myth

GREAT PERFORMANCES
Vienna Philharmonic Summer Night Concert 2019

 

Enjoy the world-renowned Vienna Philharmonic’s annual concert from Schonbrunn Palace with guest conductor Gustavo Dudamel and famed pianist Yuja Wang performing pieces including Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue” and Sousa’s “Stars and Stripes Forever.”

 

 

 

GREAT PERFORMANCES
Vienna Philharmonic Summer Night Concert 2018

 

Enjoy the world-renowned Vienna Philharmonic’s annual open-air concert from Austria’s Imperial Schönbrunn Palace, featuring conductor Valery Gergiev and internationally acclaimed soprano Anna Netrebko as a guest soloist.

 

 

A Front Row Seat to Myth-Busting

 

CEO Message

A Front Row Seat to Myth-Busting

 CEO Message: A Front Row Seat to Myth-Busting. Ornithologist Auguste von Bayern with a jackdaw
Ornithologist Auguste von Bayern, with a jackdaw, from the NOVA episode Bird Brain

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO“What a bird brain!” “You’re a Neanderthal!” Not so long ago, these were taunts. But, thanks to recent research by scientists and the fine documentaries on PBS, we know better.

 

And I’m just the person to be thrilled by these discoveries. When I was a kid, my no-nonsense grandmother called me a bird brain every time I forgot my rubber slippers on our neighbors’ porch, which was often. And just last month, a 23andme.com ancestry test turned up Neanderthal DNA in my family.

 

When you sit back and view Nature or NOVA on Wednesday nights on PBS Hawai‘i, you sometimes have a front row seat to myth-busting. In vibrant video, you see that some of the ideas and conclusions printed in our old textbooks have been blown away.

 

As depicted in the recent NOVA episode Bird Brain, birds are far from empty-headed. They make great use of their small neuron-packed brains. They turn pebbles and sticks into tools; they plan multiple steps to solve problems; and some even “read” human faces. Put birds to the test with puzzles – and they can figure out when to defer a reward in order to snag a bigger one later.

 

In NOVA’s Decoding Neanderthals, we learned that these hominoids were not the brutish, knuckle-dragging simpletons we’d conjured. They were powerfully built, yes, but they also had large brains. They were adept at tool-making, and in fact, may have developed the first synthetic product, a type of glue. It was a very tough life in the Ice Age, and it’s unlikely that most Neanderthals lived past age 30.

 

Within the last decade, it’s been confirmed that Neanderthals interbred with their close cousins, homo sapiens. Many of us of European or Asian ancestry carry snippets of Neanderthal DNA. That’s just what my brother’s genetic test showed. In fact, he has more than the average amount.

 

A prevailing theory holds that our homo sapiens ancestors vanquished the Neanderthals. With the recent genetic evidence, another theory merits consideration: Through mating, the Neanderthals – with their smaller populations – were simply absorbed into homo sapiens life. Look for a brand-new PBS program about Neanderthals this month, Neanderthals: Meet Your Ancestors on Wednesday, February 28 at 9:00 pm. [Note: Since publication, PBS has announced that the program has been postponed until further notice.] I suspect there’ll be further re-branding of my ancient forebears.

 

We want to thank Dr. Belinda A. Aquino for generously sponsoring the broadcasts of both Nature and NOVA on PBS Hawai‘i. A retired University of Hawai‘i political science professor, Dr. Aquino is an internationally recognized authority on contemporary Philippine affairs. She tells me that she savors these programs about natural phenomena because they inspire new ways to think about humanity and the world around us.

 

And I’d like to thank you, too, for your support of PBS Hawai‘i’s role of adding new perspectives and context to our collective understanding of history and current affairs. Myth-busting is a byproduct!

 

Aloha nui,

 

Leslie signature

GREAT PERFORMANCES
Vienna Philharmonic Summer Night Concert 2017

 

Led by German pianist and conductor Christoph Eschenbach, the world-renowned Vienna Philharmonic returns for its 14th annual open-air concert from Austria’s Imperial Schönbrunn Palace Gardens. In a program inspired by fairy tales and myths, soprano Renée Fleming performs arias from two operas by Antonin Dvořák as well as three songs by Sergei Rachmaninoff.

 

SECRETS OF THE DEAD
The Lost Gardens of Babylon

 

This program examines a world wonder so elusive that most people have decided it must be mythical. Centuries of digging have turned up nothing – but it turns out the searchers were digging in the wrong place. Now, this film proves that the spectacular hanging gardens of Babylon did exist, and shows where they were, what they looked like and how they were constructed.

 

SECRETS OF THE DEAD
Vampire Legend

 

Follow scientists as they uncover “deviant” burials dating back to medieval England, pointing to a belief that the dead could rise from their graves. Predating Eastern European legend, these discoveries force a re-examination of modern vampire lore.

 

JAZZ
The Adventure (1955-1960)

JAZZ: The Adventure (1955-1960)

 

As rhythm and blues and rock ‘n’ roll erode jazz’s audience, the music nonetheless enjoys a time of tremendous creativity. Tenor saxophonist John Coltrane scores a hit with his version of the show tune “My Favorite Things” and creates some of the most intense music in jazz history.

 

JAZZ
A Masterpiece by Midnight (1961-Present)

JAZZ: A Masterpiece by Midnight. Charles Mingus in 1976

 

In the 1960s, the question of what is jazz and what isn’t rages, dividing audiences, musicians and generations. Miles Davis leads a movement of jazz musicians who incorporate elements of rock and soul into their music.

 

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