Japanese

RUDY MAXA’S WORLD
Kyushu

RUDY MAXA’S WORLD: Kyushu

 

It was still snowing when the Rudy Maxa’s World film crew shot in Japan’s northern island of Hokkaido. But just short flight away, on one of Japan’s most southernmost islands, Kyushu, the cherry blossoms were out and beach goers were burying themselves in the hot sand-heated by the island’s volcanos-on beaches. Host Rudy Maxa and Washington, D.C. restauranteur and chef Daisuke Utagawa introduce many viewers to this lush island with luxurious resorts and a history of providing the world with Wagyu beef, black pork, and other delicacies that have made Japanese cuisine well known around the world.

 

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LUCKY CHOW
Food as Art

LUCKY CHOW: Food as Art

 

Today, what we watch can be just as appetizing as what we eat. From the Korean art of mukbang to viral sensations, artists both amateur and professional are using food as their medium of choice. Being a foodie today is just as likely to happen in a 24/7 Korean spa as it is in a restaurant.

 

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RUDY MAXA’S WORLD:
Hokkaido

RUDY MAXA’S WORLD: Hokkaido

 

The northernmost Japanese island of Hokkaido is the home of the international food favorite, ramen. Known as Japan’s “soul food,” ramen is revered in Hokkaido, where it enjoys a long history. Host Rudy Maxa and Washington, D.C. chef Daisuke Utagawa explore the island that’s a world-class skiing venue-Sapporo, Hokkaido’s capital, which hosted the Winter Olympics in 1972. Along the way, they track down the multi-generational families that produce the ingredients of ramen and visit the island’s stunning lakes; one of the island’s premier ski resorts, as well as a whiskey distillery that helps makes Japan’s award-winning spirits.

 

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NORMAN MINETA AND HIS LEGACY:
AN AMERICAN STORY

NORMAN MINETA AND HIS LEGACY: AN AMERICAN STORY

 

The child of immigrants, Norman Mineta’s uniquely American story charts a path from the shame he experienced as a Japanese American inside a U.S. internment camp during World War II to his triumphant rise to political prominence that has shaped every level of government, and made him one of the most influential Asian Americans in the history of our nation. His distinguished career has been a continuous unmatched slate of firsts, including 20 years in the United States Congress and eventually serving in the cabinets of two presidents from different political parties: Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. Still thriving today in his 80s, he is celebrated as a bipartisan visionary who preached political civility, yet was a bold change-maker with a deft political touch and an inclusive vision of the future.

 

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PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Canefield Songs: Holehole Bushi

PBS HAWAII PRESENTS: Canefield Songs: Holehole Bushi

 

In this new film, Professor of Anthropology Christine Yano explains, “If we want to know something of what some of these womenʻs lives were like…we could do no better than to listen to their own words, as expressed through song.” The women that Professor Yano is referring to are Japanese immigrants who worked in Hawai‘i’s sugarcane fields in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Through their canefield songs, or holehole bushi, these women sang about their joys and sorrows of trying to start life in a new world. Hosted and narrated by ukulele virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro, the film tells the story of music teacher Harry Urata, and his efforts to record, preserve and perpetuate these musical oral histories.

 

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Our American Family:
The Furutas

OUR AMERICAN FAMILY: The Furutas

 

Through hard work, the Furutas, a Japanese American family in Wintersburg, CA established a successful goldfish farm, only to have their business devastated and family separated in the wake of WWII. Following years in an Arizona relocation camp, their indomitable spirit prevails as they return home and band together to pursue the American dream a second time.

 

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RUDY MAXA’S WORLD:
Tokyo

RUDY MAXA’S WORLD: Tokyo

 

Rudy Maxa’s World takes a second look at the vibrant city of Tokyo, this time with an emphasis on Tokyo’s cuisine. “There are more Michelin-starred restaurants in Tokyo than in Paris and New York combined,” notes Washington, D.C. chef and restaurant owner Daisuke Utagawa. “And it’s well known that Japanese chefs are highly regarded around the world. But it’s also the commitment, or the kodawari, of producers of many of the food products those chefs use that helps makes the cuisine what it is.” Utagawa joins show host Rudy Maxa to bring the concept of kodawari to the screen, visiting the producers of the food that’s made Japanese cuisine so famous.

 

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LUCKY CHOW
Trending Japanese

LUCKY CHOW: Trending Japanese

 

LUCKY CHOW returns for a second season with host Danielle Chang, who explores Asian cuisine’s impact on American food culture, while discovering how deeply Asian culture is rooted in our everyday lives.

 

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Trending Japanese
Danielle explores the new wave of Japanese culinary culture, including a visit to New York’s Kaneko Cat Café and a Brooklyn izakaya.

 

 

 

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