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PATRICK SULLIVAN
Professional Problem Solver

By Liberty Peralta, PBS Hawaiʻi

 

Patrick Sullivan, Professional Problem Solver

Inset image, left: Sullivan as a University of Hawai‘i doctoral candidate in Engineering. Genie, right, is an Oceanit robotics and artificial intelligence project with two brains, eyes, ears and a mouth that is capable of tracking faces and specific expressions.

 

Patrick Sullivan Lifelong Problem Solver Tuesday, August 20 at 7:30 pm Professional Problem Solver Tuesday, August 27 at 7:30 pm Both program will be available online at pbshawaii.orgIt seems there’s no problem too big or too small for Patrick Sullivan of Kailua, Windward O‘ahu.

 

He wanted a car, so at age 13, he started working in food service jobs, saved up and bought a car at age 16.

 

He wanted to go to college, so at age 17, he applied for student loans, grants, and work study … and started a landscaping business to earn the money.

 

He visited the Islands during a college break, so to pay for his lodging, he cobbled together home improvement jobs for some people he met on the plane ride to O‘ahu.

 

So it seems natural that Sullivan is now in the business of problem solving. He’s the founder and chairman of Oceanit, a Honolulu-based company that uses science and innovation to create solutions to some of the world’s biggest challenges. One of the many projects that Oceanit is working on is a rapid-response solution to help an elderly person after a fall. Sullivan explains that an “inexpensive but effective robotic assistant” can help save a life.

 

This wall at Oceanit headquarters attracts visitor attention. Inset image: Deep-dive helmets, above, are being redesigned to reduce noise that causes hearing loss while maintaining the ability to communicate.

This wall at Oceanit headquarters attracts visitor attention. Inset image: Deep-dive helmets, above, are being redesigned to reduce noise that causes hearing loss while maintaining the ability to communicate.

 

The name “Oceanit” comes from a Greek and Latin term for “ocean dweller.” It’s an apt description for Sullivan, who gets in the water four to five times a week. It’s a tradition that started when his son Matthew and daughter Tarah were children. “Surfing is a way to reconnect to the world,” he says.

 

As Sullivan explains it, “Oceanit” is also an apt company name. “The ocean is a teacher in so many ways,” he says. “It covers everything from physics, chemistry, biology, hydromechanics, so [the ocean] is probably the biggest mashup of all science.”

 

Oceanit employs about 160 scientists and engineers and has raised more than $475 million in research and development funds. Its national and international client list includes governments, universities, organizations and businesses.

 

It’s no accident that Oceanit is based in Hawai‘i, and Sullivan credits it as a strength. “Innovation comes from differences, not sameness,” he says. “I think in the culture of Hawai‘i is innovation. The Native Hawaiians that came to Hawai‘i, they innovated to get here, and they innovated when they got here. They were not afraid of technology, afraid of change; they embraced it.”

 

Sullivan is familiar with constant change. Born in California, Sullivan spent his early years in Los Angeles. His family moved to Seattle after his father Thomas was hired as an aircraft mechanic for Boeing, a job that would end during a mass layoff. Sullivan’s family then moved multiple times to Texas, Wyoming and Arizona, before settling down in Colorado.

 

“I went to four different high schools, which brings its own challenges,” Sullivan says. “[My parents] tried to keep everything together, but it was just really hard.”

 

His parents, whose families moved West after the Great Depression, lacked the means to pursue an education, and had five children to care for. “That’s why an education was so important [to me],” he says.

 

With the rapid pace of technology replacing lowerwage service jobs, Sullivan underscores the importance of education.

 

“Adults need to consider lifelong learning,” he says. “That needs to be part of the culture, where we get comfortable with that, and it needs to be more available and affordable.”

 

Sullivan stresses that getting an education for the sake of education isn’t the point, but to build one’s “durability” as industries continue to evolve. It’s the kind of durability that’s helped Sullivan navigate change and tackle life’s challenges.

 

And with the business of problem solving, it seems there’s no end in sight.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Quality of Life on Kaua‘i

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I presents a series exploring the quality of life on each island, with residents from each island driving the conversations. What issues matter most to each island? These episodes are a precursor to our upcoming Election 2018 coverage. Our first discussion explores the issues most important to the residents of Kaua‘i.

 

Join us during our live discussion by phoning in, or leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also live streamed on pbshawaii.org and Facebook Live.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 


PBS NewsHour
State of the Union Address

 

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump will deliver his annual State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress on Jan. 30.

 

Join us on Tuesday, January 30th at 4:00 pm for PBS NewsHour’s coverage of President Trump’s State of the Union Address, the Democratic party’s response, and in-depth analysis from the PBS NewsHour team.

 

The Democratic response can be viewed below.

 

 



Most Likely to Succeed

 

Most Likely to Succeed examines the history of education in the United States and reveals the shortcomings of conventional education in today’s modern world. The documentary also follows students at High Tech High, a network of San Diego charter schools that promotes hands-on, project-based learning, with the goal of producing real-world workforce and life skills.

 




INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Retain & Recruit

 

Hawai‘i is now at “full employment,” meaning our statewide, adjusted unemployment rate has fallen below 3 percent. In this tight job market, local and national businesses, big and small, are competing for the most qualified employees. While the gap widens between Hawai‘i’s high cost of living and the average salary scale, how can Hawai‘i workers take advantage of this situation – and how can local companies get creative with attracting qualified job candidates?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 





INDEPENDENT LENS
The Prison in Twelve Landscapes

 

In the United States, there are over 2 million people in prison, up from only 300,000 40 years ago. Yet for most Americans, prisons have never felt more distant or more out of sight. A cinematic journey through a series of seemingly ordinary American landscapes, this film reveals the hidden world of the modern prison system and explores lives outside the gates affected by prisons.

 

FRONTLINE
Politics, Poverty and Profit

 

This episode examines the politics, profits and problems of an affordable housing system in crisis. Investigate the billions spent on housing the poor and why so few get the help they need.

 

Students at PBS Hawai‘i

The following position is currently open:

Student Production Technician – Part-time

 

In line with our educational mission, PBS Hawai‘i offers a training program for college students to gain valuable experience in the media industry. We offer student positions in media production, marketing/communications and graphic design.

 

College students have always been the backbone of PBS Hawai‘i’s production crew. Many of them have gone on to successful media careers. See some of their stories here!

 

 

 

 


Below are our available student positions:

Student Production Technician – Part-time

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The part-time Student Production Technician is an entry-level position within PBS Hawaiʻi’s Content department. Training includes operating video cameras, video switcher, audio equipment, character generator, still store, teleprompter, floor directing, and assembling/lighting sets. Occasional field shoots required. Other duties include carrying equipment and set pieces (sometimes heavy), working atop 13-foot ladders, and driving company vehicles. Must be able to lift 40 lbs. and have a clean drivers abstract. Hours vary weekly between 4–19 hours, depending on production schedules. Good availability on weekends and evenings a plus. Availability for weekly Thursday evening productions a must. Looking for applicants who can make a commitment of at least one year.

 

No experience necessary. Starting pay is $10.10 per hour. This position reports directly to the Production Manager, but will also work under the leadership of any senior staff member assigned to the project.

 

PBS Hawai‘i
Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box 29606
Honolulu, HI   96820-2006

 

Or Email to humanresources@pbshawaii.org

 

Or fax to 808. 462. 5090.

 

EEO

 

Click to Download the PBS Hawai‘i Part-Time Employment Application Form (PDF)

 


PBS Hawai‘i hires Cheryl Oncea as new Advancement VP

PBS Hawaii

 

PBS Hawaii hires Cheryl OnceaHONOLULU, HI – PBS Hawai‘i has hired Cheryl Oncea as its new Vice President of Advancement. Oncea will head fundraising initiatives at PBS Hawai‘i, a non-profit media organization and Hawai‘i’s only statewide public television station.

 

Oncea has 25 years’ experience in Hawai‘i’s media landscape, leading sales and advertising teams at KSSK Radio, KHON2, Pacific Business News, KGMB and most recently, Hawaii News Now.

 

PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO Leslie Wilcox said, “Cheryl is very skilled and creative in generating revenue support for media enterprises. We’re her first nonprofit, but she knows us well, as an avid viewer and industry colleague.”

 

“I am thrilled that my career path has led me to this opportunity to join PBS Hawai‘i,” Oncea stated. “It is a rare chance to work at a locally owned television station with the specific mission of serving our community and advancing learning and discovery.”

 

Download this Press Release

 

For questions regarding this press release:

 

Contact: Liberty Peralta
Email: lperalta@pbshawaii.org
Phone: 808.973.1383

 

PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. PBSHawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

PBS Hawai‘i hires Jason Suapaia as new Creative Services VP

PBS Hawaii

 

Jason SuapaiaHONOLULU, HI – PBS Hawai‘i has hired Jason Suapaia, a longtime creative professional and executive in Hawaii, as its new Vice President of Creative Services.

 

Suapaia will lead a team of creatives in producing local programs and multimedia content that capture Hawai‘i’s unique stories, music, culture and public affairs.

 

Suapaia, who is leaving his position as President and Executive Producer at Hawai‘i-based creative media agency, 1013 Integrated, said he has enjoyed his commercial career and looks forward to applying his skills at a beloved nonprofit institution.

 

“I’m looking forward to creating content that the people of Hawai‘i find enlightening and meaningful,” he said.

 

“Jason is well-regarded as a team builder and creative problem solver, and he’ll be putting his considerable skills to use in developing and producing quality local programming,” said Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO.

 

Suapaia is an alumnus of the Pacific Century Fellows, Board President of the Film and Video Association of Hawai‘i, co-founder of ‘Ohina The Short Film Showcase, and in 2011 was named as a young business stand-out (Forty Under 40) by Pacific Business News.

 

Download this Press Release

 

For questions regarding this press release:

 

Contact: Liberty Peralta
Email: lperalta@pbshawaii.org
Phone: 808.973.1383

 

PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. PBSHawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

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