Japanese

PBS HAWAIʻI PRESENTS
Keola Beamer: Mālama Ko Aloha (Keep Your Love)

PBS HAWAII PRESENTS: Keola Beamer: Mālama Ko Aloha (Keep Your Love)

 

This program tells the story of Keola Beamer’s journey through song. The respected composer and slack key guitarist partners with an array of musicians, including Native American flutist R. Carlos Nakai, American jazz pianist Geoffrey Keezer and Hawaiian vocalist Raiatea Helm. These collaborations demonstrate how one can retain cultural identity while openly sharing with others to create something new – a global art form. This multicultural exchange reaches its zenith when Beamer performs a Hawaiian-language version of John Lennon’s “Imagine,” with musicians playing traditional Hawaiian, Chinese, Japanese, Australian, Classical European and American Jazz instruments. In another particularly moving segment, Keola accompanies his wife Moanalani Beamer as she performs a hula as a quadriplegic woman who magically regains use of her limbs in a dream.

 

 

 

DINING WITH THE CHEF
Marinated Swordfish

 

DINING WITH THE CHEF introduces Americans to the techniques, ingredients and harmony of Japanese cuisine. Hosted by Yu Hayami, who cooks alongside master chef Tatsuo Saito, and also by Patrick Harlan who cooks with chef Rika Yukimasa — and with occasional appearances by other guest chefs — the series presents delicious Japanese dishes that can be made at home.

 

Marinated Swordfish
In this episode, we’ll be making nanban-zuke marinated swordfish with some heat from a chili pepper, the perfect dish for appetites lost to the hot summer days. Chef Saito will be using bell peppers, onion, basil, and more for a beautiful and delicious dish, and he’ll also show the tricks to getting the best flavor out of vegetables. For our side, we’ll be making braised dried daikon radish. With its sweet and savory flavor and a sprinkle of toasted sesame seeds, it makes the perfect accompaniment, rounding out the meal alongside rice, miso soup, and freshly pickled vegetables.

 

 

 

DINING WITH THE CHEF
Japanese-Style Fried Meatballs

DINING WITH THE CHEF: Japanese-Style Fried Meatballs

 

In this episode, we’ll be making Japanese-style fried meatballs. Rika’s mother taught her this unique recipe, where instead of stewing them, the meatballs are fried. By pre-heating onions in the microwave, their flavor can be integrated into the meat more easily. To add seasoning, we’ll be using soy sauce, ginger, and nutmeg, to give the flavor plenty of complexity. We’ll also be focusing on side dish soups made with ginger, and showing a simple recipe for one of the many different Japanese dishes made with ginger.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 3|5|20: 2020 Winter Challenge High School Division | Program

 

This special edition features stories from the High School Division of the 2020 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge. On January 31, 2020, participating elementary, middle school and high school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the prompt: “The wisdom of elders brought to life by the young.” Teachers could not provide hands-on help. The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own. The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

1.) How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?

2.) How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?

3.) How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, First-Place, Second-Place, Third-Place, and Honorable Mention awards were given in both the middle school and high school divisions. The following High School Division awardees will be featured in this special:

 

–First Place in the High School Division:

 

“The Show Goes On”
The challenge team from Maui High School tells the story of a dance instructor whose love for the art form inspires generations of passionate dancers to continue the cycle of knowledge and inspiration.

 

HIKI NŌ 3|5|20: 2020 Winter Challenge High School Division | Program

 

–Second Place in the High School Division:

 

“Major Advice”
The challenge team from Waimea High School on Kauaʻi tells the story of a retired Army major who empowers generations of JROTC cadets to achieve their goals and become leaders by looking out for their welfare and teaching them hallmarks of success.

 

–Third Place in the High School Division:

 

“More Than Just a Language”
The challenge team from Hilo High School on the Big Island tells the story of a high school student who learned more than language and cultural traditions from her Hawaiian language class. Along with the special bond she formed with her teacher and class, she gained morals and values that she wishes to pass on to her younger brother and those after him.

 

–Honorable Mention in the High School Division:

 

”Intergenerational Practices”
The challenge team from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tells the story of a Japanese folk dance teacher and a student whose passion for perpetuating the Japanese tradition makes his family and community members proud.

 

HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge stories from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu and Kauaʻi High School are also featured.

 

“No Cost for Kindness”
The challenge team from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu tells the story of a student who learned respect and kindness at home and practices these lessons at school by helping kids in need.

 

“Mālama Huleʻia: Preserving the Past”
The challenge team from Kauaʻi High School tells the story of a non-profit organization that relies on the wisdom and traditions of elders to connect with the past, revitalize Hawaiian lands, and teach the community youth to take care of the environment for years to come.

 

First-place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Second-place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Third-place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Honorable mention winners will receive $100 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

NORMAN MINETA AND HIS LEGACY:
AN AMERICAN STORY

NORMAN MINETA AND HIS LEGACY: AN AMERICAN STORY

 

The child of immigrants, Norman Mineta’s uniquely American story charts a path from the shame he experienced as a Japanese American inside a U.S. internment camp during World War II to his triumphant rise to political prominence that has shaped every level of government, and made him one of the most influential Asian Americans in the history of our nation. His distinguished career has been a continuous unmatched slate of firsts, including 20 years in the United States Congress and eventually serving in the cabinets of two presidents from different political parties: Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. Still thriving today in his 80s, he is celebrated as a bipartisan visionary who preached political civility, yet was a bold change-maker with a deft political touch and an inclusive vision of the future.

 

Preview

 

 

 

Kimono Revolution

Kimono Revolution

 

In KIMONO REVOLUTION, Yoshimasa Takakura, a kimono shop owner from Fukuoka Prefecture, launches an unprecedented project: to produce elaborate kimonos representing each of the 206 nations recognized by the International Olympic Committee. Takakura’s goal is to see all the country placard bearers at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics dressed in their special kimono at the opening ceremony. Across Japan, kimono sales are down, interest in the cultural tradition has waned, and the weavers, artists and textile experts who guard this traditional craft have dwindled. Takakura is fighting to save the declining kimono industry by calling on artisans across Japan – both established and emerging talents – to come together to create innovative designs. KIMONO REVOLUTION illuminates the painstaking work, technical skill and artistic vision that goes into each kimono, and follows Takakura’s quest to bring new life to an old tradition.

 

 

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Canefield Songs: Holehole Bushi

PBS HAWAII PRESENTS: Canefield Songs: Holehole Bushi

 

In this new film, Professor of Anthropology Christine Yano explains, “If we want to know something of what some of these womenʻs lives were like…we could do no better than to listen to their own words, as expressed through song.” The women that Professor Yano is referring to are Japanese immigrants who worked in Hawai‘i’s sugarcane fields in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Through their canefield songs, or holehole bushi, these women sang about their joys and sorrows of trying to start life in a new world. Hosted and narrated by ukulele virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro, the film tells the story of music teacher Harry Urata, and his efforts to record, preserve and perpetuate these musical oral histories.

 

Preview

 

 

 

Our American Family:
The Furutas

OUR AMERICAN FAMILY: The Furutas

 

Through hard work, the Furutas, a Japanese American family in Wintersburg, CA established a successful goldfish farm, only to have their business devastated and family separated in the wake of WWII. Following years in an Arizona relocation camp, their indomitable spirit prevails as they return home and band together to pursue the American dream a second time.

 

Preview

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 10|24|19:
Archers to Art and Other Stories

 

TOP STORY:

 

“Archers to Art”
Students from Ke Kula Niihau O Kekaha Public Charter School on Kauaʻi tell the story of how members of their school’s archery program created, through a process of problem solving, an activity that produces wildly colorful, spontaneous works of art. Student archers decided to place balloons onto the traditional archery targets with the intent of having the arrows burst the balloons. The wind caused the balloons to move around, so the students filled them with water to anchor them in place. They then decided to add paint to the water, and laid cardboard down to avoid messing up the surrounding area. Noticing the colorful designs the splatters created, they replaced the cardboard with watercolor paper. Thus was created this innovative genre of painting.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

“Waimea’s Rain Rock”
Students from Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy Middle School in the Waimea district of Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a legendary rain rock which was said to have saved Waimea from a devastating drought.

 

“Student Poet”
Students from Kauaʻi High School in Līhuʻe tell the story of a young poet who uses creativity to battle depression.

 

“Jiu Jitsu Preacher”
Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani tell the story of a martial arts school that is also a place of worship.

 

“How to Care for an Abandoned Baby Bird”
Students from Īʻao School on Maui show us how to nurse an abandoned baby bird back to health.

 

“Betty Santoki”
Students from Farrington High School on Oʻahu introduce us to a Class of 1962 Farrington graduate who has dedicated her life to keeping Japanese traditions alive in her community.

 

“Suburbia”
A student at H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui shares her inner-most thoughts about becoming a filmmaker in a personal video essay.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students at Montessori School of Maui in Makawao.

 

 

 

DINING WITH THE CHEF
Rika’s Omelet Rice

DINING WITH THE CHEF: Rika’s Omelet Rice

 

Discover the basics of Japanese cuisine with professionals. Chef Saito provides easy guidance for making authentic dishes, while Chef Rika gives helpful advice on quick and stylish cuisine.

 

Rika’s Omelet Rice

 

In this episode, we’ll be making omelet rice, deliciously flavored with butter and ketchup, and with a tender, fluffy omelet. This simple recipe for this western-style Japanese dish is made without wrapping the omelet around the rice, for easier preparation. For our side dish, we’ll be using eggplant, a fall ingredient, grilling it and serving it with a miso dressing. The dressing is made with sushi vinegar, giving it a deliciously light and clean flavor. We’ll also learn about how to make a Japanese-style jelly from soymilk and black sesame seeds, for a healthy dessert that makes the most of the mild sweetness of the soymilk and the rich aroma of the sesame seeds.

 

 

 

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