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INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I ELECTION 2018 SHOW ARCHIVE

 

Playlist of all shows to date. Click the upper left hand icon in the video embed to select a specific show.


 

Links to all shows starting with the most recent
You may also view a show by going to its page. The description of the show and the guests who have attended is also provided.


PRIMARY ELECTION


 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I: Election 2018 Recap
Election 2018 Recap
  Broadcast date: November 8

 

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I: U.S. Senate/Maui County Council – Kahului
U.S. Senate / Maui County Council – Kahului
  Broadcast date: November 1

 

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I: State House District 36 / Hawai‘i County Council District 7
State House District 36 / Hawai‘i County Council District 7
  Broadcast date: October 18

 

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I: OHA At-Large
OHA At-Large
  Broadcast date: October 11

 

 

 

 


Honolulu City Council, District 4, Honolulu City Council, District 8
  Broadcast date: October 4

 

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I: Maui County Mayor, Kaua‘i County Mayor
Maui County Mayor, Kaua‘i County Mayor
  Broadcast date: September 27

 

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I: Governor
Governor
  Broadcast date: September 20

 

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I: U.S. House District 1
U.S. House District 1
  Broadcast date: August 30

 

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I: Constitutional Convention / Taxing Investment Property for Education
Constitutional Convention / Taxing Investment Property for Education
  Broadcast date: August 16

 

 

 

 

Democratic Primary for State Senate District 3, Maui County Council - West Maui
Democratic Primary for State Senate District 3, Maui County Council – West Maui
  Broadcast date: August 9

 

 

 

 

Democratic Primary for U.S. House District 1
Democratic Primary for U.S. House District 1
  Broadcast date: August 2

 

 

 

 

Senate District 6, Senate District 24, Republican Primary for Governor
Senate District 6, Senate District 24, Republican Primary for Governor
  Broadcast date: July 26

 

 

 

 

Maui Mayor | Kaua‘i Mayor
Maui Mayor | Kaua‘i Mayor
  Broadcast date: July 19

Additional Candidates Information, July 19 Broadcast

 

 

 

 

State Senate District 23 | Honolulu City Council District VI
State Senate District 23 | Honolulu City Council District VI
  Broadcast date: July 12

 

 

 

 

Democratic candidates for Governor David Ige and Colleen Hanabusa.
Democratic Primary for Governor
  Broadcast date: July 5

Additional Candidates Information, July 5 Broadcast

 

 

 

 

Election 2018 Preview
Election 2018 Preview
  Broadcast date: May 10

 

 

 


Visit our Insights on PBS Hawai‘i home page   |   Learn more about our Election Policy   |   Visit PBS.org for all archived shows


NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG
Mahi Beamer, Nina Kealiiwahamana and Robert Cazimero

NA MELE: Mahi Beamer, In Memoriam, Mahi Beamer, Nina Kealiiwahamana and Robert Cazimero

 

Three magical talents, Mahi Beamer, Nina Kealiiwahamana and Robert Cazimero, blend their voices together to create an intimacy that only comes with the melding of family and good friends in this encore presentation of a vintage NA MELE episode from the PBS Hawai‘i studios.

 

 

 

NOVA
Kīlauea: Hawaiʻi on Fire

NOVA - Kīlauea: Hawaiʻi on Fire

 

Thousands of Hawai‘i Island residents were uprooted in 2018 when Kīlauea erupted, sending rivers of lava through communities and into the ocean. This spike in Kīlauea’s activity transformed parts of the island into an inferno, spewing rock and causing massive destruction. Join scientists and locals as they head underground to investigate the geological cause of the eruption.

 

Preview

 

 

 

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG
Hūʻewa

NA MELE: Hū‘ewa

 

When you hear their name, you can’t help but smile. The young trio Hū‘ewa is comprised of Kupu Dalire-Na‘auao, Kekoa Kane and Kahi Lum-Young.

 

“‘Hū’ is to hum or to make sound, to make music. And ‘ewa’ is to go off course or to find your own path,” explained Hū‘ewa member Kane. “…that’s what we do with our music…we make music on our own path, on a different style.”

 

Preview

 

The trio performs songs including “Kaulana Ni‘ihau,” where they’re accompanied by the dancers of Hālau Ka Liko Pua O Kalaniakea; and a medley consisting of favorite songs of each member: “Kaulana Moloka‘i,” “Pauoa Liko Ka Lehua” and “Meleana Ē.” Dalire-Na‘auao explains, “The Hawaiian music that we chose, the type of songs that we chose…we just like to pull things from back in the day.”

 

 

 

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG
More! Ledward Kaapana and Family

 

Ledward Kaapana remembers his Uncle Fred Punahoa playing the song “Radio Hula” in Kalapana: “In the morning, like one, two o’clock in the morning. In Kalapana, it’s so quiet, so… you know, and it’s dark, and so, he used to just sit outside on the porch, and play his guitar. I don’t know if you ever experienced sleeping…and hear one guitar just playing sweet music that just wake you up and like, ‘Oh, so sweet,’” Kaapana remembers. “Radio Hula” is one of the songs that Ledward Kaapana, along with his sisters Lehua Nash, Rhoda Kekona, and Lei Aken play in his Kaneohe garage on a rainy evening. They also share an energetic slack key performance of “Kuu Ipo Onaona,” and Ledward honors the late Dennis Kamakahi with “Kokee.”

 

 

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG
Peter Medeiros

NA MELE Peter Medeiros

 

Slack key artist Peter Medeiros, accompanied by guitarist Josh Silva and bass player Nate Stillman, presents a fun evening of traditional slack key. Joining the trio are the dancers of Pua Ali‘i ‘Ilima, led by kumu hula Vicky and Jeff Kānekaiwilani Takamine. Songs performed include “Ulili E,” “He‘eia,” “Ke Ala O Ka Rose” and “Kananaka.”

 

 

 

Hula as a Bedrock of 21st-Century Success

 

CEO Message

 

Hula as a Bedrock of 21st-Century Success

 

This month, the renowned musical Lim Family of Kohala on the Big Island takes the stage on Nā Mele: Traditions in Hawaiian Song (Mon., Jan. 28, 7:30 pm). We at PBS Hawai‘i have wanted to feature this remarkable ‘ohana for years.

 

However, it’s not easy to catch the family members in one place for long! They’re often in different parts of the Islands, and in farflung countries, in versatile groups, performing and teaching. Ed Yap, a family musician and husband of fellow performer and kumu hula Nani Lim Yap, is known for his flying fingers, booking and re-booking airline tickets online as plans evolve.

 

As I interviewed Nani for an upcoming episode of Long Story Short (Tues., Jan. 22, 7:30 pm), I saw once again, with another Island family, that the tradition of hula can serve as a bedrock for modern business success. Nani has long been in demand as a hula teacher in Japan and now, China, for her deep knowledge of this ancient art.

 

“(Hula) is about the collective, and it is about recognizing that together, we produce something that is amazing.” – Ulalia Woodside, Executive Director, Nature Conservancy of Hawai‘i

 

Nani and Ed’s son Manaola Yap, appearing in a Long Story Short encore (Tues., Jan. 15, 7:30 pm) is a young fashion designer and business owner with national and international credentials. “My background in design, and everything I do, comes from hula,” he says.

 

A dancer performing HulaAs a child, he helped his mother stage hula dramas for hotel visitors, creating costumes that helped tell the stories. For a dance honoring Pele, the fire goddess, he says Nani burned all of the edges of the dancers’ fabric “to a crisp.”

 

Successful father-and-son designers and hula practitioners Sig and Kuha‘o Zane of Hilo, Hawai‘i Island, also credit hula with inspiring and sustaining their aloha shirt business. For Sig, it started decades ago with wanting to make a special gift to court his future wife, seventh-generation kumu hula Nālani Kanaka‘ole. Sig learned silk screening and created plant designs, because in hula, many plant forms are important. Like Manaola, he had no formal design or business training.

 

Ulalia Woodside, Executive Director of the Nature Conservancy of Hawai‘i, oversees 40,000 acres of preservation lands. She grew up in Waimānalo, Windward O‘ahu, learning the discipline and interconnectedness of the hula tradition. She says it forged her view of how to live life and how to carry out her work.

 

“(Hula) is about the collective,” she says, “it is about recognizing that together, we produce something that is amazing.”

 

Season’s Aloha

Leslie signature


 

 

 

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG
The Royal Hawaiian Band

NA MELE Royal Hawaiian Band

 

Founded in 1836 by King Kamehameha III, the Royal Hawaiian Band has
provided audiences the world over with a continual connection to Hawai‘i’s
royal heritage. During this vintage concert set on the grounds of historic
Iolani Palace, Bandmaster Aaron Mahi pays tribute to one of his predecessors,
Henry Berger, Royal Hawaiian Bandmaster from 1871 to 1915 and sometimes called
the “Father of Hawaiian music.”

 

 

NĀ MELE
George Winston (Plays Slack Key)

NĀ MELE  George Winston (Plays Slack Key)

 

This vintage episode presents a rare solo slack key concert with George Winston, best known the world over for his evocative piano music, musical interpretations of the ever-changing seasons of his childhood Montana home. But ki ho‘alu, slack key guitar music, has been his passion for many years. In this NĀ MELE classic, Winston performs his “Montana-ized” versions of such slack key classics as: “Sweet Lei Mamo” by Charles Hopkins; “None Hula” by Lena Machado; and Leonard Kwan’s “Nahe Nahe.”

 

 

 

NĀ MELE
Kawai Cockett and Darlene Ahuna

NĀ MELE Kawai Cockett and Darlene Ahuna

 

NĀ MELE features the traditional Hawaiian music of Darlene Ahuna and the late Kawai Cockett. In this vintage performance, Kawai Cockett is backed by Sam Sepitmo and Charlie Wahineho‘okae. Joining Darlene Ahuna are her husband J.J. Ahuna and Led Kaapana. Ha‘aheo Cockett provides hula artistry.

 

 

 

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