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INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
Hiker Rescue Fines

 

The number of mountain rescues statewide continues to grow every year, with rescues on Oʻahu nearly tripling over a 10-year span ending in 2016. Emergency rescue squads are often called upon to rescue people who are trespassing on public property. Should the government charge these lawbreakers for the rescue service? Join us for a conversation on proposed Hiker Rescue Fines on the next INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
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Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

FRONTLINE
Marcos Doesn’t Live Here Anymore

FRONTLINE: Marcos Doesn’t Live Here Anymore

 

Marcos Doesn’t Live Here Anymore examines the US immigration system through the eyes of two unforgettable protagonists whose lives reveal the human cost of deportation.

 

Preview

 

 

 

Island Soldier

Island Soldier

 

Follow the Nena family as they grieve the loss of their son – his death in Afghanistan makes waves through the community where nearly everyone is connected to the U.S. military. Known as a “recruiter’s paradise,” Micronesia contributes a disproportionate number of soldiers to the armed forces, who cannot receive benefits…yet young men leave their families behind in pursuit of the American Dream.

 

Preview

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
2019 Legislature Preview

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I: 2019 Legislature Preview

 

The New Year brings a new session of the Hawai‘i State Legislature. What are the biggest issues facing lawmakers this year? What are the priorities? How much will lawmakers spend in the continuing battles to reduce homelessness and fix public schools? What will they do to reduce the cost of owning a home and improve the overall quality of life for Hawai‘i residents?

 

Program

 

Join us during these live forums by phoning in or by leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also live streamed on pbshawaii.org and PBS Hawaiʻi’s Facebook page.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Kahauiki Village

 

Faced with the highest rate of homelessness in the nation, Hawai‘i needs new, bold ideas to solve the state’s homeless crisis. One breakthrough vision was inspired by a specific lifestyle with deep roots in Hawai‘i’s history – and one business leader’s personal memories of growing up during that era. It took a public/private partnership unlike any other in the country to make Kahauiki Village a reality.

 

Join us during our live discussion by phoning in, or leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also live streamed on pbshawaii.org and Facebook Live.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
How Does The Local Homeless Population Affect Businesses?

 

In his 2018 State of the City address, Mayor Kirk Caldwell announced his plan to introduce a bill to take back O‘ahu’s sidewalks to clear the way for their intended use – for pedestrians. Do you agree with this move? And in some areas where the homeless population is most visible, how much impact does their presence have on stores and restaurants?

 

Join us during our live discussion by phoning in, or leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also live streamed on pbshawaii.org and Facebook Live.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 


INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Has Hawai‘i Turned a Corner in the Homeless Crisis?

 

INSIGHTS returns with an examination of the State’s homeless plan. How do we measure its effectiveness, and what pending legislation could serve as the breakthrough Hawai‘i needs? According to the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness, Hawai‘i still has the highest per capita population of homeless in the country. However, the council’s Western Regional Coordinator, Katy Miller, says “things have started to gel” in the Islands. What do you think? Has Hawai‘i turned a corner in the homeless crisis?

 

Join us during our live discussion by phoning in, or leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also live streamed on pbshawaii.org and Facebook Live.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 


Different Strokes in Our Hawai‘i Canoe

 

CEO Message

Different Strokes in Our Hawai‘i Canoe

Participants at KĀKOU - Hawai‘iʻs Town Hall: Solomon Alfapada

Solomon AlfapadaTop row: Jim Dooley, Ulalia Woodside, Sean-Joseph Choo, Tracy Alambatin, Shayne Shibuya.
Bottom row: Denby Fawcett, Ryan Ozawa, Burt Lum, Ku‘uipo Kumukahi

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEOWas it an “Only in Hawai‘i” phenomenon?

 

Before the red camera lights signaled the start of last month’s two-hour live KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall, our studio chief Jason Suapaia asked the 70 participants with diverse perspectives to “keep the discussion civil.”

 

He needn’t have worried. The discussion was interesting and it got lively, but as it turns out, the participants had a higher standard than civil. They were polite and even generous.

 

As participant Donne Dawson said afterward, “I deliberately did not raise my hand a second time even though I had lots more to say because I wanted more of the diverse group to weigh in.”

 

PBS Hawai‘i named our new Town Hall program KĀKOU because it means “all of us,” as in: All of us in these isolated islands – no matter how different – are in the same canoe. The question up for discussion: “Have you fact-checked your truth?”

 

In reflecting upon the experience, PBS Hawai‘i Board Member Aaron Salā wrote: “Probably nowhere else in the world would you get so many different kinds, and colors, of people in the same room at the same time to discuss a series of rather intimate thoughts and beliefs. Only in Hawai‘i…”

 

He harkened back to plantation times and the exorbitantly long, hard work days.

 

“That drive to survive caused us to figure out how to live together and rather than feign color-blindness (a concept that continues to baffle me), we celebrate a color-consciousness that helps us to really see each other,” Aaron said.

 

“So,” he continued, “we started this process in survival mode and, in many ways, we still choose to negotiate our peace every day because we know that we must survive. In a sense, we are the American dream come true.” And yet, he believes, “we are probably also the most outwardly racist community in the world.”

 

Participant Burt Lum, co-host of Hawai‘i Public Radio’s Bytemarks Café, was among several people who went home and kept wrestling with the topic of the discussion, about the idea of truth vs. reality.

 

He pictured a stadium full of people.

 

“There is some degree of shared reality, like the fact that you are all watching a football game,” Burt wrote me. “But for the most part everyone there has their own sense of reality, a result of inherent being, accumulated experiences and moral compass.”

 

Two hours on live TV and live streaming flew by. As we signed off, I thought how glad I am to be in the same canoe with these fellow Islanders who can directly address their differences, don’t pretend to have all of the answers, and actually listen to each other.

 

A hui hou (until next time),

 

Leslie signature

Leslie Wilcox
President and CEO
PBS Hawai‘i

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Aftermath of Hawai‘i’s Worst High-Rise Fire

 

The Marco Polo high-rise fire in July claimed four lives and caused more than $100 million in property damage. It also amplified discussion about sprinkler systems and other safety issues for Hawai‘i’s thousands of condominium dwellers. Will there be mandatory safety upgrades for older high-rise properties? Did the controversy surrounding the investigations prevent us from learning how this could have been prevented? We follow up on the aftermath of Hawai‘i’s worst high-rise fire.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and online via Facebook and Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 


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