Kaua‘i

HIKI NŌ
#1007 – The 2018 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge – Middle School Division

 

This special edition features stories from the Middle School Division of the 2018 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge. On October 19, 2018, ten participating high school teams and twelve participating middle school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the theme “the story behind the food”. Teachers could not provide hands-on help. The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own. The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

  1. How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?
  2. How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?
  3. How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, first place, second place, third place and honorable mention awards were given in both the high school and middle school divisions.

 

The winning middle school stories featured in this episode are:

 

–First Place: The Fall Challenge team from Wai‘anae Intermediate School in West O‘ahu opened their entry with a meal being prepared. The story behind that meal is that it is being prepared by and for residents of Hope Lodge, a Honolulu facility where families of Neighbor Island cancer patients who are on O‘ahu for treatment can stay.

 

–Second Place: Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu told the story of Ali‘itasi Ponder, the woman behind Aunty’s Lil’ Green Hut, an organic, gluten-free food truck on O‘ahu’s North Shore.

 

–Third Place: Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului profiled an organic farmer on Maui.

 

–Honorable Mention: Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School featured two women who met in college and went on to open a baking business together.

 

Also featured:

 

–Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i highlighted Kunana Dairy, which specializes in goat’s milk products.

 

–Volcano School of Arts and Sciences on Hawai‘i Island introduced us to the family behind Dimple Cheek Farm and Café.

 

–Hongwanji Mission School on O‘ahu featured Kahuku Farms.

 

–Kealakehe Intermediate School on Hawai‘i Island told the story of a woman who is inspired to cook by the spirit of her late mother.

 

First place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Second place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Third place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Honorable mention winners will receive $100 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #1005 – Breaking Gender Norms and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

“Breaking Gender Norms”
Students from McKinley High School on O‘ahu introduce us to their school’s quarterback, who happens to be a female. On August 19, 2017, McKinley sophomore Alexandria Buchanan became the first female varsity quarterback to start a game in Hawai‘i. She recounts her progress from playing on the junior varsity team as a freshman to becoming the starting quarterback on the varsity team. “I’m proud I got this far,” says Buchanan, “I never expected to be on the varsity level, let alone starting as their quarterback. I take a lot of pride in it. I take a lot of pride in having my team and my coaches trust in me.” McKinley’s football coach and its athletic director also discuss how more and more females have been playing football in recent years, challenging the old perception that it is a sport strictly for men.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui, introduce us to a female intermediate school student who inspires younger students to embrace the wonders of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math).

 

–Students from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i give us an inside look at their school’s building construction class.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu shine a spotlight on a downtown-Honolulu arts organization: The Arts at Marks Garage.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui High School introduce us to a young woman who has created a program that helps other young women build self-confidence and separate their sense of self-worth from social media.

 

–Students from Waimea High School on Kaua‘i present a profile in courage: a young girl who defeated cancer and gained strength and ambition from the experience.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #1003 – Dancing Goat Sanctuary on Hawai‘i Island and other stories

HIKI NŌ: Episode #1003 - Dancing Goat Sanctuary on Hawai‘i Island and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from Konawaena Middle School and Konawaena High School in Kealakekua join forces to tell the story of the Dancing Goat Sanctuary on Hawai‘i Island. The sanctuary is situated on an organic farm and is dedicated to providing abused, orphaned and abandoned goats with a safe environment in which to thrive. Youth and animal advocate Shawna Gunnarson utilizes the goats for an afterschool program at the sanctuary that teaches students how to treat animals compassionately, setting a path for both animals and youth to build lasting connections.

 
Program

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i show how to take simple steps towards developing your own personal style.

 

–Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui show how to get started learning American Sign Language.

 

–Also from Baldwin, the story of a fitness coach who overcame his own personal struggles to become a motivating force in peoples’ lives.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae Intermediate School on O‘ahu introduce us to a teacher who has turned a sustainable garden into a special place of learning.

 

–Students from Pomaika‘i Elementary School on Maui tell us the history of the musubi in Hawai‘i and show us the right way to make one.

 

–Students from Maui High School tell the story of Maui-based painter Philip Sabado and how he re-connected with his Hawaiian culture.

 

 

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX
Community Builders

LONG STORY SHORT: Community Builders

 

Kukui and Gary Maunakea-Forth of O‘ahu, Stacy Sproat-Beck of Kaua‘i and Richard Ha of Hawai‘i Island have built ‘āina-based enterprises focused on building better communities. Hear how these visionaries behind MA‘O Organic Farms, Waipā Foundation and the former Hamakua Springs Country Farms have put their values to work for the greater good.

 

Program

 

This program will be rebroadcast on Sunday, Dec. 23, at 4:00 pm and 11:30 pm.

 

Community Builders Audio

 

Download the Transcript

 

Transcript

 

Richard Ha

We always plan five, ten years out.  We’re always looking for where we need to be in the future.  And we already know that this is happening, it’s gonna get worse, so we’re already moving in that direction.

 

Stacy Sproat-Beck

I remember asking that question when I was in college.  You know; what about a nonprofit?  Because I knew it was there, and it was really an amazing opportunity, you know, to be able to grow this entity that is really for the community, and to take care of the land, and to teach people.

 

Kukui Maunakea-Forth

That’s what I love most about what we do, is that we’re providing this way for young people at an early age to build equity. You know, and it’s not just financial equity, but it’s also equity in terms of the relationships that we’re creating with other people in our community, and with the land.

 

Every entrepreneur seeks professional success.  An uncommon few also aim to build a better community.  Coming up on Long Story Short, our conversations with four individuals who are among a rare breed of business and community leaders.

 

One-on-one engaging conversations with some of Hawai‘i’s most intriguing people: Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox.

 

Aloha mai kākou.  I’m Leslie Wilcox.  On this edition of Long Story Short, community builders.  It takes a remarkable type of person to look beyond their own family, business, and circumstances, maybe beyond their own lifetime, and work to make life better for the broader community over the long haul. To illustrate the impact these individuals can have, we revisit four entrepreneurs running distinctive businesses and nonprofits on three different islands.  We think it’s worth another look at what these innovators have accomplished, putting their vision and values to work, and how they empower people in their communities.

 

First up, Gary and Kukui Maunakea-Forth.  Though they come from different places—New Zealand and Nānākuli, this married couple came together through shared concerns about social conditions on the Wai‘anae Coast of O‘ahu.  And when it came time to start their enterprise in 2001, making money was far from the top priority.  Now the largest organic farm on O‘ahu, the nonprofit MA‘O Organic Farms is providing much more than food.  It’s creating a future for young people in West O‘ahu, and educating leaders for the next generation.

 

Gary Maunakea-Forth

I think the first place it came down to was the fact that we weren’t growing our own food.  We definitely worried about the kids in our community.  But I think because we saw all this land that was being wrongly used, we just kept asking ourselves: Why aren’t we feeding ourselves? And then, we dug a little bit deeper, and one of our friends who’s a soil scientist said it turns out that the soil in Lualualei Valley is one of the most unique and nutrient rich soils in the world.  And we didn’t know that, and kids in our community weren’t taught that.  The connection to the land had been severed. And we still to this day, those kids that come up to the farm, they’ve never been up in the valleys.  And so, I think that’s where it started.  And then, you know, definitely as our kids started to get a little bit older and go through the same problems that other kids were going through, our connection to what kids in Waianae, what kids in rural Hawai‘i are going through started to just, you know, really sort of slap us in the face; you know, the idea that a good public education is very difficult to get in Hawai‘i.

 

We didn’t want to just grow food and eat it ourselves.  We wanted it to be highly marketable.  Because, you know, when we analyzed our community, the state of poverty was multigenerational.  And we thought that if we sell our own food for a premium price, that money wouldn’t go back to our community.  And so, we looked at the kind of social service kinds of things that we had been doing ourselves and that others were doing, and we wanted to add this what at the time was called community-based economic development.  But we wanted to add this economic development layer that now has become social enterprise.  And so, that’s where it started.

 

Kukui Maunakea-Forth

I wanted it to be this great education program, and I wanted, you know, this element of culture and, you know, this element of vocational skills being taught, and this element of community work being done.  And it just didn’t happen like that at all.  It was whatever, you know, resources and people that were sort of there at the time. And it started off as a ten-month-long experience; you know, farm work experience.

 

So, who were you first enrollees?

 

 

 

Kukui Maunakea-Forth

Multi people that we had talked to their parents at Tamura’s.  Or we saw down at the beach park and said: Hey, you know, we’re starting a program; would you guys like to, you know, send your daughter?  Oh, yeah; my daughter’s graduating, and she doesn’t really have plans; sure, we’ll sign her up.

 

Those people that were meant to be there, ended up there.  And, you know, all of us, you know, growing up on the Coast, the fact that there’s only eleven percent that will go to college; that’s a small number.  So, what about the other eighty-eight, ninety percent that aren’t going to college; where are those guys?  And, you know, we thought long and hard about who we wanted to have this opportunity, and to have this experience.  And it was really those that were going to become the leaders. So, this eighteen to twenty-four-year-old Wai‘anae or Nānākuli graduate that had a desire to do something different, and to connect with not only the culture, but with a future in the community.

 

Gary Maunakea-Forth

Almost every young person that has been in touch with MA‘O—and this is pretty much the condition of the Wai‘anae Coast, you know, the federal government calls them at-risk.  And if you look deep at the statistics, you’ll find that Waianae has twice the teen pregnancy rate, twice the substance abuse rate.  All of these indicators are terrible, twice as bad as anywhere else.  And so, most of the kids that come have issues at home, or in their own lives that they’ve got to deal with.  On top of that, you know, we’re told in this society that if you go and get a college education, you can get ahead in life, you know, you can get your American Dream. Most of the kids coming out of the public schools in the State of Hawai‘i and in Wai‘anae are what’s termed remedial. And so, they have to be highly motivated.

 

When we started MA‘O, we wanted to start it with an associate degree program.  That took us three or four years to gain momentum, because when we went to Leeward Community College initially, they were like: Well, let’s do a noncredit program. And so, we started with this ten-month-long program.  And now, the various programs we have through MA‘O are sort of designed to be like a movement, to have this environment of entrepreneurship, of I want to get ahead, I want to work hard, I want to give to my community.

 

Kukui Maunakea-Forth

Over time, you know, we nurture trust, and respect, and love.

 

Gary Maunakea-Forth

And when kids first come to the farm, they generally come because we’re gonna help them pay for college and give them a stipend. The farming, they could live without some of them.

 

So, in 2003, I think, was our first real official ten-person youth leadership training of these young people just straight out of college.  And one of them went through the whole ten-months, and during that ten months he turned eighteen, and he was all over the place.

 

He was just growing up.  And anyway, he stuck it out, and now, he’s still with us, and he’s twenty-five years old.  And he’s now the assistant farm manager.  His name is Manny.  He represents what we believe is the untapped potential of young men in Waianae.  He can run the farm himself.  I’ve seen him talk story with Alan Wong about food, talk story with Ed Kenney about food.  At one of the fundraisers, he was talking about the farm to Pierre Omidyar, who’s a billionaire.  He represents, I believe, what a young farmer in the State of Hawai‘i should be.  Not just a person who’s able to toil in the fields, but he can talk about the vegetables, he can cook the vegetables.

 

You know, we’ve tried to take the farming part of it, and make it sexy, and make it interesting.  And the best and easiest way to do that is to allow the young people to do, firstly, a bit of everything.

 

M-hm.

 

So, they get typecast weeding a lot.

 

But they also get to do all the other jobs. You know, packing vegetables to go to Town Restaurant, or to go to Whole Foods is one of those things where they start to see the pride in doing it.

 

And the connection.

 

And get connection; yeah.  And so, if they’re at KCC Farmers Market selling vegetables, that’s the ultimate job.  You know, we’re hoping now that the next step for us is that especially some of the young people who really all of a sudden like farming will be farmers, and will either farm larger spaces with us, or go off by themselves.

 

Kukui Maunakea-Forth

I think that’s what I love most about what we do, is that we’re providing this way for young people at an early age to build equity. You know, and it’s not just financial equity, but it’s also equity in terms of the relationships that we’re creating with other people in our community, and with the land that feeds them.

 

Since 2009 when this interview first aired, MAO Organic Farms has continued to do well.  In 2018, a record twenty-one students graduated from the program with high school and college degrees, including from a new four-year program in sustainable community food systems at UH West Oahu.  While we enjoy the vegetables, MAO is really growing the leaders of tomorrow.

 

Now, we head over to Kauai’s North Shore, where Stacy Sproat-Beck is pursuing some similar goals at the WaipāFoundation.  The Waipāeducational mission includes connecting people to the land, using natural resources responsibly, strengthening family, cultural, and community ties, and preserving a way of life.  In 2014, Stacy Sproat-Beck told us why she was a world away from the work her business school professors expected her to pursue.

 

You went to USC, a very fine business school.  What was the experience of going to college at USC like?  I mean, there are a lot of wealthy scions, you know, sons and daughters of magnates.

 

It was kind of a culture shock.  You know, not so much being in a city that size, or in a school that size, because you know, I’d lived here for six years in Honolulu, and gone to Kamehameha.  And this is a big city, too.  But definitely, USC was kind of a culture shock for me, and I didn’t fit in that well. And you know, I’d raise my hand and go: What about family business?  And they go: Oh, no, no, no; don’t talk about that.  You know, family business is really hard.  And I go: Oh, what about nonprofits? And they go: Nonprofits?  You know, maybe we’ll bring somebody in to talk about nonprofits, but nonprofits aren’t really where the money is.  And so, it was kind of a different thing for me. But I still feel like I gained a lot of knowledge and important skills from going there, definitely.  It was an amazing education.

 

When you came home, I think you were aware of what was going on, but weren’t there for a lot of the fireworks.  There was a lot of militance about the way land was going on the North Shore, the push for resort development, and the move away from a rural lifestyle.

 

On Kaua‘i?

 

M-hm.

 

Yeah.  It seems like that was happening.  Yeah; that was happening throughout our childhood and youth, and my parents were really active, and my family was really active and fighting development, and wanting to manage it, really, and not just let it get out of hand.

 

And in fact, they were fighting Kamehameha Schools, where you’d attended, owner of Waipa.

 

Yeah; in the early 80s then, yes, Kamehameha became one of the entities that wanted to develop their landholdings there on the North Shore.  They were in development mode, and so, their plans for Waipāand Lumahai were golf courses, resort communities. Back then, it was all about developing the land so they could make money to support the school at Kapālama and the Estate.  Eventually, after four years of activism and negotiation, and the default of the potential developer, they were able to obtain a lease from Kamehameha for the sixteen-hundred-acre ahupua‘a of Waipā, which is an intact watershed.  It’s amazing.

 

I moved home in ’92, and I really started helping at Waipāin ’94.  And it was really just difficult.  There were a lot of different challenges and issues.

 

And you were doing this as a volunteer?

 

Yeah.  Well, farming with my husband on the side, helping manage Waipāon a volunteer basis.  And then also, I think I was doing promotions for a boat company to actually make money to pay my bills.  When Kamehameha went through strategic planning in 2000-2001, they changed their whole viewpoint on land management and revenue-generating lands, versus lands for culture and education.  And also, kind of right around that same time, all of these other difficulties that we had just sort of went away.

 

What do you do on the sixteen-hundred-acre property?

 

My dad guys envisioned that the original founders, it was to be a land base for the practice and perpetuation of Hawaiian culture. And so, that was their vision. And so, we continue to perpetuate that today by doing programs for kids that connect them with the land, and also, you know, we do enrichment programs and leadership, and cultural programs. And they’re in the garden and harvesting, and also just swimming in the streams and maybe doing a lot of the things that I did as a kid, that we all did.  And I feel like what that does today is, it connects us back to the earth, when a lot of us are just busy living somewhat urban lives.  It’s helping them to make the connection.  So, we do programs for kids.  We do resource management.  You know, we manage learning sites, and sites that we’re restoring. We have a fishpond that we’re restoring along the coast, and then we’ve got lo‘i, taro fields, and gardens, and a native plants nursery.  And then, up in the valley, we’re doing reforestation.  And then, sort of teaching and learning through all of that. And even another thing that’s really amazing to us is that we’ve planted a lot of fruit trees lately, orchards of fruit trees, everything from longan and lychee, to mango, and oranges, and avocado, and ulu, star fruit.  And really to be able to create abundance, lots of food, because you know, we know the importance of having lots of food there, both to feed ourselves and you know, to share with community, and then to market too.  But also being able to take the kids out.  Oh, and mountain apples, too; that’s a big one.  Being able to take the kids out and let them pick their own snacks off the trees.  I mean, we grew up with that, but kids nowadays—

 

They look for a box.

 

It blows their mind when they go out and are able to pick mountain apples and eat them.  It’s just the most amazing experience for them.  And for us, I think, that should be so basic, you know.

 

What’s the goal for WaipāFoundation now in the ahupua‘a?

 

So, our vision is a thriving an abundant ahupua‘a, and a healthy community that’s connected to their resources.  And so, it’s both … yeah, exactly that.  Just thriving and abundant, with land and resources being healthy, and feeding us in many ways, both physically, spiritually, and then also community that is connected to the place that helps to take care of it, and is nourished by it, and also actively manages and takes care of the land.  And I think that’s our vision specifically for Waipā, but also, it’s a larger vision.  You know, Waipācould be just a microcosm of the State or the island, or the world, where everybody is directly connected to the resources that feed them and take care of them.

 

Our next guest may not have started out with quite the same intentions as Stacy Sproat-Beck or the Maunakea-Forths.  Richard Ha went into the family farming business, and the founded his own farm on the Hāmākua Coast of Hawai‘i Island.  Along the way, Ha found that his business expertise and entrepreneurial vision prepared him to make progress on challenging issues like sustainability, food security, and renewable energy.  Ha always tries to stay ahead of curve, anticipating the next big need. It all started with the can-do attitude he learned from his dad.

 

When you saw your dad farming, and you were playing with tomatoes, did you think: I want to grow up and be a farmer?

 

No.  Actually, what happened was, I ended up wanting to go into business or into having some kind of organization to be in charge of.  And the reason that happened was because Dad used tell stories when I was about ten years old.  We had this kitchen table that was like a picnic table, with a bench and everything. And he would tell stories about impossible situations.  You know, a business situation, or he had all kinds of different situations.  And it would come down to he came up against a stonewall, there was no way to figure it out, and he’d pound the table, and the dishes would all fly.  He would say—boom; Not no can; can!  I remember that pretty clearly.

 

Not no can; can.

 

Yeah.

 

It’s about problem-solving and the will to overcome the problem.

 

Yeah.  It was just a given that you just don’t come up to a problem and look at and say: Oh, that’s it.  You know, there was always a way around it.

 

What were you gonna do with your accounting degree?

 

You know, actually, I didn’t really know.  I just knew that I had an accounting degree, and if anything came up, I was gonna do it.  But it just so happened Pop asked me to come back and run his chicken farm. I said: Okay, well, I don’t have anything planned; I’ll do that.  So, I came back, helped him run the poultry farm, and in the course of that, met the supermarket people, learned how marketing and that kinda stuff worked.

 

And you learned from the ground, up on that end; right?

 

Yeah; yeah.  I mean, we raised chickens when we were little, but the business end of it was different, you know.  And with an accounting degree, it helped me to analyze stuff.  And so, what happened was, we had forty acres, and twenty-five of it was in the chicken farm, so we had some extra land.  And so, we needed to find out what could we do with no more money.  ‘Cause I only had a three hundred dollar credit card.  Back then it was hard to get a three hundred dollar credit card. So, we started doing some research, and found out that there was about six million pounds of Chiquita Bananas being imported into Hawai‘i.  So, I said: Oh, man, if we could get into that, we should be able to do okay.  So, we started trading chicken manure for banana keiki, and started two acres.

 

At what point did you have your own farm?

 

Well, yeah; that was my dad’s farm, and we made it into a four-way corporation with my brothers.  And then, from there, I went to Kapoho to lease some land over there. And that’s when it started, maybe two years after we started the first banana farm.  And then, when the sugar plantations started closing down, we were able to move closer in to Hilo, at Kea‘au.  So, we moved the farm there.  At Kea‘au, we expanded to three hundred acres, and by then, we became the largest banana farm in the State.

 

Are you confident that local people will buy local produce, even if it’s more expensive?

 

Well, you know, it’s really what we need to do to support our local farmers, because to be food-secure, farmers gotta make money. And come the time when we feel like this is really a serious situation, it’ll happen.  And everybody’s talking about food security.  Now, how do we do that?  And the answer is, if the farmer can make money, the farmer will farm. So, it doesn’t get much more complex than that.  So, in an effort to figure out ways to help farmers make money, you know, with the help of the Department of Ag and the legislators, and a bunch of people, we pushed through legislation so that farmers could get cheap loans, low interest, long-term loans for renewable energy projects.  And how we look at it is how it affects our workers, our community, and the environment.  Every Thursday, our workers can come and just pick up all the different things we grow—bananas and tomatoes, and whatever, you know, as much as they need for their family.  And we have profit sharing, although it’s been tough the last few years.  We have profit sharing, and we want to look, you know, toward whatever we can do to help them with the food side of it. Because it’s hard for us to raise our workers’ salaries, because we can’t raise the price.  Everybody’s having hard time.  So, we have to figure out other ways to help our workers.

 

Keaukaha Elementary School, a Hawaiian Homelands community, and a school that was in the academic basement for twenty years; you adopted a class there.

 

Yeah.  What happened was, I volunteered to be on this thirty meter telescope subcommittee on the Hawaii Island Economic Development Board.  And so, when you talk about telescopes, you automatically talk about the culture.  Maua Kea, you need to talk about the culture.  If you talk about the culture, you end up at Keaukaha.  It’s a seventy-five-year-old Hawaiian Homes community.  And so, that’s where I ended up.  Yeah; so I went over there, talked to Kumu Lehua about telescopes, and had to learn a lot the culture.  I didn’t know as much as I do now.  I was mostly worried about farming.  But you know, the more I got into it, the more I needed to learn.  And then, what was ironic was, here I am on the thirty meter telescope subcommittee, and you’re standing in Keaukaha, you look at the mountain; there’s hundreds of millions of dollars of investment up there.  You look back at the school and the community. So, you know, there’s nothing here of tangible relationship to that.  But whatever the case, we decided this no can; we had to do something.

 

What do you see yourself doing in ten years?

 

You know, it’s hard to say what it’ll be, but I’m pretty sure it’ll be something that I can’t imagine now.  Because we always end up doing something that’s new and different.  Yeah; so I expect that it’ll be something new and different, but it’ll be something, for sure.

 

And it’ll be in farming?

 

I can’t even say that.  I don’t want to just say one particular thing.  But it really has to do with where our society is going, what our circumstance will be.

 

Since this interview first aired in 2008, we can now tell you what Richard Ha is doing.  In 2016, he closed Hāmākua Springs Country Farms and was awarded one of the first Hawaii licenses to grow and sell medical marijuana with a company called Lau Ola.  In the fall of 2018, he left Lau Ola after steering the company through its startup phase.  He said he’ll continue in the agriculture and energy industries.

 

Richard Ha, Stacy Sproat-Beck, and Gary and Kukui Maunakea-Forth all continue to grow their own enterprises, while building better communities across our state. We thank them for their vision and can-do attitude, and for sharing their stories with us.  We hope they’ve inspired you.  Mahalo for watching.  For Long Story Short and PBS Hawai‘i, I’m Leslie Wilcox.  Aloha nui.

 

For audio and written transcripts of all episodes of Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox, visit PBSHawaii.org.  To download free podcasts of Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox, go to the Apple iTunes Store or visit PBSHawaii.org.

 

Kukui Maunakea-Forth

There’s no one right way.  And we’ve all sort of figured out this thing that we bring everything to the table, you put it down, if your idea is better than ours, then hey, we’re gonna go with your idea.  And that’s how it even happened with that very first class.

 

Stacy Sproat-Beck

Things have really just grown like crazy since then, and gone in an amazing direction.  I feel like the lessons learned from those really hard times are kind of what maybe grounds me and the organization in sort of humility and remembering that things don’t always come easy.

 

Richard Ha

Pop taught us a lot of lessons, and it had to do with survival.  Just do what you gotta do, and plan for the future, and you know, make decisions. You gotta do it, do it now, kinda thing like that.

 

And not no can; can.

 

Yeah; absolutely.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #1002 – Sustainable Boost and other stories

HIKI NŌ: Episode #1002

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i introduce us to an unconventional food source in the U.S. – crickets! Kaua‘i farmer Lourdes Torres recalls first hearing about the idea of insects as food from her grandmother. “She would point at them and say, ‘That’s food.’” And we thought, “Yeah, maybe, if there was famine.” But as co-founder of food manufacturing company Sustainable Boost, Torres has developed a cricket/taro blend powder that is high in protein and is said to have a mild, nutty flavor. She raises the crickets on a plant-based diet, and the insects have a much smaller impact on the environment than other forms of livestock.

 
Program

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a young woman who bravely faces her battle with depression every day.

 

Students from Waimea Elementary School on Hawai‘i make their HIKI NŌ debut by showing us how to make pickled mango. (Waimea Elementary is only the fourth elementary school to have a project air on HIKI NŌ.)

 

Students from Wai‘anae High School on O‘ahu introduce us to ‘ukulele player Nick Acosta, who has become a virtuoso on the instrument, despite the fact that he has only one complete arm.

 

Students from Kaua‘i High School in Līhu‘e take us to a local establishment that serves coffee and also serves the community.

 

Students from ‘Ilima Intermediate School on O‘ahu show us how a community pool has become a special gathering place for those who swim there.

 

And students from Island School on Kaua‘i show us how an invasive plant is being eradicated from Kaua‘i’s waterways.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Aloha Atlanta: HIKI NŌ at the 2016 Student Television Network Competition

HIKI NŌ: Aloha Atlanta: HIKI NŌ at the Student Television Network Competition

 

This half-hour documentary captures the experience of Hawai‘i’s HIKI NŌ schools at a national digital video competition through the eyes of students from Kaua‘i’s Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School. The 2016 Student Television Network Competition took place in Atlanta, Georgia, and brought together thousands of middle and high school students from across the country to compete in time-intensive, deadline-driven contests in the production of news features, anchor presentations, short films, public service announcements and other forms of visual storytelling. Although the Chiefess students went to Atlanta with the intention of winning, the lessons they learned along the way, including teamwork, collaboration, grace under pressure, and the importance of friendship, were more valuable than the awards they took home. The Hawai‘i schools combined took home 34 awards and cheered for one another as one team (Team Hawai‘i) during the awards ceremony.

 

Program

 

 

 



LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX
David Kuraoka

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX: David Kuraoka

 

Growing up barefoot and carefree in the wild outdoors of Kaua‘i, no one predicted David Kuraoka would find his calling in the confines of a ceramics studio.

 

 

Even after becoming a widely celebrated ceramics artist, he managed to straddle two very different worlds: his job as an art professor at San Francisco State University and summers spent in the vast wilderness of Kalalau Valley on Kaua‘i’s Nā Pali Coast.

 

This program will be rebroadcast on Sunday, Sept. 30, at 4:00 pm and 11:30 pm.

 

David Kuraoka Audio

 

Download the Transcript

 

Transcript

What’s the biggest piece?

 

You know, I have large pieces, but they’re made in sections.  I worked in a ceramic factory that made industrial ceramic; bricks, sewer pipes.  One of my student’s family owned the factory, so he gave me the privilege.  He gave me a studio in the back, and I could work on these large two-ton sewer pipes.  You know, machines pick ‘em all up.  But I couldn’t cross the bridges in Hā‘ena and Hanalei, so …

 

Two-ton?

 

I couldn’t pick ‘em up; right?

 

That’s the weight of a car; right?

 

Yes.

 

Two tons.

 

Yeah; these are big pieces.  So, they’re big, like that.

 

He’s known for creating larger-than-like sculptures. But what shaped the life of this Kauai-born artist?  David Kuraoka, next, on Long Story Short.

 

One-on-one engaging conversations with some of Hawai‘i’s most intriguing people: Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox.

 

Aloha mai kākou.  I’m Leslie Wilcox.  David Kuraoka grew up in Hanamā‘ulu and Līhu‘e, Kaua‘i, far from the art scene in San Francisco, where he found his calling. He is a celebrated artist, known for both his large-scale abstract sculptures cast out of bronze that sometimes weigh more than a ton, handmade ceramic clay slabs, and glazed porcelain works created on a potter’s wheel.  For more than forty years, he’s shaped works of art, and artists, as a professor and former head of the San Francisco State University Ceramics Department.  You can find Kuraoka’s sculptures in places like the Hawaii Convention Center, the Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum, and the White House art collection.  David Kuraoka knows his way around posh city buildings and art galleries, and he has remained comfortable in an environment without walls: the outdoors in his native Kaua‘i.

 

My dad worked for the plantation.  I think my grandparents worked for the plantation.  This was my grandmother’s house, and she had raised six daughters and my father in the camp.  And as they got married, my aunts moved away, but my dad stayed there with my mom.  And so, we were there until we bought our house in Līhu‘e, in the city.  It was primarily a Filipino labor camp.  And it was like a Filipino camp with three or four Japanese families.  They were primarily Filipino bachelors, so I was raised by all these bachelors who took care of me until I was about ten, maybe.

 

Never felt lonely, I bet.

 

No, no. They were really, really nice.  I got used to their food, and they taught me some language.  I was raised around cockfighting and chickens.  It was very plantation.  I was lucky; in Hanamā‘ulu there was a beach, nice beach, Hanamā‘ulu Beach.  And there was a mountain, Kalepa Heights, right behind the camp.  So, I got to run in the mountains a lot, and I got to swim a lot.  So, it was kind of a great place for a young guy to grow up.

 

Your dad seems like he might have been kind of a larger-than-life personality.  What was his column about?

 

Sidelines Kuraoka; it was a social column, three-dot journalism kinda.  And him and my mom would type out.  On Sundays, they would work in the yard, because that was kinda the thing they did.  They had a really nice yard.  But they would come in Sundays and type out the column with this old manual typewriter; whack out the column.  Because it was published only every Wednesday, once a week.

 

When you’re the three-dot columnist, the only three-dot columnist in the area, you’re kind of a celeb yourself.

 

Kinda; yeah.

 

So, that was your dad; right?

 

Yeah; that was my dad.  Yeah.

 

Very connected.

 

Connected; yeah.  He met a lot of celebrities; right?  Because he was like the reporter on Kauai.  So, if Frank Sinatra, Mitzi Gaynor, you know, like they made movies there and stuff, so he was right there with the stars and celebrities.  The princess from Japan, you know.

 

M-hm.

 

So, he had an interesting life.

 

He was active politically.  What did exactly did he do?

 

Yes, he was active politically.  And he would support Republicans and Democrats.  But he was at one point, Kauai’s Republican chairman or representative, I believe.  He was Hiram Fong’s campaign manager and Hiram Fong’s representative.  I know that, because I was kinda high school by then. In fact, he had stacks of Hiram Fong tee-shirts that said: Fong, Man of the Pacific.  And I ended up with ten of ‘em, and that’s all I wore at the community college, and people used to call me Fong.

 

Because I had this Fong on.  And my dad was also campaign manager for Richard Nixon on Kauai.  And he had passed away, my dad passed away right before Watergate, so he never experienced Watergate.  So, lucky for him, because his hero, you know.

 

Now, to be a Republican on Kaua‘i, that was swimming against the tide, wasn’t it?

 

Yes; yes and no.  Like he explained to me later, as I questioned him about, because I was kinda on the opposite side, he said that, you know, he worked in the plantation office, and all his bosses were Republicans.  And he said: I don’t want to work in the fields, you know.

 

I see.

 

It makes more sense for me to be Republican and work in the office.  Which made sense, you know.  And I’m like: Mm, okay.

 

Did you have to switch schools when you went to Lihue?

 

No; no, they were close enough.  My mom taught school, so I would go to school with her.  And fortunately, when I moved to Līhue, we lived on the edge of a valley, a very big valley, Kapaia Valley.  And I had a whole valley to play with there, too.  And there was a big river in the bottom of the valley.  So, I ran around carefree, barefooted.  Until I went to the ninth grade, I never wore shoes.  I rebelled; I didn’t want to wear shoes. And in the ninth grade, they sent me home for not wearing shoes.  So then, I had to get shoes.

 

What kind of shoes did you get?

 

Oh really ugly, big bulldog shoes.

 

Not very fashion conscious.

 

With your mom a teacher, did that compel you to be a good student?

 

Actually, I was never a very good student.

 

Did you have art classes in school, in public school?

 

No; no. Actually, I wanted to take some classes, but it wasn’t really emphasized much.  They really forced me into chemistry, into physics, and you know, I really kinda wasn’t interested.  You know, I’m more interested now, because I understand it now, but while I was a local kid, I wasn’t that interested.  I was more interested in surfing and running around the jungles.  I was more a outdoor kid, and I almost resented having to be forced to take chemistry and stuff.  Because it didn’t make sense to me, or it didn’t make sense to my life or how it was gonna help my life, you know.

 

David Kuraoka says he did not apply himself in high school, nor did he have the grades to go to a four-year university. So, at the urging of his parents, he enrolled in San Jose City College to study architecture.  His first few semesters in a strange new place did not go so well.

 

Okay; so you arrive in San Jose at your new college. What are you wearing?

 

Um, pretty much Hawai‘i cl—uh, Kauai clothes.  I graduated in 1964 from Kauai High School, and uh,

There’s not much TV on Kauai in 1964.  Uh, and what’s there is very blurry.  An—and our—our house didn’t have TV.  So, I go to San Jose, and I don’t have a car, I don’t have many friends. But who I—whoever I speak to in the cafeteria or any friends I make, they’re cracking jokes or they’re talking about things that I don’t understand.  And they’re picking it up from television culture; I Love Lucy, um … uh, you know, I don’t know, Hogan Heroes, or The Fugitive, or—you know, an—and I—I don’t know these things, because I don’t have a TV.  And it’s common to everyone except me.  So, I—I but a twenty-five-dollar TV, and I sit there for almost six weeks, day and night.  And still watch TV, but six—day and night, to try to catch up on culture,

 

Oh, like the worst time in my life.  You know, there was that adjustment.  I used to wear slippers and bright shirts.  I still wear bright shirts.  But I used to wear bright shirts, and tee-shirts.  Just culturally, I was not in tune to the rest of the world, I felt. I mean, I tried to be, because I didn’t want to be lonesome.  I had no car, and so I would look for other Hawaii kids, you know.  So, us Hawai‘i kids would all just hang together, so it would make it more comfortable or make it more, you know, okay.  But every time there was a summer break and kids went home, only half the kids would come back.  And so, the next summer, then the other half.  So pretty soon, I was pretty much alone again.  And then, until I found art, I didn’t really have much friends, or much social contact.

 

So, how did you find art?  How did you find ceramics?  I mean, did you pass by the room, or …

 

Yeah, really by accident.  I had to take a couple basic art classes to fulfill my architect degree, and so, took drawing.  And in my drawing class, my friends were taking ceramics.  So, I would go over during the break and watch them.  And I thought: Gee, I want to make some cups for my friends, my classmates back in Hawai‘i; I could do that, you know.  And once I did it, it felt so …something was very compelling and drew me to it.  And the things were very ugly, the stuff I made in the beginning.

 

You know, it wasn’t accomplished at all.  And by the time I got good enough, or good enough to give away, I was kinda hooked.  Somehow, ceramics made sense to me, and it was something I could do.  You know, I wonder sometimes when I watch television and stuff about people with dyslexia and stuff.  And I think: Oh, I think that looks like me.  You know, like just one part of my brain or something, and another part wasn’t working as well as another part.  You know.  I’m much more visual.

 

Now, when you started taking ceramics classes, and then all your art classes for your major, I mean, you were with a different subculture of students.

 

Yes.

 

Was that different, to be with all the art students?

 

Yes and no.  Because I tried really hard.  When they went out drinking beer, I wouldn’t go out drinking beer; I was still working. When they went to lunch, I was still working.  And I wanted it so badly that whenever the professor was gone—because I didn’t take classes in the beginning, I didn’t know about it—I would sneak in at lunchtime. Then I would wait for him to leave, and when he would leave for the evening, I would sneak in at night.  I lived right next to the college, so I could stay there as late as possible.  And any time he wasn’t there, I would sneak in and work.  And then one day, he called my name, so then I knew … oh. I mean, I sweated, because like, oh, no, I’m busted.  You know. But then, he accepted me, so then I was so glad.  And you know, the next semester, I enrolled, so I was okay.  It changed me a lot in the first couple years.  I think eighteen to twenty, I really grew up there.  I had one set of mind, one kind of cultured mind when I was in Hawaii, which I’m really, really happy I grew up here.  And then, suddenly out of loneliness, out lack of focus or focus, I’m not sure, but I went through a metamorphosis kind of the first two years, for two or three years.   And then I started a metamorphosis realizing that the rest of my life, I had to seek and look.  And I was quite comfortable on Kauai; I wasn’t really looking, because I was happy. You know.  And then, it almost takes an unhappy to then try to find the rest of your way.

 

At San Jose City College, and later at San Jose State University, David Kuraoka reveled in his newfound passion for art. Although he was discouraged by family and college counselors from going into fine arts, he pursued ceramics and quickly became a rising star in the art world.  In 1976, he became a professor at San Francisco State University, where he could practice his ceramic arts while helping to shape aspiring artists.

 

Yes; I was fortunate enough to be paid for what I like doing.  And I learned a lot from my students.  I mean, everybody’s so different; right?  They bring so much life into it.  I mean, I was just fortunate to be in that position.

 

So, is it more than forty years as a professor at San Francisco State University?

 

Yes; just a little bit more than forty years.  I started when I was young.  I got my MA about twenty-four, twenty-five, and I won a number of awards, and I got recognized, so they hired me right away, which I was fortunate.  And then, I was there until I retired.  One thing I realized when I was teaching, that many students came from many small towns across America, like Lihue.  You know, once realized that, I thought: Oh, I’m just like everybody else.  You know, it’s not like: Oh, I’m just this small town kid that forever, my whole life, I’m always gonna be small town, and everybody else knows everything, and I’m not going know.  You know. Then I found out that they’re not from San Francisco, they’re from Missouri, and Oklahoma, and you know, Nebraska, and all these small towns.  And you ask them, their towns are smaller than Līhu‘e.  And you’re here, you know, and there’s one or two of ‘em that would leave the town. Most of them would stay in the small town, but these are the brave ones, and then they would come to college, and seeking their fortune, you know.  Lot of the times, my life revolved around my work, and I would teach Tuesday, Thursday, Friday.  But I had the other four days to do my own work.  So, that was rather fortunate.  Also, when I became head of the department, I could buy all the equipment I wanted, I could set up the whole studio, and do my work along with the students.  That was very fortunate.

 

Did people on Kauai get surprised when they saw what happened to you?  Like what you did on the mainland.

 

My mom laughs sometimes, you know.

 

She laughs?

 

Yeah; she didn’t expect it, you know.  Because she taught her whole life, and she goes: Oh, yeah, that person was a good student.  She judges them, knowing them from teaching, you know.  And she was always a good student.  I could always tell she was gonna succeed, or he was gonna succeed. And I turned to her and go: You thought I would ever be a professor?  And she laughed.  She goes: No. So … you know.

 

So, the hallmarks of your work are abstract?

 

Abstract, pretty much.

 

And I’ve heard the word bulbous described.

 

Bulbous; yeah.

 

Like, is that the art term for …

 

No.  But yes, it has life.  I mean, I think it’s round.  I look at my more round full things as like feminine, more feminine.  And the more cylindrical stiffer things as male.  I mean, sometimes, when I look back, I’m not doing it on purpose, but I can see more female in some, and more male in—

 

That’s interesting.  And then very clean lines, too.

 

Yes. I called it California slick.

 

California slick.

 

I kinda made it up, but it’s kinda true.  When I went through my education at that particular time, it was minimalism, and abstract expressionism.  And so, I’m kinda some place in there.  And then, so my work is pretty slick.  It’s not rough.  I don’t do rough textures, I don’t do … it’s organically vital, but it’s clean.

 

You know, it sounds like when you sit down to throw, do you know what you’re gonna make?

 

Many times, yes.  Many times, I conceive it all the way to the end.

 

Oh, you do.

 

I do. When I’m sitting there to throw, I already know how I’m gonna finish it.

 

Okay.  ‘Cause I’m thinking of third grade, I’m making an ashtray.  You know, that kind.  So, you have an idea.  But sometimes, it sounds like the pieces go organic on you.

 

Yes. Yeah; there’s a range.  There’s a range in there that I have freedom to do. But I know I’m gonna finish it in a particular way.  Because the clay body or how I’m beginning dictates the end, so I already figured it out.

 

In 1987, at the young age of thirty-five, David Kuraoka was recognized by the Honpa Hongwanji of Hawaii as a living treasure of Hawai‘i for his art.  Kuraoka remained connected to Kauai, and would return during his summer breaks to embrace his childhood love of nature and a slower pace of life.  He would often spend months roughing it in the wilderness of Kalalau on Kauai’s NāPali Coast.

 

I always lived on Kauai four months out of the year, sometimes more.  You know, so I would do an academic year, then I’d move back to Kauai.  Sometimes I thought I was commuting from Kauai to California, because that was my base on Kauai.  But I would spend my summers on the NāPali Coast.  And sometimes one month and up to three months.  I would sometimes pack my bags in California, and then come in, say hello to my parents or my mom, and then off to Kalalau.  And I’d buy all my food, everything would be packed, and I would just go off to Kalalau.

 

And were you doing art in Kalalau?

 

Lot of it.  And some sketches, but also mostly to slow it all down, to understand humanity.  You know, you want fire, you get wood.  You want water, you go to the waterfall.  I mean, it was like very basic, and it kind of brought reality, a different reality, made me feel like I understood the person living in a grass shack in Africa, or or taking me back in time a hundred years or two hundred, you know, like how humanity lived, you know, most of humankind lived, the way I lived, I felt.

 

How did you get to Kalalau?  Did you paddle or get dropped off?

 

No, no. In the beginning, yes, I would take a helicopter, boat, walk.  I mean, I did everything.  I walked, I hiked a lot.  Sometimes, some summers, I’d hike.  I’d run out and go to the dentist, and he would take a mold, and run back in, run out, then next week put the false tooth in, and come back the next week put the permanent.  You know, like I’d go back and forth; run back and forth.

 

So, I’ve spent time in Kalalau too, and I mean, it’s just stupendously beautiful.  And isn’t it illegal to live in Kalalau?

 

You know, for a while it was in litigation between the State and the Robinsons. You know, so for about seven or eight years, nobody owned it.  So, it was pretty free for all.  So, that was a great time, was no law; right?  It’s kinda scary.  But then I wasn’t scared at all.  Was just open.  And so, at the end of that period, the State parks and the law came.  But I was the only local kid in there.  So, they were anxious to be friends, and they knew my dad, they knew my family.  And I knew all the trails, I knew all the fishing spots.

 

 

So, I can remember there used to be like young people living naked in the back, with a wood-burning pizza maker.  I mean, were you there for all that stuff?

 

Yeah, yeah, kind of; yeah.  They were all my friends; yeah.

 

During David Kuraoka’s return trips to Kaua‘i, he had a business relationship with a contemporary art dealer who made the Garden Isle her home.  As time went on, that relationship grew into a romantic one.

 

Carol had owned the Contemporary Gallery, really one of the better ones in Hawai‘i, and very successful.  And she had been my dealer for fifteen years.  But I never spent much time in Līhu‘e; I would uh, go to Kalalau.  So I knew her, and she helped me, and she had shows for me, but I wasn’t around town.  Then we met, and it was just right.  After so many years, we got together.  And just when we got together, Hurricane Iniki happened and destroyed all the buildings, pretty much destroyed all the buildings, destroyed the galleries.  And it was okay, because we then got married and moved to San Francisco.

 

Because we couldn’t rebuild the galleries, because there was no houses to put art in on Kauai anyway.

 

Oh, that’s right.  Yeah; it was just terrible.

 

Yeah, it was over; that area was over.

 

You sort of knew her and did business with her for many years.  What was the difference when you got together?

 

I think it was just timing.  I mean, on both of our parts.  I mean, I wonder too, sometimes.  But I’m just lucky I got together with her, because we’ve been together and happy ever since.  So …

 

That’s wonderful.  And that turned out to be the end of her art gallery era in Līhue.

 

Yes.

 

But off you went to San Francisco.

 

Yes; yes.  And then, I’m her art interest now, so lucky for me.  I mean, I was doing art, so she’s very interested in art.  So, she knows more artists than me.  She’s much more well-read than I am.  She would do things by reading.  I was trying to teach her ceramics, we were doing little craft projects together, and she would tell me what to do.  And I said: How do you know?  You know, I teach ceramics.  She goes: I read it in a book.  So, she would read all the books and had the answers, you know, and I do it through experience.  But that was kinda funny.

 

After more than forty years at San Francisco State University, David Kuraoka retired and now spends the majority of his time in Hā‘ena, Kauai, just down the road from the trailhead that leads to his beautiful beloved Kalalau. He’s still active in ceramics, and has also turned his attention to designing houses.

 

Every artist should build a house.  It’s so sculptural, so you’re conceiving so much, you know.  And so visual, and it makes sense, you know.  And then, you look at any building, you go: Hm.  You know, it helps you visualize the whole process, and appreciate it from the inside out more

 

Are the houses you design like the art you do? Is it … California Slick?

 

Kind of.  All dark green.  All the houses are the same color, including my mother’s.

 

All dark green.

 

All dark green, and white inside.  No white for the outside, because the mold.  You know, and black roof, because the mold will turn it black anyway.  Just all this practical stuff.

 

And then, what else besides white inside?

 

White inside; yeah.  Hardwood floors, high ceilings, and nice windows and doors.  I mean, I have little set things that I do.  Yeah.

 

Yeah.

 

Well, Carol and I too.  Carol likes building too, so we have those projects we could do together, you know.

 

Right.  You go back and forth between San Francisco and Kauai.  And I know Kauai is your home.  But do you have a preference down deep?

 

I always preferred Kaua‘i.  And now that I’m on Kaua‘i fulltime, I like go back San Francisco and eat and stuff. So, you know, I like both sides. But we’ll spend a month out of the year maybe, if we’re lucky, in San Francisco.  But that’s it, that’s about it.  Yeah.  Our life is pretty much on Kauai now.  It’s getting harder, you know.  I had a two and a quarter acre farm, flower farm, fruit trees, and so I used to like working in the yard.  But now, I’m just pretty much in the studio.  I’m not so physical anymore.  So, it’s just different.  As you get older, I just kinda adapt, you know.

 

You really did kinda make your own way.  You were able to do what you wanted to do for so much of your life.

 

M-hm; kind of.  You kinda gotta find the spot; right?  I mean, I think starting with education.  You gotta be educated.  Stay in school and find something that you want.

 

Acclaimed artist David Kuraoka says he has plans to create a ceramics art center for the Kauai community, so that he can continue to teach and inspire others on his home island.  And he continues to challenge himself by finding new ways to express himself through his art.  Mahalo to David Kuraoka of Hā‘ena, Kauai. And thank you for joining us for this edition of Long Story Short on PBS Hawai‘i.  I’m Leslie Wilcox.  Aloha nui.

 

For audio and written transcripts of all episodes of Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox, visit PBSHawaii.org.  To download free podcasts of Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox, go to the Apple iTunes Store or visit PBSHawaii.org.

 

The challenges for me is never ending.  If I master a particular part of ceramics, then I look for another part of ceramics. In other words, I keep searching within the field.  There’s so much to do.  My work chases my work.  In other words, whatever I do, then I see and I learn from it, and then I move on.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Maui County Mayor, Kaua‘i County Mayor

 

This week’s INSIGHTS features two Neighbor Island mayoral races:

 

–At 8:00 pm, it’s the candidates in the race to become the first new Maui County Mayor in eight years. Maui County Council woman Elle Cochran and former councilman Mike Victorino emerged as the top two candidates from an eight-person primary.

 

–Then, at 8:30 pm, it’s the candidates in the race to become the first new Kaua‘i County Mayor in 10 years. Kaua‘i County Council members Derek Kawakami and Mel Rapozo were the top vote getters in the primary.

 

Join us during our live discussion by phoning in, or leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also live streamed on pbshawaii.org and Facebook Live.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

To see an archive of past INSIGHTS ELECTION 2018 shows, click here.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 907 – 2017/2018 Fall Semester Compilation

 

This special compilation show features some of the top stories from the Fall Semester of the 2017/2018 school year. In all of the selected stories, HIKI NŌ students explore the truth about the people they are featuring.

 

TOP STORY
Students from Moanalua High School in the Salt Lake district of O‘ahu profile Perry “Mooch” Fernandez, a surf instructor headquartered at the “Bowls” break near Ala Moana Beach Park. Halfway through the story, it is revealed that “Mooch”, having separated from his wife, lives out of his van. He not only survives, he thrives – through exchanges of kindnesses with the close-knit community of surfers who consider him a fixture, a mentor, and the center of their lives at “Bowls.”

 

ALSO FEATURED
–Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a Maui Waena Intermediate School student who does not let his disability, caused by a genetic spinal condition, hold him back from pursuing sports, music and all the joys of life.

 

–Students from Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i tell the story of a woman who discovered her truth through her life-long commitment to dance.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle tell the story of wheelchair-bound school counselor who, after his debilitating diving accident, found his truth by connecting to a Higher Power.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu tell the story of a high school student who finds his truth in his aspiration to carry on his parent’s pig farming business.

 

–Students from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i discover the truth of how a Vietnam War veteran copes with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

 

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i show how a video about a special-needs elementary school student produced by a classmate led to a greater understanding and acceptance by the student’s peers.

 

–Students from Kaua‘i High School in Lihu‘e express their concerns about their generation’s over-reliance on screens to see and experience the world around them.

 

This special compilation show is hosted by Brooke Kanna and Haven Luper-Jasso, two HIKI NŌ students from Kaua‘i High School who were among the students that participated in PBS Hawai‘i’s live town hall special KĀKOU: Have You Fact-checked Your Truth?

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 15, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 16, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode # 906 – 2017 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge

 

This episode features stories from the 2017 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge. In September of 2017, five high schools and nine middle schools participated in a challenge in which teams had exactly four days to conceptualize, shoot, write, and edit a HIKI NŌ story based on a specific theme. No work could be done on the stories prior to the production window because the theme was not revealed until the start of the four-day sprint. The theme of this challenge was “What it’s Like to Walk in Another Person’s Shoes.” No teachers, or adults of any kind, could provide hands-on assistance. It was all up to the students.

 

TOP STORIES
Included in this episode are the winners of the Middle School and High School Divisions of the 2017 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge. The Middle School winners were from ‘Ewa Makai Middle School in the ‘Ewa district of O‘ahu. Their story “Lolita” features a drag queen in his early 20s who explains how taking on his drag persona of Lolita gives him confidence and helps him cope with a sometimes difficult life. The winning High School story, “Hurricane Harvey Relief,” was created by students at Kalaheo High School in Windward O‘ahu. It follows a group of volunteers who put themselves in the shoes of Houston’s Hurricane Harvey victims and helped to collect goods toward the relief effort.

 

ALSO FEATURED
–Students from Maui High School created a story about what it’s like to walk in the shoes of a teen transitioning to a new gender.

 

–Students from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i featured the school band president who is successful at what he does because he tries to walk in the shoes of his fellow musicians.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu stress the importance of empathy in dealing with people who suffer from a very painful condition known as Fibromyalgia.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle show us that walking in the shoes of someone who moved to Hawaiʻi for a better life helps us to better appreciate our island home.

 

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i help us to consider what it’s like being a teenager who is prone to suicide.

 

–Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului tell the story of a cobbler who creates custom shoes for people who can’t wear conventional footwear.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 8, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 9, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

 

1 2 3 8