Massachusetts

HIKI NŌ
HIKI NŌ Class of 2018 Special, Part 4 of 4

 

HIKI NŌ presents the last of its four-part Class of 2018 Specials, in which outstanding HIKI NŌ graduates discuss their HIKI NŌ experiences and how they feel the skills they learned from HIKI NŌ will help them in college, the workplace and life.

 

Part 4 features Melanie Lau, who graduated from McKinley High School on O‘ahu and is now majoring in creative writing at Emerson College in Boston, Massachusetts; Hannah Dumon, who graduated from Konawaena High School on Hawai‘i Island and is now majoring in digital media arts at Hawai‘i Community College – Palamanui on Hawai‘i Island; and Leanna Thesken, who graduated from Kaua‘i High School in Līhu‘e and is now majoring in media communications at Point Loma Nazarene University in San Diego, California.

 

To start off the show, each graduate shows a HIKI NŌ story that they worked on and discusses what they learned from the experience of working on that particular story. Melanie presents her story “Ignition Program,” about a program at McKinley that pairs freshmen mentees with junior or senior mentors. Hannah shows “Gravitational Waves,” about a Konawaena High School alum who was part of the team that recently proved Einstein’s theory of relativity. Leanna presents her story “Food Truck Owner,” about a food truck entrepreneur who combines his love of science and cooking to create a unique culinary experience.

 

 

ORCHARD HOUSE:
Home of Little Women

 

ORCHARD HOUSE: HOME OF LITTLE WOMEN is a captivating documentary that transports viewers to a 350-year-old home in Concord, Massachusetts with literary and historical significance unlike any other. It is here that the classic novel, Little Women, was written and set. With a nurturing, talented family as owners and literary giants Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Nathaniel Hawthorne as neighbors, Orchard House uniquely inspired Louisa May Alcott to write Little Women at a desk in her room that her father made especially for her. The documentary uncovers a fascinating piece of living history — a pilgrimage site for scholars and fans alike. This enduring and lively house speaks to the power of place in a way few American homes ever have. It also reveals the powerful historical, literary, and very human elements of the home and the people who lived there. ORCHARD HOUSE chronicles its history through archival photographs, letters and journal entries from one of the most well-documented families in American literary history, along with interviews of scholars and fans — including world class artists, Pulitzer Prize-winning authors, and first-time visitors — in this entertaining and informative family-friendly film.

 

 

AMERICAN MASTERS
Louisa May Alcott

 

Alcott’s reputation as a morally upstanding New England spinster, reflecting the conventional propriety of mid-19th century Concord, Massachusetts, is firmly established.  Raised among reformers, iconoclasts and Transcendentalists, the intellectual protégé of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau, Alcott was actually a free thinker, with democratic ideals and progressive values about women – a worldly careerist of sorts.  Most surprising is that Alcott led, anonymously and under the pseudonym A.M. Barnard, a literary double life not discovered until the 1940s.  As Barnard, Alcott penned some thirty pulp fiction thrillers, with characters running the gamut from murderers and revolutionaries to cross-dressers and opium addicts – a far cry from her better-known works featuring fatherly mentors, courageous mothers and impish children.

 

 

What Drives KEN BURNS?

 

CEO Message

What Drives Ken Burns?

 

Ken Burns, Photo courtesy of Justin Altman

 

Filmmaker Ken Burns, who’s coming out with an 18-hour Vietnam War film to be shown over 10 evenings this month on PBS Hawai‘i, freely admits that he’s a workaholic; that he’s obsessive in his pursuit of archival material for his films; that his detractors dismiss him as long-winded.

 

And Burns can laugh at himself.

 

As he did when he was being honored as the greatest American documentary filmmaker of his generation. Stepping up to receive a lifetime achievement, he joked that he’d prepared a nine-part response.

 

He had to learn about laughter, since sadness and loss were prevailing childhood themes.

 

Burns, 64, is clear about what drives him and his compulsion to look at the past. It is the death of his mother, Lyla Burns, just before he turned 12. She had suffered from breast cancer for nearly a decade.

 

Burns remembers coming home from school or play every day and telling his ailing mother stories about what had happened, in effect sharing life with her. After she passed away, he recalls watching movies with father, Robert Burns, and seeing him cry, which was something his father didn’t do in other circumstances. That’s when young Burns says he grasped the storytelling power of film.

 

In a short video posted online at creativeplanetnetwork.com, Burns says: “I found myself becoming a documentary filmmaker, trying to tell stories and using American history to tell those stories that I wanted to tell. When you look back at it, the job that I try to do is to wake the dead. And it doesn’t seem too far a leap to understand, from that early decision to be a filmmaker, who I really want to wake up.”

 

From the earliest time that he can remember as a child, he says he knew his beloved mom was sick. He was not close to his father.

 

As a young man, he rejected chasing a Hollywood-type career. He says he innately knew, and was taught at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts, that “there’s much more drama in what is and what was, than in anything the human imagination can dream of.”

 

Delivering the commencement address at Stanford University last year, Burns explained that delving into history can lead to personal and professional breakthroughs.

 

“The past often offers an illuminating and clear-headed perspective from which to observe and reconcile the passions of the present moment, just when they threaten to overwhelm us,” he told new graduates.

 

Burns wants this newest film with his creative partner Lynn Novick, about the divisive Vietnam War era, to spur national healing.

 

As he told an interviewer from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee:

 

“We caught something during the Vietnam War – like a virus – and we are still suffering from the effects of that virus today. I’m hoping my film is a bit like a vaccination – that it exposes you to a little bit of the disease to permit you to go past it and heal from it.”

 

I invite you to join me in viewing this new Burns/Novick film series, starting at 8:00 pm, Sunday, September 17, on your TV station, PBS Hawai‘i.

 

A hui hou (until next time),
Leslie Wilcoxʻ signature

 

 

GREAT PERFORMANCES
Dancing at Jacob’s Pillow: Never Stand Still

 

Enter a world of non-stop dance, the daring artists who dedicate their lives to it and an extraordinary place where it flourishes. Filmed at Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival in Becket, Massachusetts, this program features thrilling performances and revelatory conversations with renowned choreographers and dancers, including Judith Jamison, Paul Taylor, Mark Morris, Suzanne Farrell and Frederic Franklin, and one of the last interviews with the iconic Merce Cunningham. Narrated by acclaimed choreographer Bill T. Jones, the film interweaves the story of Jacob’s Pillow as a generator for creativity with the history of dance in America.

 

NOVA
Operation Lighthouse Rescue

 

The Gay Head Lighthouse, a historic landmark perched high on the cliffs of Martha’s Vineyard in Massachusetts, is soon to become the next victim of the ocean’s relentless erosion of the island’s cliffs. Join engineers as they race to rescue this national treasure.

 

GREAT PERFORMANCES
Dancing at Jacob’s Pillow: Never Stand Still

 

Enter a world of non-stop dance, the daring artists who dedicate their lives to it and an extraordinary place where it flourishes. Filmed at Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival in Becket, Massachusetts, this program features thrilling performances and revelatory conversations with renowned choreographers and dancers, including Judith Jamison, Paul Taylor, Mark Morris, Suzanne Farrell and Frederic Franklin, and one of the last interviews with the iconic Merce Cunningham. Narrated by acclaimed choreographer Bill T. Jones, the film interweaves the story of Jacob’s Pillow as a generator for creativity with the history of dance in America. The program features never-before-seen footage and images from the Pillow’s rare and extensive archives, including the pioneering Ted Shawn, who purchased Jacob’s Pillow in 1931.