map

THE CROWD & THE CLOUD
Viral vs. Virus

 

Sensors on asthma inhalers generate real-time maps of environmental dangers to help patients, physicians and disease detectives in Louisville, Kentucky. Street knowledge was also crucial in a historic medical breakthrough: John Snow’s mapping of cholera fatalities in 19th century London. In West Oakland, California, citizens confront air pollution and rising asthma rates by collecting traffic data. Local ordinances are changed and everyone breathes easier.

 

Can apps and maps combat globalized diseases in a warming world? Stories of citizen science fighting mosquito-borne diseases with apps and crowd-sourced data in Barcelona, Houston and New Orleans. In Kenya, Medic Mobile develops smart but low-cost software to give simple phones powerful capabilities to help community health workers improve maternal and child health.

 

Hosted by former NASA Chief Scientist Waleed Abdalati, “The Crowd & The Cloud” takes viewers on a global tour of the projects and people on the front lines of citizen science and crowdsourcing.

 

 

Nainoa Thompson:
Navigating Currents on Land As Well as at Sea

Hokuleʻa

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiThere are at least a couple of surprises about Nainoa Thompson’s appearance on Long Story Short, coming up on Tuesday, Nov. 17, at 7:30 pm.

Nainoa chose the place for the interview, and it’s not within sight of the ocean. It’s his family property, upland in Niu Valley, with green fields, spreading kiawe trees and his mom Laura’s friendly chickens.

 

And the master navigator and President of the Polynesian Voyaging Society isn’t speaking about the ocean, except as a connector to cultures and communities. No, this conversation is about a different kind of wayfinding: on land, in political and diplomatic currents, at far-flung ports of call.

 

Nainoa ThompsonFor his work in bringing together nations on the Hokulea’s ongoing Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage, the East-West Center has named Thompson its 2015 Asia-Pacific Community Builder.

Just as he has spent decades observing the skies and seas, Nainoa has been involved for many
years with the East-West Center, sharing with and getting to know students from 30 countries. When it came time to prepare for the five-year global voyage, he tapped the Center’s deep knowledge.

 

“It was through them that we had the ability to build the kind of relationships we needed, whether governmental or community, or cultural, educational and environmental, or even port logistics,” he said.

 

Whatever the protocol, he says, the key is knowing how to show respect for others and their home.

 

He said the exchanges on land “allow us the opportunity to believe that we’re more alike than we’re different, that diversity is a strength, and that diversity is a treasure if it is built on … respect.”

 

And, with a nod to the greenery of the surrounding valley, Nainoa comments that Hawaii is not just a nice place. He believes other nations can see that Hokuleʻa crewmembers are from a seat of power. Because, he says, our “amazingly beautiful” cultural mix has created a fabric that is based not on race, but on values.

 

I hope you’re able to see this episode! Long Story Short also is available online at www.PBSHawaii.org

 

A hui hou (until next time),

Leslie signature

 

 

The 2015 National Geographic Bee

 

Each year thousands of schools in the United States participate in the National Geographic Bee using materials prepared by the National Geographic Society. The contest is designed to inspire students to be curious about the world. Schools with students in grades four through eight are eligible for this entertaining and challenging competition.

 

Hawaii’s State Geographic Bee winner vies for the Bee crown and the top prize of a $50,000 college scholarship and lifetime membership in the National Geographic Society.

 

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