Japanese

DINING WITH THE CHEF
Rika’s Omelet Rice

DINING WITH THE CHEF: Rika’s Omelet Rice

 

Discover the basics of Japanese cuisine with professionals. Chef Saito provides easy guidance for making authentic dishes, while Chef Rika gives helpful advice on quick and stylish cuisine.

 

Rika’s Omelet Rice

 

In this episode, we’ll be making omelet rice, deliciously flavored with butter and ketchup, and with a tender, fluffy omelet. This simple recipe for this western-style Japanese dish is made without wrapping the omelet around the rice, for easier preparation. For our side dish, we’ll be using eggplant, a fall ingredient, grilling it and serving it with a miso dressing. The dressing is made with sushi vinegar, giving it a deliciously light and clean flavor. We’ll also learn about how to make a Japanese-style jelly from soymilk and black sesame seeds, for a healthy dessert that makes the most of the mild sweetness of the soymilk and the rich aroma of the sesame seeds.

 

 

 

Lopaka Kapanui
Hawaiʻi’s “Chicken Skin” Storyteller

Cover story by Liberty Peralta, PBS Hawaiʻi

 

Lopaka Kapanui, Hawaiʻi's "Chicken Skin" Storyteller

Years ago, Lopaka Kapanui’s mother told him something he says he was “too young and arrogant” to understand.

 

“A lot of work that we do is not about us,” he says his mom told him. “And if we think it’s based on us, we’re fooling ourselves. It’s about helping other people.”

 

Telling ghost stories may be an unusual way of serving one’s community, but it’s this motivation that drives Kapanui in his work as a storyteller of legends, a mantle he’s taken up since the 2003 passing of his mentor, celebrated Oʻahu “chicken skin” storyteller, Glen Grant.

 

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX: Lopaka Kapanui airs Tuesday, October 29 at 7:30 pm“My job is not just to tell ghost stories and scare people, but also to clear up that misunderstanding of what this is all about, which is really communication,” Kapanui says.

 

Kapanui’s life began in the Honolulu neighborhood of Kalihi, as a malnourished infant living in a station wagon with his mother and four older siblings.

 

“They said I was about the size of a rolled-up newspaper,” Kapanui says.

A family from Waiʻanae adopted the young Kapanui, who continued to battle health issues through his early childhood, to the point where he was hospitalized to flush out his kidneys.

 

My job is not just to tell ghost stories and scare people, but also to clear up that misunderstanding of what this is all about, which is really communication. 

Lopaka Kapanui

 

“I’m a Buddhist, so we believe in karma,” Kapanui says. “I think that somewhere in my past life, I was someone who caused somebody a great deal of suffering and so maybe it was my karma early in my life to go through this.”

 

Kapanui says his childhood home in Waiʻanae was haunted. His first visual experience was when he saw a Japanese boy approach a stand-up oil lamp in the family’s living room and begin licking the oil from it. A Japanese odaisan, or spiritual medium, later advised the family to get rid of the lamp.

 

Kapanui’s lifelong sensitivity to spirits culminated in 1994, when a coworker told him about a Glen Grant ghost tour. “I’m astounded, I’m flabbergasted because the majority of what he was talking about are things I already knew growing up and learned from my mom,” Kapanui says. “But the difference was there was documentation, history and things to back up these claims, so that no one could say, ‘Well, that’s just made-up Hawaiian legends, old wives’ tales.’”

 

So how does Kapanui manage people on his tours who say they don’t believe in the supernatural? “What I always tell them is: Give me a chance to change your mind,” he says. “You don’t have to like it; I would encourage that you at least respect it.”

 


 

PORK ON THE PALI

 

Nuʻuanu Pali It’s a familiar local admonition: don’t bring pork over the Nuʻuanu Pali, the cliff that separates Honolulu and Windward Oʻahu. Lopaka Kapanui breaks down the story behind the story:

 

Legend has it that Pele, the fire goddess, and Kamapuaʻa, the pig demigod, were in a tumultuous relationship. In her rage, Pele unleashed a tidal wave of lava upon Kamapua‘a. After the demigod successfully summoned the rain to hold back the lava, Kamapua‘a and Pele came to an agreement: the lush Windward side of all islands would be Kamapuaʻa’s domain, while the arid Kona sides would belong to Pele. “None shall cross into the other’s territory,” Kapanui explains.

 

So carrying pork from the Windward to the Leeward side of the Nuʻuanu Pali would be symbolically trying to bring Kamapua‘a into Pele’s territory – and Pele won’t have that. “To be more specific, you can bring pork through the H-3, the Wilson and Pali tunnels, but you can’t bring it up that road at the Pali Lookout, that’s coming from the Windward [side] … there’s a road at the Pali Lookout that crosses that meridian.”

 

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 10|24|19:
Archers to Art and Other Stories

 

TOP STORY:

 

“Archers to Art”
Students from Ke Kula Niihau O Kekaha Public Charter School on Kauaʻi tell the story of how members of their school’s archery program created, through a process of problem solving, an activity that produces wildly colorful, spontaneous works of art. Student archers decided to place balloons onto the traditional archery targets with the intent of having the arrows burst the balloons. The wind caused the balloons to move around, so the students filled them with water to anchor them in place. They then decided to add paint to the water, and laid cardboard down to avoid messing up the surrounding area. Noticing the colorful designs the splatters created, they replaced the cardboard with watercolor paper. Thus was created this innovative genre of painting.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

“Waimea’s Rain Rock”
Students from Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy Middle School in the Waimea district of Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a legendary rain rock which was said to have saved Waimea from a devastating drought.

 

“Student Poet”
Students from Kauaʻi High School in Līhuʻe tell the story of a young poet who uses creativity to battle depression.

 

“Jiu Jitsu Preacher”
Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani tell the story of a martial arts school that is also a place of worship.

 

“How to Care for an Abandoned Baby Bird”
Students from Īʻao School on Maui show us how to nurse an abandoned baby bird back to health.

 

“Betty Santoki”
Students from Farrington High School on Oʻahu introduce us to a Class of 1962 Farrington graduate who has dedicated her life to keeping Japanese traditions alive in her community.

 

“Suburbia”
A student at H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui shares her inner-most thoughts about becoming a filmmaker in a personal video essay.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students at Montessori School of Maui in Makawao.

 

 

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Keola Beamer: Mālama Ko Aloha (Keep Your Love)

PBS HAWAII PRESENTS: Keola Beamer: Mālama Ko Aloha (Keep Your Love)

 

This program tells the story of Keola Beamer’s journey through song. The respected composer and slack key guitarist partners with an array of musicians, including Native American flutist R. Carlos Nakai, American jazz pianist Geoffrey Keezer and Hawaiian vocalist Raiatea Helm. These collaborations demonstrate how one can retain cultural identity while openly sharing with others to create something new – a global art form. This multicultural exchange reaches its zenith when Beamer performs a Hawaiian-language version of John Lennon’s “Imagine,” with musicians playing traditional Hawaiian, Chinese, Japanese, Australian, Classical European and American Jazz instruments. In another particularly moving segment, Keola accompanies his wife Moanalani Beamer as she performs a hula as a quadriplegic woman who magically regains use of her limbs in a dream.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
HIKI NŌ Class of 2019, Part Two

 

This is the second of four specials in which outstanding HIKI NŌ graduates from the Class of 2019 (and one student from the Class of 2020) gathered at PBS Hawaiʻi to discuss their HIKI NŌ experiences and how they feel the skills they learned from HIKI NŌ will help them in college, the workplace and life.

 

This episode features Kera Rasavanh, who graduated from McKinley High School in Honolulu and is now a Business Marketing and Digital Cinema major at UH Mānoa; Drake Dela Cruz, who graduated from Farrington High School in Honolulu and is now a Film and TV Production major at Leeward Community College on Oʻahu; and Serene Morales, who graduated from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui and is now majoring in Digital Cinema at UH Mānoa.

 

Each graduate also shows a HIKI NŌ story that they worked on and discusses what they learned from the experience of working on that particular story. Kera shares her story “Hawaii Nature Center,” about an ʻāina-based education center in Makiki, Oʻahu that teaches elementary and middle school children how to care for the environment. Drake shows “Betty Santoki,” about a 1962 Farrington graduate who has dedicated her life to keeping Japanese culture alive in her community. Serene presents her story “Justin Yanagida,” about a Maui-based fitness coach who uses struggles from his own past to motivate others to turn their lives around.

 

 

 

Silent Sacrifice:
Stories of Japanese American Incarceration

Silent Sacrifice: Stories of Japanese American Incarceration

 

Silent Sacrifice: Stories of Japanese American Incarceration is a two-hour documentary film that will shed light on the ramifications of Executive Order 9066. This landmark film shares the experience of Japanese Americans before, during and after WWII with a focus on the Merced, Tulare, Fresno and Pinedale Assembly Centers.

 

Preview

 

 

 

DINING WITH THE CHEF
Artisan Edition in Akita: Kiritampo-Nabe (Rice Stick Hot Pot)

DINING WITH THE CHEF - Artisan Edition in Akita: Kiritampo-Nabe (Rice Stick Hot Pot)

 

We’ll be visiting the far northern prefecture of Akita and learning about Akita’s local cooking over two episodes. In the first episode, we’ll learn about Kiritampo-nabe, a hotpot dish once cooked by the Matagi, hunters who lived in the mountains. This hotpot contains local Hinai chicken, seri, maitake mushrooms, burdock root, and kiritampo, the item that gives the dish its name. Made by mashing rice, then spreading it on a stick and grilling it, kiritampo are perfect for soaking up the rich flavor of the Hinai chicken soup. We’ll also learn about Akita’s unique food culture, full of the flavors of nature.

 

 

 

RUDY MAXA’S WORLD
Kyushu

RUDY MAXA’S WORLD: Kyushu

 

It was still snowing when the Rudy Maxa’s World film crew shot in Japan’s northern island of Hokkaido. But just short flight away, on one of Japan’s most southernmost islands, Kyushu, the cherry blossoms were out and beach goers were burying themselves in the hot sand-heated by the island’s volcanos-on beaches. Host Rudy Maxa and Washington, D.C. restauranteur and chef Daisuke Utagawa introduce many viewers to this lush island with luxurious resorts and a history of providing the world with Wagyu beef, black pork, and other delicacies that have made Japanese cuisine well known around the world.

 

Preview

 

 

 

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