movement

HIKI NŌ 2|20|20:
John Rao and Other Stories | Program

 

TOP STORY

 

“John Rao”
Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on the island of Kauaʻi tell the story of a man who slowly turned his life around as the result of a spiritual awakening.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

“Young Cartographer”
Students from Hongwanji Mission School in Nuʻuanu Valley on Oʻahu tell the story of a young cartographer who creates imaginative worlds through hand-drawn maps.

 

“How to Make Jewelry from Magazines”
Students from Roosevelt High School on Oʻahu show us a crafty way of making bracelets from old magazines.

 

“Vibrant Hawaiʻi”
Students from Waiākea Elementary School on the Big Island tell the story of a financially struggling, single mother and a visionary community movement that hopes to solve the island’s poverty epidemic.

 

“Hygiene Products for the Homeless”
Students from Aliamanu Middle School on the island of Oʻahu tell the story of middle school students who organized a hygiene drive to help address a prevalent health issue affecting the homeless.

 

“Chef to the Homeless”
Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani tell the story of a chef whose compassion for the disadvantaged led him to work at a homeless shelter.

 

Students from Ewa Makai Middle School host this episode of HIKI NŌ from their campus in Ewa Beach, Oʻahu.

 

 

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Kū Kanaka/Stand Tall

 

In August 1969, 15-year-old Terry Kanalu Young became quadriplegic after a diving accident. Initially bitter about his circumstances, he eventually realized that his rage could destroy him – or he could learn a great lesson from it. This film explores Young’s life journey, from a Hawaiian history student to an activist and community leader, and how he used his insights about identity and trauma to offer hope to dispossessed Native Hawaiians.

 

To learn more about Terry Kanalu Young, be sure to see this interview.

 

 

COUNTRY MUSIC
Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way? (1973 – 1983)

COUNTRY MUSIC: A Film by Ken Burns - Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way? (1973 – 1983)

 

Witness a vibrant era in country music, with Dolly Parton finding mainstream success; Hank Williams, Jr. and Rosanne Cash emerging from their famous fathers’ shadows; and Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings launching the “Outlaw” movement.

 

 

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Ruby Ridge

 

Through eyewitness accounts from Randy Weaver’s daughter and federal agents and others involved in the deadly confrontation, examine the 1992 FBI siege at Ruby Ridge near Naples, Idaho that helped launch the modern militia movement.

 

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
The First Rainbow Coalition

 

In 1969, the Chicago Black Panther Party began to form alliances across lines of race and ethnicity with other community-based movements in the city, including the Latino group the Young Lords Organization and the southern whites of the Young Patriots organization. Banding together in one of the most segregated cities in postwar America to collectively confront issues such as police brutality and substandard housing, they called themselves the Rainbow Coalition. By 1973, the coalition had collapsed under the weight of relentless harassment by local and federal law enforcement. Although short-lived, it had an outsize impact: Breaking down barriers between communities, it created a permanent shift in Chicago politics and an organizing model for future activists and politicians across the nation. The First Rainbow Coalition tells the movement’s little-known story through rare archival footage and interviews with former coalition members.

 

 

 

Peter, Paul and Mary at Newport 1963-65

PETER, PAUL AND MARY AT NEWPORT 1963-65

 

This special captures the spirit of the times when folk music dominated the Top 40 charts, providing the soundtrack for enormous, unprecedented changes in the American social-political landscape. Songs include “The Times They Are A-Changin’,” “If I Had a Hammer,” “Blowin’ in the Wind” and “Wasn’t That a Time.”

 

Preview

 

 

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Living Your Dying

PBS HAWAII PRESENTS: Living Your Dying - Rev. Mitsuo “Mits” Aoki, a pioneer of Hawaii’s hospice movement.

 

Rev. Mitsuo “Mits” Aoki, a pioneer of Hawai‘i’s hospice movement and founder of the University of Hawaii School of Religion, passed away in August 2010. This film from 2003 highlights his own transformative near-death experience; his therapeutic work with terminally-ill cancer patients; the death of his wife Evelyn; and thoughts about his own mortality. For over 40 years, Rev. Aoki attempted to take the terror out of dying, and showed others how to experience death as not just the end of life, but as a vital part of life, as well.

 

For inquiries about “Living Your Dying” email the Mits Aoki Legacy Foundation at:
MitsAokiLegacy@hawaii.rr.com

 

 

 

LIFE FROM ABOVE
Moving Planet

 

See new footage of the greatest, most beautiful and powerful movements on our planet. Cameras in space capture events like an elephant family’s struggle through drought, and thousands of Shaolin Kung-Fu students performing in perfect synchronicity.

 

 

 

NATURE
The Serengeti Rules

 

Explore some of the most remote and spectacular places on Earth with a pioneering group of scientists who make surprising discoveries that transform human understanding of nature and ecology. Based on a book of the same name.

 

 

 

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