Micronesia

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
The Navigators: Pathfinders of the Pacific

 

Directed by Sam Low and Boyd Estus, this documentary explores the heritage of Polynesian wayfinding, and how indigenous Pacific societies sustained their navigational practices and practitioners. The film features Mau Piailug, who was at that point the last known navigator to be ceremonially initiated on Satawal, an atoll in Micronesia’s remote Caroline Islands.

 

 



PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Papa Mau: The Wayfinder

 

Shortly after Hōkūle‘a was built in the 1970s, a search began for someone who could teach the art of navigation without modern instruments – native knowledge that had been all but lost. Master navigator Mau Piailug of Micronesia agreed to share what he knew. He played a critical role in Hōkūle‘a’s maiden voyage to Tahiti, and the rebirth of Polynesian unity and pride that followed. This film was co-produced by ‘Ōiwi TV and ‘Ōiwi TV

 

You can also view Papa Mau: The Wayfinder on ‘Ōiwi TV’s website.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Giving a Damn

 

Many Hawai‘i residents are familiar with the story behind the Micronesian migration. Seventy years ago, two nuclear bombs were dropped on Bikini Atoll, setting off 12 years of detonation in the Marshall Islands. Later, former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger was reported to have referred to the displacement of Micronesians this way: “There are only 90,000 of them out there. Who gives a damn?”

 

Today it’s estimated Micronesians represent about 2% of Hawai‘i’s population. Despite what most people think to be the truth, they are not living off the public dole. They pay taxes and struggle with health, employment, housing – and most of all, assimilation. Many are homeless and would like to return to their island home. But now there’s a new environmental tragedy that threatens the Marshall Islands. Has the migration of Micronesians only just begun? And this time, who will give a damn?

 

For additional reference on this discussion:

 

We Are Oceaniahttp://www.weareoceania.org

 

Compact of Free Association Community Advocacy Networkhttps://www.facebook.com/cofacan

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

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Email:insights@pbshawaii.org

 

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