Louisa May Alcott

LITTLE WOMEN ON MASTERPIECE
Part 3 of 3

LITTLE WOMEN ON MASTERPIECE: Parts 3

 

Part 3

 

A year has passed and there are new additions to the March family – but there is worry all around as Beth’s health and spirits flag.

 

Preview

 

Amy is chosen over Jo to accompany Aunt Carroll’s daughter on a tour of Europe. A distraught Jo flees to New York to pursue her career, where she meets the kind Professor Bhaer. But devastating news from home cuts her adventure short.

As their paths cross in Europe, Amy and Laurie’s friendship develops into something more. The family reunites upon Amy’s return, which is made more joyful by unexpected news and a surprise visitor.

 

 

 

LITTLE WOMEN ON MASTERPIECE
Part 2 of 3

LITTLE WOMEN ON MASTERPIECE: Parts 2

 

Part 2

 

As Marmee waits by her husband’s sickbed, the March sisters must fend for themselves at home. Together they face unrequited love, hurtful rumors and trouble at school. But when Beth falls dangerously ill, Laurie sends for Marmee to return home.

 

Preview

 

Relief sweeps over the family when Beth recovers and Mr. March returns home for Christmas. Jo hears promising news about her writing, while Meg and John Brooke’s relationship develops.

 

The family holds a joyous wedding ceremony, but Jo grows anxious: the future for her and her loved ones seems fraught with challenges.

 

 

 

LITTLE WOMEN ON MASTERPIECE
Part 1 of 3

LITTLE WOMEN ON MASTERPIECE: Part 1

 

Part 1

 

Based on the classic novel by Louisa May Alcott, this coming-of-age story, set against the backdrop of the Civil War, follows sisters Jo, Meg, Beth and Amy March on their journey from childhood to adulthood. With the help of their mother, Marmee, the girls navigate sibling rivalry, first love, loss and marriage.

 

Preview

 

 

 

ORCHARD HOUSE:
Home of Little Women

 

ORCHARD HOUSE: HOME OF LITTLE WOMEN is a captivating documentary that transports viewers to a 350-year-old home in Concord, Massachusetts with literary and historical significance unlike any other. It is here that the classic novel, Little Women, was written and set. With a nurturing, talented family as owners and literary giants Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Nathaniel Hawthorne as neighbors, Orchard House uniquely inspired Louisa May Alcott to write Little Women at a desk in her room that her father made especially for her. The documentary uncovers a fascinating piece of living history — a pilgrimage site for scholars and fans alike. This enduring and lively house speaks to the power of place in a way few American homes ever have. It also reveals the powerful historical, literary, and very human elements of the home and the people who lived there. ORCHARD HOUSE chronicles its history through archival photographs, letters and journal entries from one of the most well-documented families in American literary history, along with interviews of scholars and fans — including world class artists, Pulitzer Prize-winning authors, and first-time visitors — in this entertaining and informative family-friendly film.

 

 

AMERICAN MASTERS
Louisa May Alcott

 

Alcott’s reputation as a morally upstanding New England spinster, reflecting the conventional propriety of mid-19th century Concord, Massachusetts, is firmly established.  Raised among reformers, iconoclasts and Transcendentalists, the intellectual protégé of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau, Alcott was actually a free thinker, with democratic ideals and progressive values about women – a worldly careerist of sorts.  Most surprising is that Alcott led, anonymously and under the pseudonym A.M. Barnard, a literary double life not discovered until the 1940s.  As Barnard, Alcott penned some thirty pulp fiction thrillers, with characters running the gamut from murderers and revolutionaries to cross-dressers and opium addicts – a far cry from her better-known works featuring fatherly mentors, courageous mothers and impish children.