Judo

HIKI NŌ 2|27|20:
2020 Winter Challenge Middle School Division | Program

 

This special edition features stories from the Middle School division of the 2020 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge.  On January 31, 2020, participating elementary, middle school and high school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the prompt: “The wisdom of elders brought to life by the young.”   Teachers could not provide hands-on help.  The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own.  The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

1.) How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?
 
2.) How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?
 
3.) How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, First-Place, Second-Place, Third-Place, and Honorable Mention awards were given in both the middle school and high school divisions. The following Middle School Division awardees will be featured in this special:

 

–First Place in the Middle School Division:

 

“Misfit Martial Arts Instructor”
The challenge team from ʻEwa Makai Middle School on Oʻahu tells the story of a martial arts instructor who passes down to his students life lessons he’s learned during his rocky youth.

 

–Second Place in the Middle School Division:

 

“Piano Teacher”
The challenge team from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School tells the story ofa grandmother who has taught piano to two generations of her family, as well as scores of other Maui residents.

 

–Third Place in the Middle School Division:

 

“Coach Jensen”
The challenge team from Waiākea Elementary School on Hawaiʻi Island tells the story of a baseball stand-out who, because of his short stature, channeled his passion for the sport from playing to coaching.  Because there is not a separate elementary school division for HIKI NŌ challenges, elementary schools compete in the Middle School Division.  This is the first time an elementary school has placed in a HIKI NŌ Challenge.

 

–Honorable Mention in the Middle School Division:

 

”Ongaeshi: Giving Back”

 

The challenge team from Highlands Intermediate School on Oʻahu tells the story of a judo sensei who is passing his knowledge of this form of martial art to his children.

 

HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge stories from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui,Kealakehe Intermediate School in Kona, and Kapaʻa Middle School on Kauaʻi are also featured.

 

First-place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Second-place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Third-place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 12|5|19: 2019-2020 Student Television Network Challenge

 

This special edition features stories created by HIKI NŌ students that were submitted to the national Student Television Network (STN) competition in the News Feature category.  Participating student teams were given six days to conceptualize, organize, shoot, write and edit a story based on a particular theme, which was not announced until the beginning of the six-day production window.  The theme for this challenge was: Role Models.

 

TOP STORY

 

“For You”
Students from Waiʻanae High School in West Oʻahu tell the story of Lexton Butay-Joseph, a Waiʻanae High School senior whose uncle and role model passed away under tragic circumstances.  Lexton had never been close with his father, but through their shared grief over Lextonʻs uncle (his fatherʻs brother), a bond between father and son has been forged.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

“Young Champion”
Students from Waiʻanae Intermediate School in West Oʻahu tell the story of Logyn Lynn Puahala, a nine-year-old female judo champion who serves as a role model to her best friend and fellow judo student Eli Oshiro.  The story also features Logynʻs judo coach and role model, her father Robin Puahala.

 

“Period Hawaiʻi”
Students from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu tell the story of Courtney Coleman, the lead organizer of Period Hawaiʻi.  Courtney was inspired to take on this position by Nadya Okimoto, the founder of the national Period Movement. Period Hawaiʻi fights for access to menstrual hygiene products for all Hawaiʻi women (whether they be homeless, incarcerated or otherwise unable to afford the products).

 

“Uncle Russell”
Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauaʻi tell the story of a Kauaʻi man who has become a role model to many because of his volunteer work for the Foodbank and for teaching water sports to handicapped children and adults.

 

“Mana Wahine”
Students from ʻEwa Makai Middle School on Oʻahu tell the story of Alexis Akiona, a young fashion designer who looks to her mother as her role model.  Alexis credits her mother for teaching her how to be a strong woman, or mana wahine.

 

“Role Model Teacher/Dad”
Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani tell the story of an elementary school teacher who straddles his dual life as a role model for his students and for his offspring.

 

“Homecoming”
Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a young woman who was once trapped in the foster care system and is now paying it forward by helping children who are going through the same hardship.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Lokahi Program

 

TOP STORY

 

“Lokahi Program”
Students from McKinley High School on Oʻahu feature their school’s Lokahi Program, an outreach activity in which students bond with senior citizens at the Kulana Hale Senior Apartments in Honolulu. The students organize an annual senior citizen prom for the residents and lead activities such as arts and crafts and karaoke. Friendships between kupuna and teens, such as the one between resident Faye Kubo and student Regina Nguyen, blossom. Says Regina, “The way I see Faye is the way I see my friends at school. We can literally talk about anything.” Faye says that through her interaction with Regina and other students, “I learn that there’s hope.”

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului profile a married couple that wanted to start a family and ended up turning to adoption to find their bundle of joy.

 

Students from Waiʻanae Intermediate School in West Oʻahu discover the values a judo instructor teaches his students.

 

Students from Kalākaua Intermediate School in the Kalihi district of Oʻahu introduce us to a local sculptor who uses invasive tree branches to create a replica of an ancient voyaging canoe.

 

Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauaʻi feature a singing nun who uses music to teach her students valuable lessons.

 

A violinist from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui presents us with an introspective video self-portrait.

 

Plus—a public service announcement from students at Kealakehe Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island raises awareness about human trafficking.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ also features students’ profiles on their HIKI NŌ teachers.

 

 

 

Olympic Quest: Teshya and Clarissa

Olympic Quest: Teshya Alo and Clarissa Chun

 

This special presentation celebrates two Olympic hopefuls from Hawaii: Teshya Alo and Clarissa Chun. They are competing in the U.S. Olympic Wrestling Trials on April 9-10 in Iowa City.

 

The film Winning Girl follows the four-year journey of Hawaii teenager Teshya Alo, whose sights are set on taking the gold at international judo and wrestling championships. Throughout, she also faces the challenges of growing up.

 

Then, Clarissa Chun talks to Leslie Wilcox about her experiences in what she calls a “fun but gruesome” sport. Long before winning an Olympic bronze medal in wrestling, Clarissa started competing in judo at age 7. By the time she took up wrestling at Roosevelt High School, Clarissa was unfazed about grappling with both boys and girls.

 

PBS Hawaii showcases
Olympic wrestling hopefuls

Press Release Header

 

BACK-TO-BACK PROGRAMS ON TESHYA ALO, CLARISSA CHUN TO AIR APRIL 7

 

HONOLULU, HI – PBS Hawaii hosts a special broadcast presentation April 7 featuring two female wrestlers from Hawaii, just as they compete for a shot at the 2016 Summer Olympic Games in Rio.

 

TESHYA ALO, CLARISSA CHUNTeshya Alo, 18, and Clarissa Chun, 34, will be in Iowa City, IA, April 9-10 at the U.S. Olympic Team Trials. Top athletes from across the nation will be there, hoping to represent the U.S.

 

Right before the trials, the documentary Winning Girl will make its PBS Hawaii debut April 7 at 8:00 pm. The locally produced documentary follows Alo for four years, as she competes in judo and wrestling tournaments around the world. Then at 9:00 pm, a re-edited Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox features a 2013 interview with Chun, who calls wrestling a “fun but gruesome sport.” The back-to-back presentation will also feature updates from both women.

 

“This is a timely presentation on the monumentally determined Hawaii women whose strength of body, mind and heart has taken them all the way to the 2016 Olympic wrestling trials,” said Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawaii President and CEO.

 

“My mindset is just being in the moment and taking it all in because this is my last run at it,” said Chun about her preparation for this year’s Olympic Trials. “There is no more four years for me after this.” Chun previously earned a bronze medal at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.

 

For Alo, the Olympic Trials is a culmination of the training she’s gone through since age 6, saying she is “ready to deploy.” In a statement, she said: “It will be historical for me to show the world through action, not words, that dreaming big works – because I understand that dreaming means to work.”

 

Hawaii filmmaker Kimberlee Bassford and her production company, Making Waves Films LLC, are behind Winning Girl. Previously, Bassford produced Patsy Mink: Ahead of the Majority, a documentary on the late U.S. Representative that aired on PBS stations nationwide in 2009.

 

Download this Press Release

 

For questions regarding this press release
Contact: Liberty Peralta
Email: lperalta@pbshawaii.org
Phone: 808.973.1383

 

PBS Hawaii is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Hawaii’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawaii and Hawaii to the world. PBSHawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii