melody

NA MELE
Melveen Leed

NA MELE: Melveen Leed

 

Singer Melveen Leed is joined by her hula dancer daughter Kaaikaula Naluai at the PBS Hawai‘i studios. Best known for contemporary Hawaiian, jazz and country, Moloka‘i girl Melveen also has deep roots in traditional Hawaiian song.

 

MAGIC MOMENTS
The Best of 50’s Pop

The Best of 50s Pop

 

Phyllis McGuire, Pat Boone and Nick Clooney host this nostalgic trip back to the 1950s. The program’s mix of live performance and archival footage takes viewers back to the era’s pop music days with classic moments from Patti Page, Perry Como, Debbie Reynolds, the McGuire Sisters and more.

 

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT
Pure Caz: The Music of The Brothers Cazimero

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT: Pure Caz. Robert and Roland Cazimero

 

Legendary musicians Robert and Roland Cazimero of the The Brothers Cazimero perform an enchanting array of original compositions and island standards. Also featured are reflections from the brothers and their friends on their childhood, their illustrious careers, and their perspectives on Hawaiian music from the past to the present.

 

 

FILIPINO AMERICAN LIVES
Harana: The Search for the Lost Art of Serenade

 

Florante, a classically trained guitarist returns to the Philippines after 12 years of absence, to rediscover the music of harana, a long forgotten tradition where men sing under the window at night to declare their love for a woman, and discovers three of the last surviving practitioners.

 

FILIPINO AMERICAN LIVES
Delano Manongs: Forgotten Heroes of the United Farm Workers/Jeepney

 

Learn the story of farm labor organizer Larry Itliong and a group of Filipino farm workers who instigated The Delano Grape Strike of 1965, which brought about the creation of the United Farm Workers Union (UFW). While the movement is known for Cesar Chavez’s leadership and considered a Chicano movement, Filipinos played a pivotal role.

 

Then, Jeepney follows artists, drivers and passengers of the famed ornate transportation vehicles in the Philippines.

 

Roland Cazimero, Almost 3 Years After Onstage Illness

Robert Cazimero, musician and entertainer.

 

Roland Cazimero, who was hospitalized after falling ill in 2014 during The Brothers Cazimero’s Maui May Day concert, and who has since performed only rarely, speaks with me about his health challenges, personal life and career in a Long Story Short episode debuting Tuesday, April 25 at 7:30 pm on PBS Hawai‘i.

 

Roland, whose nickname is Bozo or Boz, still hadn’t discussed the state of his health with his older brother and longtime music partner, Robert Cazimero: “We just don’t.” But he believes Robert knows that the sun has set on their iconic performances.

 

A virtuoso of the 12-string guitar, Roland would let Robert, on bass, handle the artful and upbeat onstage oratory and the smooth segues between songs. Roland injected teasing; he also was a master of short, flippant remarks. Together, the Brothers drew crowds and created enduring fans with their beautiful, soaring music and their entertaining banter.

 

In our conversation, Roland speaks comfortably and at length about picking up music easily as a kid in a musical family, but never getting formal piano lessons like his brother Robert and his twin sister Tootsie, because he was “kolohe” (a rascal). Also as a keiki, he met the legendary singer/guitarist Gabby Pahinui, and was entrusted with buffing up Pahinui’s guitar. He laughs that Gabby never got his name right; Roland was always Ronald.

 

As an adult, he was a “rebel” and a “player,” or womanizer. He said Robert and their hula dancer, the late Leina‘ala Heine, would take care of devoted fans and “high makamakas,” and Roland would “hang with the hoodlums.” They were his friends, and he says almost all of them have died, some in prison.

 

Appearing at PBS Hawai‘i with his loyal wife and caregiver Lauwa‘e, Roland explains matter-of-factly that his partying lifestyle was bad for his health, which is still touch-and-go. The couple reveals that he’s been diagnosed with congestive heart failure, diabetes and carpal tunnel syndrome.

 

Now more of a homebody, Roland still writes songs and plays guitar, adjusting for his carpal tunnel condition. Lauwa‘e, who holds down an admin job when she’s not taking care of him, is his “best friend in the world,” he says – next to God, who’s “the best, period.”

 

One doctor told him plainly that he should make peace with his maker. “Done,” says Roland. While he’s still not always compliant with what the doctor says, he’s become a follower of Christ. When people ask about his health, Lauwa‘e likes to keep the answer short and sweet: “He’s alive.”

 

For any of us, that’s a gift.

 

Aloha a hui hou,
Leslie signature

 

A Christmas Carol:
The Concert

 

This unique musical event marks the first time Charles Dickens’ classic A Christmas Carol has been adapted for a live orchestral concert with choir and soloists and performed for audiences in a concert setting. Robert Christianson’s score is filled with memorable songs, and the story, faithfully adapted by Broadway’s Alisa Hauser, is performed by such Chicago and New York theater luminaries as Michael Aaron Lindner and E. Faye Butler.

 

GREAT PERFORMANCES AT THE MET
Il Barbiere di Siviglia

 

The Met’s effervescent production of Rossini’s classic comedy stars Isabel Leonard as the feisty Rosina, Lawrence Brownlee as her conspiring flame and Christopher Maltman as the endlessly resourceful and charming barber of Seville. Michele Mariotti conducts the vivid score, which features some of the most instantly recognizable melodies in opera.