Kahului

HIKI NŌ 2|13|20: A Son’s Love and Other Stories | Program

 

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“A Sonʻs Love”
Students from Maui High School in Kahului, Maui, tell the story of a single mother who hits rock bottom after suffering from a series of emotional and physical ailments. Through the love and support of her son, she eventually learns how to enjoy her new life and look to the future.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

“Lucky Bees”
Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School on the Valley Isle tell the story of a passionate Kīhei beekeeper who aims to protect the island’s native bee population from dangers afflicting bee colonies around the world.

 

“Okinawan Connection”
Students from Kalāheo High School from the Kailua district of Oʻahu tell the story of Hawaiʻi Okinawans who sent 550 pigs to revitalize pig farming and bring normalcy to an Okinawa devastated by World War II.

 

“How to De-Stress”
Students from Hilo Intermediate School on the Big Island show us three tips on how to “put stress to rest” in our ever-busy world.

 

“Heart of Gold”
Students from Moanalua High School on the island of Oʻahu tell the story of a bubbly woman who believes in living every day to its fullest while working hard to take care of her Alzheimer’s-afflicted mother.

 

Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School host this episode of HIKI NŌ from their campus in Pukalani, Maui.

 

 

 

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG
Ahumanu

 

We’re proud to present a brand-new episode of NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG featuring the all-wāhine Hawaiian music trio Ahumanu, from Maui. Members Kekai Robinson, Marja Lehua Apisaloma and Liz Morales say their work in the community outside the entertainment realm brings to their music a dimension of authenticity, service and responsibility. The trio, whose name translates to “a gathering of birds,” performs songs including “E ʻAno ʻAno Ē” and “Kahi Aloha.” Guitarist Josh Kahula and steel guitarist Casey Olsen are also featured, with Leinaʻala Kuloloio Vedder providing hula accompaniment.

 

 

 

Ahumanu
Maui-based Trio

Cover story by Liberty Peralta, PBS Hawaiʻi

 

Ahumanu on Nā Mele: Traditions in Hawaiian Song

Members of Ahumanu: Kekai Robinson, Marja Lehua Apisaloma and Liz Morales

 

Like the latest smartphone or computer software, Ahumanu founding member Liz Morales calls the band’s third and current lineup of band members “Ahumanu 3.0.”

 

It’s not unusual for bands to see lineup changes. But Morales, a former radio personality, is confident that this version is something special.

 

“We have our own sound, and that comes from working with what we have,” Morales says. “Since we had so many different players, each version of Ahumanu sounded very different, so I think it’s only until Ahumanu 3.0 that I realized, hey, this is kind of different, I like it.”

 

Marja Lehua Apisaloma and Kekai Robinson round out the Maui trio, whose name translates as “a gathering of birds.” Each member brings her own contributions to the Ahumanu table.

 

Ahumanu on Nā Mele: Traditions in Hawaiian Song

 

Apisaloma says her day job as a registered nurse helps add some level of authenticity to the group’s music – a reminder of how much they have to be thankful for, down to the most essential details.

 

“We can breathe and we can use the bathroom on our own, we can walk on our own, we can speak,” she says. “You see all of that as a nurse and see people at their most vulnerable times. It’s such a drastic difference from the entertainment industry because you put on a face and it’s all a show.”

 

Robinson, who heads Hawaiian immersion school Ke Kula ʻO Piʻilani by day, says Ahumanu is an extension of the community work that’s played an important role in her life.

 

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN MUSIC - Ahumanu airs Monday, February 24 at 7:30 pm. Sponsored by: Hawaiian Airlines and First Hawaiian Bank“I practice Hawaiian oli (chants), and those are the messages and the voices of our ancestors coming through,” she says. “The messages that they give us are relevant now, so there’s a great sense of responsibility there to do the same in our music.”

 

That responsibility shows in songs like “Kahi Aloha,” one of several songs that Ahumanu performs on an upcoming episode of PBS Hawaiʻi’s Nā Mele: Traditions in Hawaiian Song. Originally written as a wedding gift, “Kahi Aloha” has taken on a larger meaning in Robinson’s eyes.

 

“Aloha has become a big part of this contemporary move towards protecting our environment, protecting what we have,” she says. “When you stand in aloha, you can come at me and bring whatever it is that you are to me, but I am going to stand here and remain respectful towards you. It’s a discipline, and so, I understand it now. It’s not our normal state. We want to work towards aloha being a normal state.”

 

Through their weekly pau hana performances in Kahului, Ahumanu has a regular platform to share their messages in song, with authenticity, respect and love. Ahumanu 3.0 is on a roll, and Morales ponders what’s next.

 

“I’d like to be a resource for the next generation of musicians that would like to do this,” she says. “Growing up in this field, it was such a mess. I didn’t know how to get where I wanted to be and those lines were so unclear … [now] I’m living the life, having a great time and very happy that I’m able to help perpetuate what we’ve known forever: Hawaiian music.”

 

 

HIKI NŌ 12|5|19: 2019-2020 Student Television Network Challenge

 

This special edition features stories created by HIKI NŌ students that were submitted to the national Student Television Network (STN) competition in the News Feature category.  Participating student teams were given six days to conceptualize, organize, shoot, write and edit a story based on a particular theme, which was not announced until the beginning of the six-day production window.  The theme for this challenge was: Role Models.

 

TOP STORY

 

“For You”
Students from Waiʻanae High School in West Oʻahu tell the story of Lexton Butay-Joseph, a Waiʻanae High School senior whose uncle and role model passed away under tragic circumstances.  Lexton had never been close with his father, but through their shared grief over Lextonʻs uncle (his fatherʻs brother), a bond between father and son has been forged.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

“Young Champion”
Students from Waiʻanae Intermediate School in West Oʻahu tell the story of Logyn Lynn Puahala, a nine-year-old female judo champion who serves as a role model to her best friend and fellow judo student Eli Oshiro.  The story also features Logynʻs judo coach and role model, her father Robin Puahala.

 

“Period Hawaiʻi”
Students from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu tell the story of Courtney Coleman, the lead organizer of Period Hawaiʻi.  Courtney was inspired to take on this position by Nadya Okimoto, the founder of the national Period Movement. Period Hawaiʻi fights for access to menstrual hygiene products for all Hawaiʻi women (whether they be homeless, incarcerated or otherwise unable to afford the products).

 

“Uncle Russell”
Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauaʻi tell the story of a Kauaʻi man who has become a role model to many because of his volunteer work for the Foodbank and for teaching water sports to handicapped children and adults.

 

“Mana Wahine”
Students from ʻEwa Makai Middle School on Oʻahu tell the story of Alexis Akiona, a young fashion designer who looks to her mother as her role model.  Alexis credits her mother for teaching her how to be a strong woman, or mana wahine.

 

“Role Model Teacher/Dad”
Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani tell the story of an elementary school teacher who straddles his dual life as a role model for his students and for his offspring.

 

“Homecoming”
Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a young woman who was once trapped in the foster care system and is now paying it forward by helping children who are going through the same hardship.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
The Top Stories of the Fall Semester, 2018-2019

HIKI NŌ Episode 1008 – The Top Stories of the Fall Semester, 2018-2019

 

This compilation show features some of the top stories from the fall semester of the 2018-2019 school year. Each of the stories presents a variation on a theme that has become a hallmark of HIKI NŌ storytelling: empathy.

 

Program

 

–Students at Waiākea High School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island tell the story of a married couple for whom empathy has become a profession and a way of life: husband and wife both work in the foster care industry and foster children themselves.

 

–Students at H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tell the story of a fitness coach who channels his own physical and psychological challenges into developing empathy for his clients.

 

–Students at Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a young woman who is grappling depression and has, on occasion, harmed herself. The student storytellers who created this feature deal with this sensitive topic with a great deal of empathy.

 

–Students at Konawaena High School and Konawaena Middle School on Hawai‘i Island collaborated on a story which shows that empathy is not limited to people’s feelings for other people. Human interactions with goats at the Dancing Goat Sanctuary prove that animals often elicit and deserve our empathy.

 

–Students at Kamehameha Schools Maui High School show how one teenager’s empathy for girls who suffer from low self-esteem inspired her to launch a positive self-image workshop for young women.

 

–Students at ‘Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu tell an empathy-driven story about the highly personal connection between a young dancer and her art form.

 

–Students at Waimea High School on Kaua‘i tell the story of a girl’s battle with Hodgkin’s lymphoma in a way that leads viewers from feeling sympathy for to sharing empathy with the young patient.

 

This special episode is hosted by Yasha Ronquillo, a 2018 HIKI NŌ graduate from Maui High School who is currently a part-time HIKI NŌ teacher at her alma mater.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Breaking Gender Norms and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

“Breaking Gender Norms”
Students from McKinley High School on O‘ahu introduce us to their school’s quarterback, who happens to be a female. On August 19, 2017, McKinley sophomore Alexandria Buchanan became the first female varsity quarterback to start a game in Hawaiʻi. She recounts her progress from playing on the junior varsity team as a freshman to becoming the starting quarterback on the varsity team. “I’m proud I got this far,” says Buchanan, “I never expected to be on the varsity level, let alone starting as their quarterback. I take a lot of pride in it. I take a lot of pride in having my team and my coaches trust in me.” McKinley’s football coach and its athletic director also discuss how more and more females have been playing football in recent years, challenging the old perception that it is a sport strictly for men.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui, introduce us to a female intermediate school student who inspires younger students to embrace the wonders of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math).

 

–Students from Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi give us an inside look at their school’s building construction class.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu shine a spotlight on a downtown-Honolulu arts organization: The Arts at Marks Garage.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui High School introduce us to a young woman who has created a program that helps other young women build self-confidence and separate their sense of self-worth from social media.

 

–Students from Waimea High School on Kauaʻi present a profile in courage: a young girl who defeated cancer and gained strength and ambition from the experience.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Compilation Show from the Spring Quarter of the 2018-2019 School Year

 

This compilation show features some of the top stories from the Spring Quarter of the 2018-2019 school year. Besides being excellent stories, these pieces all explore the connections between people and, in some cases, between people and other living things.

 

Students from McKinley High School in Honolulu tell the story of teenagers who connect with senior citizens in ways that bridge the generation gap.

 

Students from Waiʻanae High School in Central Oʻahu tell the story of a young tattoo artist who uses his art form to connect with his Hawaiian heritage.

 

Students from Konawaena High School on Hawaiʻi Island feature a 96-year-old Holocaust survivor who connects with Big Island students by teaching them about the devastating effects of bigotry and racism.

 

Students from Hilo Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island focus on the special connection between a bone marrow donor and the recipient of that donation who discover (despite the astronomical odds against it happening) that they live just minutes away from one another.

 

Students from Kua O Ka Lā Miloliʻi Hipuʻu Virtual Academy on Hawaiʻi Island follow conservationists who are facilitating the connection between male and female members of an endangered Hawaiian crow in order to save the species from extinction.

 

Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauaʻi introduce us to a singing nun who uses music to help students connect with the values she tries to instill in them.

 

Students from Maui High School in Kahului show us how a disabled student makes profound connections with her non-disabled peers through a program developed by the Special Olympics.

 

Students from Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a pet placement service that connects homeless canines with their forever owners.

 

This special episode is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ graduate from Waiʻanae High School on Oʻahu who has just completed her junior year at Menlo College in Northern California, where she majors in marketing and human resources.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
2019 HIKI NŌ Spring Challenge

 

This special edition features stories from the 2019 HIKI NŌ Spring Challenge. On April 26, 2019, participating middle school and high school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the theme: “The unappreciated beauty of simple, everyday things.” Teachers could not provide hands-on help. The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own. The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

1.) How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?

2.) How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?

3.) How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, first-place, second-place and third-place awards were given in both the middle school and high school divisions. An honorable mention prize was awarded if the judges felt that a story which did not place first, second or third deserved special recognition. The following awardees will be featured in the special:

 

HIKI NO #1019: HIKI NŌ Spring Challenge

 

First Place in the High School Division: Moanalua High School on Oʻahu features sophomore Rogue Williams, who has cerebral palsy and other physical conditions that make walking a challenge. Rogue expresses how the simple act of walking can be taken for granted.

 

First Place in the Middle School Division: Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui features a mixed-martial-arts trainer who has come to appreciate the simple joys of his extended family of co-workers and clients.

 

Second Place in the High School Division: Maui High School in Kahului tells how residents of a domestic violence shelter have come to appreciate the simple joy of being in a safe place.

 

Second Place in the Middle School Division: Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani spotlights a business that brings back the simple, everyday joy of having fun.

 

Third Place in the High School Division: Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi features a water safety officer who remembers to appreciate the simple beauty of the ocean.

 

Third Place in the Middle School Division: Ewa Makai Middle School on Oʻahu focuses on the beauty in the simple, commonplace ritual of lei-giving.

 

An Honorable Mention in the High School Division was awarded to Kalāheo High School in Windward Oʻahu for their study of a simple, everyday beauty product: lipstick.

 

First-place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Second-place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Third-place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. The Honorable mention winner will receive $100 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Unified Sports

 

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“Unified Sports”
Students from Maui High School in Kahului feature fellow student Britney Bautista. Britney, who has a developmental delay syndrome, has gained a sense of belonging through the school’s Special Olympics Unified Sports program. This program brings students with and without disabilities together to participate in sports, socials, and other extracurricular activities. Britney is also one of only twelve U.S. youth ambassadors to the Special Olympics, which gives her a voice to advocate for the advancement of inclusive youth leadership. “My goal is to introduce Special Olympics to the younger generation,” says Britney. “I want them to learn that everyone is the same, and nobody should be judged by what their physical characteristics look like.”

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

Students from Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy in Waimea on Hawaiʻi Island introduce us to a wahine paniolo champion.

 

Students from Hilo Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a bone marrow donor in Hilo who discovered that the recipient of his bone marrow lives just a few minutes away from him.

 

Students from Hawaiʻi Technology Academy on Oʻahu profile Hawaiʻi’s fledgling ice hockey league.

 

Students from Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a dedicated group of dog lovers who place homeless canines with their new, forever owners.

 

Students from Mililani High School in Central Oʻahu share a public service announcement about simple changes people can make that will have a positive impact on life in Hawaiʻi.

 

Plus, a montage of HIKI NŌ stories from Saint Francis School on Oʻahu, whose 95-year-old history is ending at the close of this school year.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ also features students’ profiles on their HIKI NŌ teachers.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Lokahi Program

 

TOP STORY

 

“Lokahi Program”
Students from McKinley High School on Oʻahu feature their school’s Lokahi Program, an outreach activity in which students bond with senior citizens at the Kulana Hale Senior Apartments in Honolulu. The students organize an annual senior citizen prom for the residents and lead activities such as arts and crafts and karaoke. Friendships between kupuna and teens, such as the one between resident Faye Kubo and student Regina Nguyen, blossom. Says Regina, “The way I see Faye is the way I see my friends at school. We can literally talk about anything.” Faye says that through her interaction with Regina and other students, “I learn that there’s hope.”

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului profile a married couple that wanted to start a family and ended up turning to adoption to find their bundle of joy.

 

Students from Waiʻanae Intermediate School in West Oʻahu discover the values a judo instructor teaches his students.

 

Students from Kalākaua Intermediate School in the Kalihi district of Oʻahu introduce us to a local sculptor who uses invasive tree branches to create a replica of an ancient voyaging canoe.

 

Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauaʻi feature a singing nun who uses music to teach her students valuable lessons.

 

A violinist from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui presents us with an introspective video self-portrait.

 

Plus—a public service announcement from students at Kealakehe Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island raises awareness about human trafficking.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ also features students’ profiles on their HIKI NŌ teachers.

 

 

 

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