Mauna Kea

HIKI NŌ
Outstanding Stories from Winter Quarter

 

This look back at some of the outstanding HIKI NŌ stories from the winter quarter of the 2014/2015 school year is hosted by two former HIKI NŌ interns, Akane Kashiwazaki and Terrence Nahina, now students at the University of Hawaii Academy for Creative Media.

 

Featured in this compilation show are:
A story from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui about McKayla Wandell, who grew up with a meth-addicted father and now uses what she has learned from that experience to help other teens cope with similar hardships through her talks at Maui TEDx conferences; a story from Wheeler Middle School on Oahu about eighth-grader Macy Walters’ quest to climb to the top of Mount Kilimanjaro, despite (and because of) the fact that she suffers from a rare autoimmune disease; a report from Moanalua High School on Oahu about why Hawaii’s high school students consume so much caffeine; a personal profile from King Intermediate School on Oahu about Aisha Yamamoto, a King Intermediate seventh-grader who loves using her skills as a DJ to get kids moving on the dance floor; a point-of-view report from Hoku Subiono of Kua o ka La PCS Milolii Hipuu Virtual Academy on Hawaii Island in which turns the lens on the controversial Thirty Meter Telescope project on Mauna Kea and his own struggles to reconcile his love of science with his Hawaiian heritage; a profile from Waianae Intermediate School on Oahu about Shardenei Luning, a young woman who finds similarities between her lives as a beauty pageant contestant and Pop Warner football player; and from Campbell High School on Oahu, the story of dancer Christian Jacob Nguyen, who uses his art-form to cope with the trauma of his parents’ divorce.

 

This program encores Saturday, Aug. 8 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, Aug. 9 at 3:00 pm.
You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Island School, Lihue

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Island School from Lihue, Kauai.

 

Top Story:
Kealakehe High School on Hawaii Island presents a story about students from their school and from Iolani School on Oahu who were selected to participate in a once-in-a-lifetime science project that will send NASA’s dust shield technology to the moon. These robotics students, called MoonRIDERS (Research Investigating Dust Expulsion & Removal Systems), will work with the Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems in hands-on experiments testing the capabilities of NASA’s EDS (Electrodynamic Dust Shield). Students will build a mock up lunar lander spacecraft, fabricate the actual flight frame for the mission, mount the EDS on it, install a camera and design a lunar re-duster, then test the entire system on the lower slopes of Mauna Kea to see how well it will remove dust off of the camera lens.

 

Also Featured:
Students at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauai visit Hanapepe Nights, a popular art, music and food festival in Kauai’s biggest little town. Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle tell the story of a husband and wife who left their careers as mechanical engineers to farm the very colorful, exotic dragon fruit on Maui. Students from McKinley High School on Oahu profile their school’s cross-country team captain, Hidemasa Vincent Mitsui, who was deemed ineligible to compete during his senior year because he had to repeat the 9th grade when he moved from Japan to Hawaii (OIA rules state that a 5th year student is ineligible to participate in high school sports). Even though he was not able to compete, Vincent inspired his teammates to do their very best and was eventually reinstated when his coach and athletic director appealed to the OIA.

 

Students at Iolani School on Oahu take us behind the scenes with the Iolani Hackers, a group of students and faculty members who create elaborate visual pranks meant to surprise and delight people on campus. Students at Saint Francis School on Oahu introduce us to Isabel Villanueva, the state air riflery champion who excels at the sport despite the fact that she lives with a rare medical condition – linear scleroderma – which causes her physical pain while participating in the sport. Students at Wheeler Middle School on Oahu show us how to stay safe on the internet by using proper social media etiquette and guidelines.

 

This program encores Saturday, May 2 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, May 3 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Should the Thirty Meter Telescope Be Built?

 

Construction of a Thirty Meter Telescope on Mauna Kea has been brought to a temporary halt as protests over building the 18-story high telescope stretch across the globe. Plans to build the $1.4 billion telescope have been seven years in the making, but opposition only gained momentum recently amid growing concern over further astronomy-related development on land Native Hawaiians consider sacred. Malia Mattoch moderates the discussion.

 

Tonight’s panelists include (In alphabetical order):

Paul Coleman, Astrophysicist, Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawai‘i-Manoa

Richard Ha, Hawai‘i Island Farmer and Businessman

Jon Osorio, Board President, KAHEA, a Hawaiian-Environmental Alliance

Kealoha Pisciotta, President, Mauna Kea Anaina Hou

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAII is a live public affairs show that is also live streamed on PBSHawaii.org. Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email, Twitter or live blogging. You may also email your questions ahead of time to insights@pbshawaii.org.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands during the live broadcast.