Kauaʻi High School

HIKI NŌ
The 2018 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge – High School Division

 

This special edition features stories from the High School Division of the 2018 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge. On October 19, 2018, ten participating high school teams and twelve participating middle school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the theme “the story behind the food”. Teachers could not provide hands-on help. The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own. The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

  1. How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?
  2. How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ  Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?
  3. How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, first place, second place, third place, and honorable mention awards were given in both the high school and middle school divisions. The winning high school stories featured in this episode are as follows:

 

–Tied for First Place: Kauaʻi High School in Lihue profiled the late Barbara Funamura, the originator of the spam musubi.

 

–Tied for First Place: Kamehameha Schools Maui High School in Pukalani profiled Maui chef Jonathan Mizukami.

 

–Second Place: H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui featured the family story behind Aunty Lia’s Baked Goods.

 

–Third Place: Kapa‘a High School on Kauaʻi spotlighted Pono Market in Kapaʻa.

 

–Honorable Mention: Farrington High School on Oʻahu revealed how much members of Hawaiʻi’s world championship little league team missed Hawai‘i food when they were on the road.

 

Also featured:

 

–Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island highlighted iconic Hilo eatery Kandi’s Drive-Inn.

 

–Moanalua High School on Oʻahu told the story of a young man who is carrying on his late father’s legacy through his family’s Chamorro Grindz food truck.

 

–Wa‘ianae High School on Oʻahu showed how a stay-at-home mom brought together her entire family through her Padicakes mochi business.

 

First place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Second place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Third place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Honorable mention winners will receive $100 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs announces 2019 Gwen Ifill Legacy Fellows at local PBS stations

PBS HAWAI‘I – News Release

315 Sand Island Access Rd.| p: 808.462.5000| pbshawaii.org
Honolulu, HI 96819-2295| f: 808.462.5090

 

Read the full press release here at PBS.org

 

Washington, D.C. – PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs (SRL) has selected three talented aspiring female journalists for summer fellowships at their local PBS stations: Mercedes Ezeji at KLRU in Austin, Texas; Tiffany Sagucio at PBS Hawaiʻi’ in Honolulu, HI; and Jaylah Moore-Ross at WETA in Arlington, VA. Their work and training in local newsrooms honors the memory and legacy of pioneering journalist and PBS NewsHour co-anchor and managing editor Gwen Ifill.

 

Tiffany Sagucio graduated from Kauaʻi High School this year and will be attending the University of Hawaiʻi at Manoa to study journalism.

 

Kauaʻi High School graduate Tiffany Sagucio

Tiffany Sagucio

 

“Going into high school, I never expected becoming active in my digital media class,” said Sagucio. “I came to realize that everyone has their own story to share, and so do I. This class has shaped me to be optimistic, caring, and hardworking, like Gwen Ifill.”

 

Sagucio’s teacher, Leah Aiwohi, says the passion Sagucio developed for media and storytelling is inspiring.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
HIKI NŌ Class of 2018 Special, Part 3 of 4

HIKI NŌ Class of 2018 — Part 3 of 4

 

This is the third of four specials in which outstanding HIKI NŌ graduates from the Class of 2018 gathered at PBS Hawai‘i to discuss their HIKI NŌ experiences and how they feel the skills they learned from HIKI NŌ will help them in college, the workplace and life.

 

Part 3 features Katherine Swor, who graduated from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui and is now majoring in elementary education at Saint Martin’s College in Lacey, Washington; Caleb Casinas, who graduated from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu and is now majoring in accounting and management at Norwich University in Vermont; and Haven Luper-Jasso, who graduated from Kaua‘i High School in Līhu‘e and is now majoring in film production at Chapman University in Orange, California.

 

 

To start the show, each graduate shows a HIKI NŌ story that they worked on and discusses what they learned from the experience of working on that particular story. Katherine presents her story “Bi-Polar Artist,” about a young woman who uses her art to express herself and cope with her bi-polar disorder. Caleb shows “Heart Over Height,” about a high school student who excels in soccer, despite the physical limitations brought on by a rare form of dwarfism. Haven presents her story “Bethany Hamilton,” which she created as a 7th grader at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School, about the Kaua‘i surfer who became a celebrity after losing an arm in a shark attack.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
HIKI NŌ Class of 2018 Special, Part 2 of 4

HIKI NŌ Episode #923: Class of 2018 Part 2 of 4

 

This is the second of four specials in which outstanding HIKI NŌ graduates from the Class of 2018 gathered at PBS Hawaiʻi to discuss their HIKI NŌ experiences and how they feel the skills they learned from HIKI NŌ will help them in college, the workplace and life.

 

 

This episode features Tyler Bright, who graduated from Waiʻanae High School in West Oʻahu and is now majoring in biology at Chaminade University in Honolulu; Ronald Crivello-Kahihikolo, who graduated from Konawaena High School on the Kona side of Hawaiʻi Island and is now majoring in journalism at Emerson College in Boston; and Marlena Lang, who graduated from Kauaʻi High School in Līhue and is now majoring in broadcast journalism at Biola University in Southern California.

 

To start off the show, each graduate shows a HIKI NŌ story that they worked on and discusses what they learned from the experience of working on that particular story. Tyler presents her story “Voyaging Through Time,” about how members of the Polynesian Voyaging Society are passing their knowledge to the next generation. Ronald shows “The Red-Headed Hawaiian,” about a fair-skinned, red-headed Native Hawaiian who shed his unmotivated attitude toward school when he decided he wanted to become a doctor. Marlena cites her story “The Fact of You,” a personal essay about the search for one’s own truth in this often superficial age of social media and 24/7 news coverage.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 29 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 30 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.