening Comments: Leslie Wilcox with Vera Zambonelli and Shirley Thompson, the producers of Reel Wāhine of Hawaiʻi

 

 

 

Reel Wāhine of Hawaiʻi

 

 

 

Closing Comments: Vera Zambonelli and Shirley Thompson

 

 

 

About the Film

 

Reel Wāhine of Hawaiʻi is an hour-long compilation of six locally produced short films that tells the stories of Hawaiʻi-based women filmmakers, taking them from behind the camera to out in front:

 

–CONNIE M. FLOREZ, Founder, Hula Girl Productions

 

HEATHER HAUNANI GIUGNI, Producer, Family Ingredients; Founder, ʻUluʻulu: The Henry Kuʻualoha Giugni Moving Image Archive of Hawaiʻi

 

–VICTORIA KEITH, Producer/camera operator, The Sand Island Story

 

CIARA LEINAʻALA LACY, Writer/producer/director, Out of State

 

–ANNE MISAWA, Director/cinematographer/producer; Associate Professor, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa – Academy for Creative Media

 

JEANNETTE PAULSON HERENIKO, Founding Director, Hawaiʻi International Film Festival

 

The six short films recount each woman’s creative philosophies, challenges and triumphs in contributing to Hawaiʻi’s film industry.

 

The shorts are produced by Hawaiʻi Women in Filmmaking, a nonprofit organization with a mission to redress gender inequity in the film industry. The organization’s executive director, Vera Zambonelli, directed the short film on Paulson Hereniko.

 

Hawaiʻi-based Women Filmmakers

 

REEL WĀHINE OF HAWAIʻI - Hawaiʻi-based women filmmakers: Top row l-r: Connie M. Florez, Heather Haunani Giugni, Victoria Keith. Bottom row l-r: Ciara Leinaʻala Lacy, Anne Misawa, Jeanette Paulson Hereniko.
Top row l-r: Connie M. Florez, Heather Haunani Giugni, Victoria Keith.
Bottom row l-r: Ciara Leinaʻala Lacy, Anne Misawa, Jeanette Paulson Hereniko.

 

“In Hawaiʻi, we have a strong history of women behind the camera, including Native Hawaiians and women of color,” Zambonelli said. “Most of them have never told their stories before, and their accomplishments are great. We need to research, record and disseminate this knowledge to counter the ways that academic and cultural histories regularly neglect women’s authorship and work in film and in the arts in general.”

 

The series was also a training opportunity for young graduates of Hawaiʻi Women in Filmmaking’s educational programs. A team of veteran filmmakers guided the graduates along the production of the six short films. “We envisioned the series as an intergenerational project, where we put our active women filmmakers to work, documenting the stories of veterans of the field, while mentoring and training the next generation of Hawaiʻi women filmmakers,” Zambonelli said.

 

Reel Wāhine of Hawaiʻi producer Shirley Thompson sums up the importance of showcasing the stories of these and other women filmmakers. “[They] aren’t getting the same opportunities as men, in terms of hiring, pay, access to financing and access to gatekeepers,” she said. “Film is a powerful medium that shapes our very society. If we exclude women from writing those stories, or deciding which stories get told, we are excluding women’s voices from shaping our society and our future.”

 

 

 

Blood Sugar Rising

 

Diabetes is an epidemic that affects 100 million Americans, costing over $350 billion annually. Explore the history and science of this hidden crisis and meet some of the faces behind the statistics whose stories bring insights and hope.

 

 

 

REEL WĀHINE OF HAWAIʻI

Cover story by Liberty Peralta, PBS Hawaiʻi

 

REEL WĀHINE OF HAWAIʻI: On the cover, clockwise from top left: Connie Flores, Heather Haunani Giugni, Jeannette Paulson Hereniko, Ciara Leina‘ala Lacy, Victoria Keith and Anne Misawa

 

Since the rise of the #MeToo movement in 2017, a spotlight on gender inequity in the historically male-dominated film industry has been shining brighter than ever. In April, PBS Hawaiʻi shines a local spotlight on our Islands’ own women filmmakers with a month-long presentation of their stories.

 

The presentation is anchored by the statewide broadcast premiere of PBS Hawaiʻi Presents: Reel Wāhine of Hawaiʻi on Thursday, April 30 at 9:00 pm. The hour-long compilation of six locally produced short films tells the stories of these Hawaiʻi-based filmmakers, taking them from behind the camera to out in front:

REEL WĀHINE OF HAWAIʻI Begins Thursday, April 30 at 9:00 pm. This presentation is sponsored by Waimea Valley, Hawaiian Airlines, DUNKIN' and PASHA HAWAII
CONNIE M. FLOREZ
Founder, Hula Girl Productions

 

HEATHER HAUNANI GIUGNI
Producer, Family Ingredients
Founder, ʻUluʻulu: The Henry Kuʻualoha Giugni
Moving Image Archive of Hawaiʻi

 

VICTORIA KEITH
Producer/camera operator, The Sand Island Story

 

CIARA LEINA‘ALA LACY
Writer/producer/director, Out of State

 

ANNE MISAWA
Director/cinematographer/producer
Associate Professor, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa-
Academy for Creative Media

 

JEANNETTE PAULSON HERENIKO
Founding Director, Hawaiʻi International Film Festival

The six short films recount each woman’s creative philosophies, challenges and triumphs in contributing to Hawaiʻi’s film industry.

 

The shorts are produced by Hawaiʻi Women in Filmmaking, a nonprofit organization with a mission to redress gender inequity in the film industry. The organization’s executive director, Vera Zambonelli, directed the short film on Paulson Hereniko.

 

Anne Misawa, Jeanette Paulson Hereniko and Connie M. Florez

 

“In Hawaiʻi, we have a strong history of women behind the camera, including Native Hawaiians and women of color,” Zambonelli said. “Most of them have never told their stories before, and their accomplishments are great. We need to research, record and disseminate this knowledge to counter the ways that academic and cultural histories regularly neglect women’s authorship and work in film and in the arts in general.”

 

The series was also a training opportunity for young graduates of Hawaiʻi Women in Filmmaking’s educational programs. A team of veteran filmmakers guided the graduates along the production of the six short films. “We envisioned the series as an intergenerational project, where we put our active women filmmakers to work, documenting the stories of veterans of the field, while mentoring and training the next generation of Hawaiʻi women filmmakers,” Zambonelli said.

 

Victoria Keith, Hether Haunani Giugni and Ciara Leinaʻala Lacy

 

Reel Wāhine of Hawaiʻi producer Shirley Thompson sums up the importance of showcasing the stories of these and other women filmmakers. “[They] aren’t getting the same opportunities as men, in terms of hiring, pay, access to financing and access to gatekeepers,” she said. “Film is a powerful medium that shapes our very society. If we exclude women from writing those stories, or deciding which stories get told, we are excluding women’s voices from shaping our society and our future.”

 

As part of our month-long celebration of Hawaiʻi women filmmakers, PBS Hawaiʻi will air these encore presentations:

 

PBS HAWAIʻI PRESENTS

Kū Kanaka/Stand Tall
Directed and produced by Marlene Booth
Thursday, April 2, 9:00 pm


LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX

Heather Haunani Giugni
Tuesday, April 7, 7:30 pm


PBS HAWAIʻI PRESENTS

Under a Jarvis Moon
Co-directed and co-produced by Heather Haunani Giugni
Thursday, April 9, 9:00 pm


LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX

Ciara Leina‘ala Lacy
Tuesday, April 14, 7:30 pm


PBS HAWAIʻI PRESENTS

Out of State
Directed and co-produced by Ciara Leinaʻala Lacy
Thursday, April 16, 9:00 pm


PBS HAWAIʻI PRESENTS

Strange Land: My Mother’s War Bride Story
Directed by Stephanie Castillo
Thursday, April 23, 9:00 pm


LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX

Jeannette Paulson Hereniko
Tuesday, April 28, 7:30 pm


 

 

 

KEN BURNS:
Country Music

COUNTRY MUSIC: A Film by Ken Burns

 

Learn about the making of the epic documentary series devoted to the history of this truly American art form. Features interviews with Ken Burns, Rosanne Cash and members of the filmmaking team.

 

 

 

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG
Ahumanu

 

We’re proud to present a brand-new episode of NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG featuring the all-wāhine Hawaiian music trio Ahumanu, from Maui. Members Kekai Robinson, Marja Lehua Apisaloma and Liz Morales say their work in the community outside the entertainment realm brings to their music a dimension of authenticity, service and responsibility. The trio, whose name translates to “a gathering of birds,” performs songs including “E ʻAno ʻAno Ē” and “Kahi Aloha.” Guitarist Josh Kahula and steel guitarist Casey Olsen are also featured, with Leinaʻala Kuloloio Vedder providing hula accompaniment.

 

 

 

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