Kapaʻa High School

HIKI NŌ 6|4|20:
HIKI NŌ 2020 Spring Challenge

 

This special episode features the winning stories from the HIKI NŌ 2020 Spring Challenge competition. In this year’s Spring Challenge, student teams from across the state were given four days to create a video portrait of a family that is sheltering at home together and how they are coping with life during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

The winners in the High School Division are:

 

1st Place – Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi, for their story about a family that builds a makeshift bowling lane in their backyard in order to bond together during their time sheltering at home.

 

2nd Place – Maui High School in Kahului, for their story about how a daughter grows closer to her parents during the COVID-19 lockdown.

 

3rd Place – Roosevelt High School in Honolulu, for their story about a high school senior who becomes the primary caregiver to his 95-year-old great-grandmother during the shelter-at-home mandate.

 

Honorable Mention – Waipahu High School on Oʻahu, for their story about a grandmother who uses her professional sewing experience to make masks for her family.

 

The winners in the Middle School Division are:

 

1st Place – Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, for their story about two sisters whose mother has lost her job due to the pandemic, leaving the father as the sole breadwinner in the household.

 

2nd Place – Kealakehe Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island, for their story about an only child who grows closer to her restaurant-owner parents when they spend more time at home with her due to the mandated restrictions on their business.

 

3rd Place – Kailua Intermediate School in Windward Oʻahu, for their story about a family that embraces the lost art of letter and card writing as a way of staying in touch with people while sheltering at home.

 

Honorable Mention – Waiʻanae Intermediate School, for their story about the stress a family undergoes adapting to major changes in their financial, professional and educational lives.

 

1st, 2nd, 3rd and Honorable Mention winners in both divisions will receive, respectively, $500, $300, $200 and $100 in production equipment or supplies for their school’s media program. All prizes are provided by State Farm®.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 5|21|20:
Student Reflections on COVID-19, Part Three

 

HIKI NŌ continues its series of reflections on how COVID-19 has changed students’ lives as they shelter-in-place from their homes. Elijah Villaroz, a senior at Roosevelt High School on Oʻahu, recalls a revelation his mother shared with him: that he (Elijah) was born a few weeks before the September 11th attacks and that he is now graduating during the COVID-19 pandemic. For Elijah, the realization that he and his fellow high school seniors were born and spent their childhoods between the two great crises of this century was daunting.

 

Other student correspondents who share their reflections in this episode include: Ethan Morse, a junior at Farrington High School on Oʻahu; Amee Neves, a senior at Waiʻanae High School in West Oʻahu; Suzanne Tran, a senior at Moanalua High School on Oʻahu; Marlon Utrera Jr., a 7th grader at Kealakehe Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island; and Jack Wilcox, an 8th grader at Āliamanu Middle School on Oʻahu. Topics range from a theatre company devising ways to rehearse online to a young vlogger who creates humorous yet informative videos on COVID-19 to a middle school student who builds masks with his 3D printer.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

Students from Konawaena High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of Kimura’s Fabric Store, a family-owned business that is still going strong after almost one hundred years. Students from Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi tell the story of father and son cacao farmers. A student from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui shares his personal narrative about how human relationships make life worth living.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 1|30|20: Online Bullying and Other Stories | Program

 

TOP STORY

 

“Online Bullying”
Students from Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi tell the story of a fellow student who had been bullied online at school and then sought the help of campus counselors to resolve the problem. The Kapaʻa High School counselors discuss their customized approach to each online bullying case, emphasizing that unique situations require different methods.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

“Coach Pete”
Students from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu tell the story of a coach who turned his life around and is now dedicated to helping young athletes excel.

 

“No Shortcuts”
Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on the Garden Isle tell the story of a Kauaʻi beekeeper who claims the honey she produces is superior because she refuses to take shortcuts in the process.

 

“How to Stretch”
Students from Kalani High School in East Honolulu show us how to stretch before working out to avoid injury.

 

“4 Sisters Forever”
Students from Waiʻanae High School in West Oʻahu tell the story of four sisters who pull together as their mother battles cancer.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ also features profiles on the unique music programs offered at some of the schools in the show.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 11|21|19:
2019 Fall Challenge

 

This special edition features stories from the 2019 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge.  On October 18, 2019, participating elementary, middle school and high school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the prompt: “Half of Hawaiʻi’s people are struggling financially even while many work two or three jobs.  Produce a story about a person or group of people who are dealing with this predicament.”   Teachers could not provide hands-on help.  The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own.  The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

1.) How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?

2.) How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?

3.) How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, first-place, second-place and third-place awards were given in both the middle school and high school divisions. The following awardees will be featured in the special:

 

First Place in the High School Division:

“Chazz’s World”

The challenge team from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tells the story of Chazz—a high school student who has to work at a pizza parlor to help his family pay the bills.  The story explores the stress and other emotional hardships the situation causes for Chazz.

 

First Place in the Middle School Division:

“Working for Love”

The challenge team from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School tells the story of a wife and husband who are both full-time teachers yet have to work additional jobs in order to make ends meet. (She cleans condos and he runs a yard service.)

 

Second Place in the High School Division:

“For the Family”

The challenge team from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu tells the story of a woman who lost her husband to leukemia and must now raise her daughters as a single mother.

 

Second Place in the Middle School Division:

“Hero Mom”

The challenge team from Maui Waena Intermediate School tells the story of a woman who holds down three jobs to support her family and whose dedication and sacrifice has made her a hero in her daughter’s eyes.

 

Third Place in the High School Division:

“Handling Hawaiʻi’s Financial Demands”

The challenge team from Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi tells the story of two young people who perform in a Polynesian revue but also hold down additional jobs to make ends meet.

 

Third Place in the Middle School Division:

“Go Jimmy Go”

The challenge team from Highlands Intermediate School on Oʻahu tells the story of a saxophone player who heads a very successful, nationally touring musical group but who also teaches at Highlands Intermediate to earn enough money to support his family.

 

First-place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Second-place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Third-place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Donut Dynamite and other stories

HIKI NŌ: Episode #1001 - Madame Donut and other stories

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui introduce us to a Filipino immigrant who legally changed her name to Madame Donut. Before opening Donut Dynamite in Wailuku, Maui, she attended culinary school, where one of her instructors was the pastry chef at the famous French Laundry Restaurant in California’s wine country. When she found out the restaurant had donuts on its menu, she decided to make donuts her medium for artistic expression. “I use the donuts kind of as a platform or a canvas to express my art and my life story,” Madam Donut says.

 

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi show us how their high school auto-shop class has moved into the 21st Century.

 

Students from Kalama Intermediate School on Maui explore the incredible hula legacy of Kumu Naomi “Sissy” Lake-Farm.

 

Students from Punahou School on Oʻahu show us how to make a beautiful work of art from a dead fish.

 

Students from Kalani High School in East Honolulu introduce us to a young woman who has discovered who she is by mentoring younger children on the ways of the ocean.

 

Students from ‘Īao School on Maui tell the story of a 6th grader who has created a way to motivate her peers to volunteer for community service.

 

And students from Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island introduce us to a married couple who dedicates their lives, on and off the job, to foster children.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
2019 HIKI NŌ Spring Challenge

 

This special edition features stories from the 2019 HIKI NŌ Spring Challenge. On April 26, 2019, participating middle school and high school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the theme: “The unappreciated beauty of simple, everyday things.” Teachers could not provide hands-on help. The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own. The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

1.) How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?

2.) How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?

3.) How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, first-place, second-place and third-place awards were given in both the middle school and high school divisions. An honorable mention prize was awarded if the judges felt that a story which did not place first, second or third deserved special recognition. The following awardees will be featured in the special:

 

HIKI NO #1019: HIKI NŌ Spring Challenge

 

First Place in the High School Division: Moanalua High School on Oʻahu features sophomore Rogue Williams, who has cerebral palsy and other physical conditions that make walking a challenge. Rogue expresses how the simple act of walking can be taken for granted.

 

First Place in the Middle School Division: Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui features a mixed-martial-arts trainer who has come to appreciate the simple joys of his extended family of co-workers and clients.

 

Second Place in the High School Division: Maui High School in Kahului tells how residents of a domestic violence shelter have come to appreciate the simple joy of being in a safe place.

 

Second Place in the Middle School Division: Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani spotlights a business that brings back the simple, everyday joy of having fun.

 

Third Place in the High School Division: Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi features a water safety officer who remembers to appreciate the simple beauty of the ocean.

 

Third Place in the Middle School Division: Ewa Makai Middle School on Oʻahu focuses on the beauty in the simple, commonplace ritual of lei-giving.

 

An Honorable Mention in the High School Division was awarded to Kalāheo High School in Windward Oʻahu for their study of a simple, everyday beauty product: lipstick.

 

First-place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Second-place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Third-place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. The Honorable mention winner will receive $100 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.