Kahului

HIKI NŌ
Compilation Show from the Spring Quarter of the 2018-2019 School Year

 

This compilation show features some of the top stories from the Spring Quarter of the 2018-2019 school year. Besides being excellent stories, these pieces all explore the connections between people and, in some cases, between people and other living things.

 

Students from McKinley High School in Honolulu tell the story of teenagers who connect with senior citizens in ways that bridge the generation gap.

 

Students from Waiʻanae High School in Central Oʻahu tell the story of a young tattoo artist who uses his art form to connect with his Hawaiian heritage.

 

Students from Konawaena High School on Hawaiʻi Island feature a 96-year-old Holocaust survivor who connects with Big Island students by teaching them about the devastating effects of bigotry and racism.

 

Students from Hilo Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island focus on the special connection between a bone marrow donor and the recipient of that donation who discover (despite the astronomical odds against it happening) that they live just minutes away from one another.

 

Students from Kua O Ka Lā Miloliʻi Hipuʻu Virtual Academy on Hawaiʻi Island follow conservationists who are facilitating the connection between male and female members of an endangered Hawaiian crow in order to save the species from extinction.

 

Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauaʻi introduce us to a singing nun who uses music to help students connect with the values she tries to instill in them.

 

Students from Maui High School in Kahului show us how a disabled student makes profound connections with her non-disabled peers through a program developed by the Special Olympics.

 

Students from Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a pet placement service that connects homeless canines with their forever owners.

 

This special episode is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ graduate from Waiʻanae High School on Oʻahu who has just completed her junior year at Menlo College in Northern California, where she majors in marketing and human resources.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
2019 HIKI NŌ Spring Challenge

 

This special edition features stories from the 2019 HIKI NŌ Spring Challenge. On April 26, 2019, participating middle school and high school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the theme: “The unappreciated beauty of simple, everyday things.” Teachers could not provide hands-on help. The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own. The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

1.) How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?

2.) How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?

3.) How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, first-place, second-place and third-place awards were given in both the middle school and high school divisions. An honorable mention prize was awarded if the judges felt that a story which did not place first, second or third deserved special recognition. The following awardees will be featured in the special:

 

HIKI NO #1019: HIKI NŌ Spring Challenge

 

First Place in the High School Division: Moanalua High School on Oʻahu features sophomore Rogue Williams, who has cerebral palsy and other physical conditions that make walking a challenge. Rogue expresses how the simple act of walking can be taken for granted.

 

First Place in the Middle School Division: Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui features a mixed-martial-arts trainer who has come to appreciate the simple joys of his extended family of co-workers and clients.

 

Second Place in the High School Division: Maui High School in Kahului tells how residents of a domestic violence shelter have come to appreciate the simple joy of being in a safe place.

 

Second Place in the Middle School Division: Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani spotlights a business that brings back the simple, everyday joy of having fun.

 

Third Place in the High School Division: Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi features a water safety officer who remembers to appreciate the simple beauty of the ocean.

 

Third Place in the Middle School Division: Ewa Makai Middle School on Oʻahu focuses on the beauty in the simple, commonplace ritual of lei-giving.

 

An Honorable Mention in the High School Division was awarded to Kalāheo High School in Windward Oʻahu for their study of a simple, everyday beauty product: lipstick.

 

First-place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Second-place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Third-place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. The Honorable mention winner will receive $100 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Unified Sports

 

TOP STORY

 

“Unified Sports”
Students from Maui High School in Kahului feature fellow student Britney Bautista. Britney, who has a developmental delay syndrome, has gained a sense of belonging through the school’s Special Olympics Unified Sports program. This program brings students with and without disabilities together to participate in sports, socials, and other extracurricular activities. Britney is also one of only twelve U.S. youth ambassadors to the Special Olympics, which gives her a voice to advocate for the advancement of inclusive youth leadership. “My goal is to introduce Special Olympics to the younger generation,” says Britney. “I want them to learn that everyone is the same, and nobody should be judged by what their physical characteristics look like.”

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

Students from Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy in Waimea on Hawaiʻi Island introduce us to a wahine paniolo champion.

 

Students from Hilo Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a bone marrow donor in Hilo who discovered that the recipient of his bone marrow lives just a few minutes away from him.

 

Students from Hawaiʻi Technology Academy on Oʻahu profile Hawaiʻi’s fledgling ice hockey league.

 

Students from Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a dedicated group of dog lovers who place homeless canines with their new, forever owners.

 

Students from Mililani High School in Central Oʻahu share a public service announcement about simple changes people can make that will have a positive impact on life in Hawaiʻi.

 

Plus, a montage of HIKI NŌ stories from Saint Francis School on Oʻahu, whose 95-year-old history is ending at the close of this school year.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ also features students’ profiles on their HIKI NŌ teachers.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Lokahi Program

 

TOP STORY

 

“Lokahi Program”
Students from McKinley High School on Oʻahu feature their school’s Lokahi Program, an outreach activity in which students bond with senior citizens at the Kulana Hale Senior Apartments in Honolulu. The students organize an annual senior citizen prom for the residents and lead activities such as arts and crafts and karaoke. Friendships between kupuna and teens, such as the one between resident Faye Kubo and student Regina Nguyen, blossom. Says Regina, “The way I see Faye is the way I see my friends at school. We can literally talk about anything.” Faye says that through her interaction with Regina and other students, “I learn that there’s hope.”

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului profile a married couple that wanted to start a family and ended up turning to adoption to find their bundle of joy.

 

Students from Waiʻanae Intermediate School in West Oʻahu discover the values a judo instructor teaches his students.

 

Students from Kalākaua Intermediate School in the Kalihi district of Oʻahu introduce us to a local sculptor who uses invasive tree branches to create a replica of an ancient voyaging canoe.

 

Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauaʻi feature a singing nun who uses music to teach her students valuable lessons.

 

A violinist from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui presents us with an introspective video self-portrait.

 

Plus—a public service announcement from students at Kealakehe Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island raises awareness about human trafficking.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ also features students’ profiles on their HIKI NŌ teachers.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
#1014 – Top Stories from the Winter Quarter of the 2018-2019 School Year

HIKI NŌ #1014 – Top stories from the Winter Quarter of the 2018-2019 school year

 

This compilation show features some of the top stories from the Winter Quarter of the 2018-2019 school year:

 

–Students from Maui High School in Kahului introduce us to Maui High robotics captain John Fabella. John’s mother passed away when he was just seven years of age, and his father was deported. Growing up without his biological parents, John found an extended family in his Maui Waena Intermediate School robotics team and later, in the Maui High School team.

 

Program

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School on tell the story of a female wrestler who used to be teased and bullied about her weight, and lost the pounds to regain her self-esteem.

 

–Students from Kalāheo High School in Windward O‘ahu focus on the importance of taking responsibility while driving. Their story is framed by the recent traffic fatalities in the Kaka‘ako neighborhood of O‘ahu and how that tragedy sparked a family’s memories of losing their daughter in a drunk driving incident.

 

–Students from Hawai‘i Preparatory Academy Middle School in the Waimea district of Hawai‘i Island show us the proper way to saddle a horse.

 

–Students from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu feature two cancer survivors who battled with their diseases at a very early age: Lily Mallory, who was undergoing treatment for her cancer at the age of three, and Emi Robison, who was battling leukemia at the age of seven.

 

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i introduce us to Mike Coots, a surfer and photographer from Kīlauea, Kaua‘i, who lost his leg in a shark attack and now, ironically, works to protect sharks against the ravages of the shark fin soup industry.

 

–Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului feature a food truck owner who starts a pay-it-forward campaign to help feed workers affected by the recent federal government shutdown.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu introduce us to figure skater and Moanalua High School senior Kyra Fukumoto. While Hawai‘i has only one ice skating rink, and its resources for training figure skaters is very limited compared to the Mainland, Kyra is adamant about being based out of her home state. She is very proud of being from Hawai‘i and looks forward to representing the islands in her career as a figure skater.

 

This special episode is hosted by Tyler Bright, a 2018 HIKI NŌ graduate from Wai‘anae High School on O‘ahu who is currently studying biology at Chaminade University in Honolulu, with hopes of becoming either a canine rehabilitation therapist or a physical therapist.

 

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
#1013 – The 2019 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge

HIKI NŌ 1013: The 2019 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge

 

This special edition features stories from the 2019 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge. On February 1, 2019, 12 participating middle school teams and nine participating high school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the Hawaiian value of kuleana (to take responsibility). Teachers could not provide hands-on help. The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own. The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

Program

 

1.) How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?
2.) How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?
3.) How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, first-place, second-place and third-place awards were given in both the middle school and high school divisions. An honorable mention prize was awarded if the judges felt that a story which did not place first, second or third deserved special recognition. The following awardees will be featured in the special:

 

–First Place in the High School Division: Kalāheo High School in Windward O‘ahu focuses on the importance of taking responsibility while driving. Their story is framed by the recent traffic fatalities in the Kaka‘ako neighborhood of O‘ahu and how that tragedy sparked a family’s memories of losing their daughter in a drunk driving incident.

 

–First Place in the Middle School Division: Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului features a food truck owner who starts a pay-it-forward campaign to help feed workers affected by the recent federal government shutdown.

 

–Second Place in the High School Division: Maui High School in Kahului tells the behind-the-scenes story of a locally produced feature film titled Kuleana.

 

–Second Place in the Middle School Division: Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu shines a spotlight on the B.R.A.V.E. (Be Respectful and Value Everyone), a non-profit organization whose mission is to raise awareness about bullying and spread the values of respect and kindness.

 

–Third Place in the High School Division: H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui profiles Sea Walls Maui, an art/activism program that promotes awareness of environmental issues through the painting of outdoor murals.

 

–Third Place in the Middle School Division: Volcano School of Arts and Sciences on Hawai‘i Island focuses on stewards of a sacred beach in Ka‘ū.

 

–An Honorable Mention in the Middle School Division was awarded to Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani for their story on a pharmacist who dedicates himself to serving the Native Hawaiian community.

 

First-place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

Second-place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

Third-place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

Honorable mention winners will receive $100 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
#1008 – The Top Stories of the Fall Semester, 2018-2019

HIKI NŌ Episode 1008 – The Top Stories of the Fall Semester, 2018-2019

 

This compilation show features some of the top stories from the fall semester of the 2018-2019 school year. Each of the stories presents a variation on a theme that has become a hallmark of HIKI NŌ storytelling: empathy.

 

Program

 

–Students at Waiākea High School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island tell the story of a married couple for whom empathy has become a profession and a way of life: husband and wife both work in the foster care industry and foster children themselves.

 

–Students at H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tell the story of a fitness coach who channels his own physical and psychological challenges into developing empathy for his clients.

 

–Students at Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a young woman who is grappling depression and has, on occasion, harmed herself. The student storytellers who created this feature deal with this sensitive topic with a great deal of empathy.

 

–Students at Konawaena High School and Konawaena Middle School on Hawai‘i Island collaborated on a story which shows that empathy is not limited to people’s feelings for other people. Human interactions with goats at the Dancing Goat Sanctuary prove that animals often elicit and deserve our empathy.

 

–Students at Kamehameha Schools Maui High School show how one teenager’s empathy for girls who suffer from low self-esteem inspired her to launch a positive self-image workshop for young women.

 

–Students at ‘Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu tell an empathy-driven story about the highly personal connection between a young dancer and her art form.

 

–Students at Waimea High School on Kaua‘i tell the story of a girl’s battle with Hodgkin’s lymphoma in a way that leads viewers from feeling sympathy for to sharing empathy with the young patient.

 

This special episode is hosted by Yasha Ronquillo, a 2018 HIKI NŌ graduate from Maui High School who is currently a part-time HIKI NŌ teacher at her alma mater.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #1005 – Breaking Gender Norms and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

“Breaking Gender Norms”
Students from McKinley High School on O‘ahu introduce us to their school’s quarterback, who happens to be a female. On August 19, 2017, McKinley sophomore Alexandria Buchanan became the first female varsity quarterback to start a game in Hawai‘i. She recounts her progress from playing on the junior varsity team as a freshman to becoming the starting quarterback on the varsity team. “I’m proud I got this far,” says Buchanan, “I never expected to be on the varsity level, let alone starting as their quarterback. I take a lot of pride in it. I take a lot of pride in having my team and my coaches trust in me.” McKinley’s football coach and its athletic director also discuss how more and more females have been playing football in recent years, challenging the old perception that it is a sport strictly for men.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui, introduce us to a female intermediate school student who inspires younger students to embrace the wonders of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math).

 

–Students from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i give us an inside look at their school’s building construction class.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu shine a spotlight on a downtown-Honolulu arts organization: The Arts at Marks Garage.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui High School introduce us to a young woman who has created a program that helps other young women build self-confidence and separate their sense of self-worth from social media.

 

–Students from Waimea High School on Kaua‘i present a profile in courage: a young girl who defeated cancer and gained strength and ambition from the experience.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
U.S. Senate / Maui County Council – Kahului

 

Our last INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I before the General Election features two candidate forums:

 

–At 8:00 pm, it’s the race for U.S. Senate. Mazie Hirono (D) has captured national and local attention with her criticism of President Trump and of his appointee to the Supreme Court, Brett Kavanaugh. She is trying for a second consecutive six-year term as Hawaii’s junior senator. Challenging her re-election effort is Republican Ron Curtis, a retired engineer who beat seven competitors in the primary election.

 

–At 8:30 pm, Maui’s outgoing mayor Alan Arakawa may face a tall order in trying to win back the Maui County Council – Kahului seat he once held against Natalie Kama, who was the top vote getter in the primary.

 

Join us during these live forums by phoning in or by leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also live streamed on pbshawaii.org and PBS Hawaiʻi’s Facebook page.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

To see an archive of past INSIGHTS ELECTION 2018 shows, click here.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
HIKI NŌ Class of 2018 Special, Part 1 of 4

 

Over the summer, twelve outstanding HIKI NŌ graduates from the class of 2018 gathered at PBS Hawai‘i to discuss their HIKI NŌ experiences and how they feel the skills they learned from HIKI NŌ will help them in college, the workplace and life. Their insightful and refreshingly honest conversations can be seen in four HIKI NŌ Class of 2018 Specials.

 

This first special features Brooke Kanna, who graduated from Kaua‘i High School in Līhu‘e and is now majoring in Cinema and Media Arts at Biola University in Southern California; Yasha Ronquillo, who graduated from Maui High School in Kahului and is now majoring in Applied Business and Information Technology at the University of Hawai‘i Maui College; and Grace Benton, who graduated from Kalāheo High School in Windward O‘ahu and is now majoring in Data Science at the University of San Francisco.

 

To start each episode, each graduate shows a HIKI NŌ story that they worked on and discusses what they learned from the experience of working on that particular story. Yasha presents her story “I Am Able,” about a middle school student with spina bifida who won’t let his handicap keep him from pursuing his dreams. Grace shows “Agnes’ Portuguese Bake Shop,” about the closing of a landmark Windward O‘ahu bakery. Brooke shows her story “J-1 Visa Program,” about a program run by McDonald’s that gives teenagers from foreign countries hands-on work experience.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 22, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 23, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

 

 

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