mining

NOVA
Secret Tunnel Warfare

 

During World War I, the Allies and Germans repeatedly struggled to break the hideous stalemate of trench warfare. In the winter of 1916, Allied engineers devised a massive surprise attack: over 1 million pounds of explosives hidden in secret tunnels driven under German lines. Building the tunnels was desperate work, with tunnelers at constant risk from flooding, cave-ins, and enemy digging teams. In June of 1917, the planted mines at Messines were simultaneously triggered, killing an estimated 10,000 German troops instantly. Now, archaeologists are revealing the extraordinary scale and risks of the Allied tunneling operations in one of the biggest excavations ever undertaken on the Western Front. “Secret Tunnel Warfare” opens a unique window on the frenzy of Allied mining activity that led up to the attack and its bitter aftermath.

 

STANDING ON SACRED GROUND
Islands of Sanctuary

 

In this four-part documentary series, native people share ecological wisdom and spiritual reverence while battling a utilitarian view of land in the form of consumer culture and resource extraction as well as competing religions and climate change.

 

Islands of Sanctuary
In Australia’s Northern Territory, Aboriginal clans maintain Indigenous Protected Areas and resist the destructive effects of a mining boom. In Hawaii, ecological and spiritual practices are used to restore the sacred island of Kahoolawe after 50 years of military use as a bombing range.

 

STANDING ON SACRED GROUND
Profit & Loss

 

In this four-part documentary series, native people share ecological wisdom and spiritual reverence while battling a utilitarian view of land in the form of consumer culture and resource extraction as well as competing religions and climate change.

 

Profit & Loss
In Papua New Guinea, a Chinese government-owned nickel mine has relocated villagers to a taboo sacred mountain, built a new pipeline and refinery on contested clan land, and dumped mining waste into the sea. In Alberta, First Nations people suffer from rare cancers as their traditional hunting grounds are strip-mined to unearth the world’s third-largest oil reserve. Indigenous people tell their own stories – and confront us with the ethical consequences of our culture of consumption.