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Connecting through Storytelling

 

CEO Message

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO

Over the course of 13 years as CEO of PBS Hawaiʻi, I’ve had ample opportunity to experience something very delightful about our viewers:

 

Many of them are every bit as compelling in communicating as our professional storytellers.

 

Good storytellers know their audience. They know how to connect with emotion and imagination. I think that’s why many of our programs evoke strong responses; and it’s why our viewers’ letters “get” to us.

 

In correspondence, some of our viewers relate family stories passed down through the generations, describing intimate conversations at pivotal times of history, such as the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy, the Pearl Harbor attack and closely fought elections.

 

CEO Message: Connecting through Storytelling

 

It’s a wonderful exchange – viewers writing to amplify something they saw in one of our programs, or to add context, or to riff on a related thought. Often they’re telling of their own experience, after a story that aired on PBS Hawaiʻi has struck a chord in their life.

 

Responding to PBS NewsHour coverage of the crackdown on immigrants seeking shelter and work in the U.S., a Honolulu viewer wrote that more immigrants should be welcomed: “My grandfather, who came from Japan, worked from morning to night for three dollars a day. I am third generation and educated … I will not work at a job where I get dirty. I will not work at a job where I get smelly. I will not work at a job that requires me to carry more than five pounds. I am a typical third-generation immigrant.”

 

Another viewer reached out after seeing the American Experience episode about the Pacific search for Amelia Earhart. Just as if she were having an in-person conversation, she noted that the investigation didn’t seem to include the hypothesis that the ocean had swallowed all trace of evidence.

 

“I think that is really what happened,” she wrote. “But empirical research is never really satisfied with a ‘nothing’ outcome. There has to be something ‘real.’ And more importantly, there has to be ‘closure,’ which may not be true.”

 

As author Annette Simmons said, “Story gives people enough space to think for themselves. The story develops and grows in the mind of the listener …”

 

We’re all the richer for connecting through storytelling.

 

Mahalo nui,

Leslie signature

 

 

National Memorial Day Concert 2019

National Memorial Day Concert 2019

 

Join hosts Joe Mantegna and Mary McCormack for the 30th anniversary live broadcast of America’s national night of remembrance from the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol, featuring the National Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Jack Everly.

 

Preview

 

This program will encore at 8:30 pm.

 

 

 

THE 2018 NATIONAL MEMORIAL DAY CONCERT

 

On the eve of Memorial Day, a star-studded lineup will grace the stage for one of PBS’ highest-rated programs. This multi-award-winning television event has become an American tradition, honoring the military service and sacrifice of all our men and women in uniform, their families at home and those who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our country.

 

This program will encore Sun., May 27, 8:30 pm.

 

 

The National Memorial Day Concert

 

Hawai‘i’s own Auli‘i Cravalho, star of Disney’s Moana, is scheduled to open this year’s National Memorial Day Concert on PBS with a performance of “The Star-Spangled Banner.” The concert will be broadcast from the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol.

 

Actors Laurence Fishburne and Joe Mantegna will co-host. Actor Gary Sinise will present a 75th anniversary salute to the Doolittle Raiders, the aviators who changed the course of World War II in the Pacific.

 

 

The all-star line-up for the event includes: General Colin L. Powell USA (Ret.); Renée Fleming; Vanessa Williams; Scotty McCreery; John Ondrasik of Five for Fighting; John Ortiz; Christopher Jackson; Ana Ortiz; Ronan Tynan; and Russell Watson, in performance with the National Symphony Orchestra under the direction of conductor Jack Everly.

 

This program will encore later in the evening at Sun., May 28, 9:00 pm

 

America in Black & Blue
A PBS NewsHour Weekend Special

America in Black & Blue, A PBS NewsHour Weekend Special

 

After a week of violence, grief and horror, with five police officers shot dead in Dallas, and two African American men shot dead by police officers in Minnesota and Louisiana, this news special will dig deep to explore the roots of these events, competing accounts of responsibility and justice, and televise the conversation that America is having around so many losses, mutual fears, and also around the common ground where progress may be made. Journalist Alison Stewart anchors, with reports from Newark, New Jersey and Minneapolis, Minnesota.