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INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Kahauiki Village

 

Faced with the highest rate of homelessness in the nation, Hawai‘i needs new, bold ideas to solve the state’s homeless crisis. One breakthrough vision was inspired by a specific lifestyle with deep roots in Hawai‘i’s history – and one business leader’s personal memories of growing up during that era. It took a public/private partnership unlike any other in the country to make Kahauiki Village a reality.

 

Join us during our live discussion by phoning in, or leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also live streamed on pbshawaii.org and Facebook Live.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
How Does The Local Homeless Population Affect Businesses?

 

In his 2018 State of the City address, Mayor Kirk Caldwell announced his plan to introduce a bill to take back O‘ahu’s sidewalks to clear the way for their intended use – for pedestrians. Do you agree with this move? And in some areas where the homeless population is most visible, how much impact does their presence have on stores and restaurants?

 

Join us during our live discussion by phoning in, or leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also live streamed on pbshawaii.org and Facebook Live.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 


INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Has Hawai‘i Turned a Corner in the Homeless Crisis?

 

INSIGHTS returns with an examination of the State’s homeless plan. How do we measure its effectiveness, and what pending legislation could serve as the breakthrough Hawai‘i needs? According to the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness, Hawai‘i still has the highest per capita population of homeless in the country. However, the council’s Western Regional Coordinator, Katy Miller, says “things have started to gel” in the Islands. What do you think? Has Hawai‘i turned a corner in the homeless crisis?

 

Join us during our live discussion by phoning in, or leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also live streamed on pbshawaii.org and Facebook Live.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 


Different Strokes in Our Hawai‘i Canoe

 

CEO Message

Different Strokes in Our Hawai‘i Canoe

Participants at KĀKOU - Hawai‘iʻs Town Hall: Solomon Alfapada

Solomon AlfapadaTop row: Jim Dooley, Ulalia Woodside, Sean-Joseph Choo, Tracy Alambatin, Shayne Shibuya.
Bottom row: Denby Fawcett, Ryan Ozawa, Burt Lum, Ku‘uipo Kumukahi

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEOWas it an “Only in Hawai‘i” phenomenon?

 

Before the red camera lights signaled the start of last month’s two-hour live KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall, our studio chief Jason Suapaia asked the 70 participants with diverse perspectives to “keep the discussion civil.”

 

He needn’t have worried. The discussion was interesting and it got lively, but as it turns out, the participants had a higher standard than civil. They were polite and even generous.

 

As participant Donne Dawson said afterward, “I deliberately did not raise my hand a second time even though I had lots more to say because I wanted more of the diverse group to weigh in.”

 

PBS Hawai‘i named our new Town Hall program KĀKOU because it means “all of us,” as in: All of us in these isolated islands – no matter how different – are in the same canoe. The question up for discussion: “Have you fact-checked your truth?”

 

In reflecting upon the experience, PBS Hawai‘i Board Member Aaron Salā wrote: “Probably nowhere else in the world would you get so many different kinds, and colors, of people in the same room at the same time to discuss a series of rather intimate thoughts and beliefs. Only in Hawai‘i…”

 

He harkened back to plantation times and the exorbitantly long, hard work days.

 

“That drive to survive caused us to figure out how to live together and rather than feign color-blindness (a concept that continues to baffle me), we celebrate a color-consciousness that helps us to really see each other,” Aaron said.

 

“So,” he continued, “we started this process in survival mode and, in many ways, we still choose to negotiate our peace every day because we know that we must survive. In a sense, we are the American dream come true.” And yet, he believes, “we are probably also the most outwardly racist community in the world.”

 

Participant Burt Lum, co-host of Hawai‘i Public Radio’s Bytemarks Café, was among several people who went home and kept wrestling with the topic of the discussion, about the idea of truth vs. reality.

 

He pictured a stadium full of people.

 

“There is some degree of shared reality, like the fact that you are all watching a football game,” Burt wrote me. “But for the most part everyone there has their own sense of reality, a result of inherent being, accumulated experiences and moral compass.”

 

Two hours on live TV and live streaming flew by. As we signed off, I thought how glad I am to be in the same canoe with these fellow Islanders who can directly address their differences, don’t pretend to have all of the answers, and actually listen to each other.

 

A hui hou (until next time),

 

Leslie signature

Leslie Wilcox
President and CEO
PBS Hawai‘i

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Aftermath of Hawai‘i’s Worst High-Rise Fire

 

The Marco Polo high-rise fire in July claimed four lives and caused more than $100 million in property damage. It also amplified discussion about sprinkler systems and other safety issues for Hawai‘i’s thousands of condominium dwellers. Will there be mandatory safety upgrades for older high-rise properties? Did the controversy surrounding the investigations prevent us from learning how this could have been prevented? We follow up on the aftermath of Hawai‘i’s worst high-rise fire.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and online via Facebook and Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 


INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
The Airbnb-ing of Hawai‘i

 

Short-term vacation rental companies like Airbnb are changing the tourism industry – and quite possibly your neighborhood. Opponents of this phenomenon say illegal or “underground” vacation rentals drive up housing prices and change the character of neighborhoods. Airbnb proponents say it has stabilized Hawai‘i’s housing market. Local data indicates 19 percent of homeowners partner with Airbnb to avoid foreclosure, and 60-65 percent participate so they can afford to stay in their homes. Differing perspectives on this issue will be heard on this INSIGHTS, televised live, and live streamed on pbshawaii.org and Facebook.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 


INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Quiet Title

 

Mark Zuckerberg’s lawsuits to force the sale of kama‘aina lands may have been withdrawn, but it serves as a reminder that land acquisition through quiet title is still a distressful issue for local families who have inherited ownership of family lands. How frequently is quiet title used in local land disputes? And are Native Hawaiians still being alienated from their traditional land?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 




INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Have We Changed?

 

The 2016 Presidential Election will be remembered for many things. The ongoing rancor that drove the energy of this election may be a force that’s here to stay.

 

What about us? Has the meanness movement reach our shores? Locally, issues like rail, homelessness and GMOs have created disagreement and division among Hawai‘i people. Real tension among families and friends. Dissent between island communities.

 

Our own political campaigns have become meaner and increasingly negative. Voter apathy is attributed to a loss of confidence and trust in our leadership and the political process.

 

Have we changed?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 


PBS NEWSHOUR AND NPR
DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION COVERAGE: Day 1

PBS DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION COVERAGE: A NewsHour Special Report, Day 1

 

Day 1
Tune in for live coverage of the 2016 Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. PBS NewsHour and NPR join forces, marking the first time the two public media organizations are collaborating on convention coverage. Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff­ will co-anchor. NPR host Rachel Martin will be reporting from inside the hall with the NewsHour’s Lisa Desjardins and John Yang and NPR’s Sue Davis. They will also be joined by NPR’s Mara Liaisson, Ron Elving and Domenico Montenaro, as well as NewsHour regular contributors, including syndicated columnist Mark Shields, New York Times columnist David Brooks and Cook Political Report’s Amy Walter. Coverage will extend online and on social media to include live streaming of stage speeches and floor interviews.

 

Original live broadcast at 2:00 pm

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