Judo

HIKI NŌ
Lokahi Program

 

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“Lokahi Program”
Students from McKinley High School on Oʻahu feature their school’s Lokahi Program, an outreach activity in which students bond with senior citizens at the Kulana Hale Senior Apartments in Honolulu. The students organize an annual senior citizen prom for the residents and lead activities such as arts and crafts and karaoke. Friendships between kupuna and teens, such as the one between resident Faye Kubo and student Regina Nguyen, blossom. Says Regina, “The way I see Faye is the way I see my friends at school. We can literally talk about anything.” Faye says that through her interaction with Regina and other students, “I learn that there’s hope.”

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului profile a married couple that wanted to start a family and ended up turning to adoption to find their bundle of joy.

 

Students from Waiʻanae Intermediate School in West Oʻahu discover the values a judo instructor teaches his students.

 

Students from Kalākaua Intermediate School in the Kalihi district of Oʻahu introduce us to a local sculptor who uses invasive tree branches to create a replica of an ancient voyaging canoe.

 

Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauaʻi feature a singing nun who uses music to teach her students valuable lessons.

 

A violinist from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui presents us with an introspective video self-portrait.

 

Plus—a public service announcement from students at Kealakehe Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island raises awareness about human trafficking.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ also features students’ profiles on their HIKI NŌ teachers.

 

 

 

Olympic Quest: Teshya and Clarissa

Olympic Quest: Teshya Alo and Clarissa Chun

 

This special presentation celebrates two Olympic hopefuls from Hawaii: Teshya Alo and Clarissa Chun. They are competing in the U.S. Olympic Wrestling Trials on April 9-10 in Iowa City.

 

The film Winning Girl follows the four-year journey of Hawaii teenager Teshya Alo, whose sights are set on taking the gold at international judo and wrestling championships. Throughout, she also faces the challenges of growing up.

 

Then, Clarissa Chun talks to Leslie Wilcox about her experiences in what she calls a “fun but gruesome” sport. Long before winning an Olympic bronze medal in wrestling, Clarissa started competing in judo at age 7. By the time she took up wrestling at Roosevelt High School, Clarissa was unfazed about grappling with both boys and girls.

 

PBS Hawaii showcases
Olympic wrestling hopefuls

Press Release Header

 

BACK-TO-BACK PROGRAMS ON TESHYA ALO, CLARISSA CHUN TO AIR APRIL 7

 

HONOLULU, HI – PBS Hawaii hosts a special broadcast presentation April 7 featuring two female wrestlers from Hawaii, just as they compete for a shot at the 2016 Summer Olympic Games in Rio.

 

TESHYA ALO, CLARISSA CHUNTeshya Alo, 18, and Clarissa Chun, 34, will be in Iowa City, IA, April 9-10 at the U.S. Olympic Team Trials. Top athletes from across the nation will be there, hoping to represent the U.S.

 

Right before the trials, the documentary Winning Girl will make its PBS Hawaii debut April 7 at 8:00 pm. The locally produced documentary follows Alo for four years, as she competes in judo and wrestling tournaments around the world. Then at 9:00 pm, a re-edited Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox features a 2013 interview with Chun, who calls wrestling a “fun but gruesome sport.” The back-to-back presentation will also feature updates from both women.

 

“This is a timely presentation on the monumentally determined Hawaii women whose strength of body, mind and heart has taken them all the way to the 2016 Olympic wrestling trials,” said Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawaii President and CEO.

 

“My mindset is just being in the moment and taking it all in because this is my last run at it,” said Chun about her preparation for this year’s Olympic Trials. “There is no more four years for me after this.” Chun previously earned a bronze medal at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.

 

For Alo, the Olympic Trials is a culmination of the training she’s gone through since age 6, saying she is “ready to deploy.” In a statement, she said: “It will be historical for me to show the world through action, not words, that dreaming big works – because I understand that dreaming means to work.”

 

Hawaii filmmaker Kimberlee Bassford and her production company, Making Waves Films LLC, are behind Winning Girl. Previously, Bassford produced Patsy Mink: Ahead of the Majority, a documentary on the late U.S. Representative that aired on PBS stations nationwide in 2009.

 

Download this Press Release

 

For questions regarding this press release
Contact: Liberty Peralta
Email: lperalta@pbshawaii.org
Phone: 808.973.1383

 

PBS Hawaii is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Hawaii’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawaii and Hawaii to the world. PBSHawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii